Transdink

translink

Transdink | Nickname | Translink, the local transportation company run by an unelected board of bankers. The negative “dink” connotation of the sobriquet is well earned. Take your pick of complaints: over-crowding; fare increases; lack of late night transit; the new fare-gate system will never pay for itself; the new Compass card won’t accept bus tickets paid with cash; they eliminated free Sundays for those who bought monthly passes; the Gateway Project defied the GVRD’s own Livable Region Strategic Plan; the new buses didn’t work with bike racks; the new cash machines didn’t take the new currency; the constant delays on the Evergreen Line; the arming of security guards; the decision to use the Cambie Corridor over the Arbutus right-of-way and the ensuing damage done to small businesses; the removed capacity for rapid transit over the new Port Mann Bridge; buses not coordinating with BC Ferries and the West Coast Express; Skytrain technology being extremely expensive; SNC Lavalin is a war profiteer; The Canada Line was made with foreign, non-union labour; it’s tied to gas taxes, so the more people who take transit, the more money Translink loses; et cetera…

Usage: “Hey, I’m on my way. I could be early, late, broke, or shot. Yeah, I’m taking Transdink…”explore-the-lexicon

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