Why Sharing the Things You Love Sometimes Ends Up Destroying Them

(via) The vlogbrothers tell the fascinating, cautionary tale of a Swedish photographer named Patrik Svedberg who was besotted by a cool-looking ‘broccoli tree’. He loved photographing and sharing images of the tree through all kinds of weather and situations. It became the focus of Svedberg’s life, resulting in art shows, calendars and thousands of Instagram followers. Ultimately and unfortunately, drawing attention to its awesomeness came with consequences. Soon the tree was pinned as a destination on Google Maps and people from all over the world were coming to take photos of it. Then, in a bizarre act of arboreal trolling, the beautiful thing met a violent, senseless end. A good story, well told.

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  1. This is what has happened to a certain tree on the of Westside Vancouver, it has been added to Altas Obscura and now it’s going to get bombarded by tourists! :[

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