These Small Companies Have Retooled to Produce Made-in-Vancouver Face Masks

The Resistance Mask by Search and Recue Denim | Source: Instagram

It seems cloth masks are going to be a part of our lives for a bit. You can make your own at home, but if you want to support a small local business in these tricky times, here are some Vancouver companies that have temporarily retooled for mask production.

Blackwood Apparel | A great group of people that normally produces aprons, chef jackets and kitchen staff uniforms for our restaurant community. Right now they’re changed gears to make very simple washable and reusable fabric face masks and selling them for $5.50 per.


 

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Search and Rescue Denim | In normal times, this group of hard-working locals produces high quality aprons for bartenders, chefs, salon workers and basically anyone who’d prefer to look good when practicing their craft. They quickly sold out of their first run of masks but have already begun production on the next batch. Bonus: for every $24 mask sold (available in three sizes) they donate another to Coastal Health.


 

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Glasnost | Stephanie Schneider was a restaurant industry worker before she started this small garment company (I love the look of her waterproof jackets). She’s taken one of her machines home from her workshop to make her masks in four sizes for $15 each. Bonus: for every sale she will be donating a mask to a front line worker on the DTES and $1 to the Vancouver Food Bank.


 

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AW by Andrea Wong | This local designer normally makes beautiful handbags but has temporarily shifted to focus on fabric masks, which are now being made to order in Chinatown. Each mask has a linen liner pocket for removable filters, plus adjustable straps. Cost is on a sliding scale with buyers paying what they can.


Abel Wear | With support and fabric from local super-business-women Michelle Rizzardo (One of a Few) and Sunja Link (Sunja Link’s Body Shoppe), plus the North Shore Alliance Church, the local women’s clothing brand is currently hard at work creating hundreds of masks for vulnerable people in Vancouver and North Vancouver, but will also be selling individual masks to the public (available on a sliding scale of $10-15 each, DM @abelwear for more info). Abel Wear is a women-run business employing a small team of women living with barriers – shout out to all the amazing ladies!

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  1. Also, local brand (and all around lovely lady) Abel Wear has collaborated with One of a Few and Sunja Link to make some. That’s three amazing women run businesses working together, which definitely deserves a shout out in my books! 😉

  2. Would also love to shine some appreciation on Matt and Scott who run HMPL Design who are doing the same!

  3. de volk & gosche has switched from high end haute couture to cute, heavy cotton printed masks with filter pockets. Proceeds to Vancouver Food Bank. View options on website @devolkgosche.com or through IG @devolkgosche.

    Their owner and Artistic Director has worked in the Vancouver Hospitality Industry for 28 years and was at Black & Blue until Glowbal temporarily shuttered its doors due to Covid-19.

  4. Enviral Mask is a new company manufacturing cloth face masks for sale in Vancouver. 100% Indian cotton professionally sewn in various colors and patterns. Environmentally friendly because they are washable. Child size available. Order online at enviralmask.com

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