Remembering the Beloved Tex-Mex Restaurant That Joked About Cheating ‘Tourists & Drunks’

Image via Flickr.

The ever-evolving Restaurant Graveyard series looks back at the countless, long-shuttered establishments that helped to propel Vancouver’s food and drink forward. Full A-Z with maps and photos here. May they never be forgotten!

Carlos ‘n Bud’s was a popular, casual, loosely American roadhouse-styled restaurant located in what used to be a mechanic’s shop and garage at the southern end of Seymour Street. Launched in 1988 by a pair of former Keg employees, Brad Hereuf and Marco Hubbard, the restaurant was beloved for its affordable Tex-Mex menu (think burgers, enchiladas, nachos, blended margaritas, etc.) and locally famous for its house-smoked ribs, which were best enjoyed with ice cold bottles of Corona beer on the patio. It was also notorious for its varied exterior signage, which included lines like “Patronized by Royalty & Nobility” and “We Cheat Tourists & Drunks”. The restaurant was closed in 2005 and demolished in 2006 to make room for a high rise condominium called The Mark. Side note: Hereuf and Hubbard purchased the Carlos ‘n Bud’s restaurant space (previously “Bud’s Good Eats”) from Bud Kanke, the same legend who would later go on to open Joe Fortes and The Cannery.


There are 4 comments

  1. “Patronized by royalty and nobility” was a good slogan welcoming their guests.

  2. Carlos n Buds, opened as Bud’s Good Eats. Bud changed it to Carlos N Buds mirroring the concept of Carlos’ N Charlies in Mexico and the US. He did not sell it to Brad and Marco. He sold it to a partnership group that operated from 85 to 88 and then it was sold to Brad and Marco. A few of the partnership group were also investors in Joe Fortes in 1985 when it opened.

  3. As Rob said, I will confirm as I was a LOYAL partaker of their HUGE Long Bone Beef ribs and their Nachos were second to non.. The BEST.. And during Expo 86, when it arrive, try to find a table or a bar stool.. LOL.. I even had to volunteer to be a busboy when they were overrun with customers..