When Graphic Designers See Algorithms in the Works of Master Painters

Rembrandt Peale‘s portrait of his daughter, Rosalba

(via) With the assistance of 3D animation software, Greek graphic/visual designer Dimitris Ladapoulus looks at the works of Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn and Rembrandt Peale and sees an algorithm at play that changes the surfaces of the 17th and 19th century canvases in ways that make them entirely – surprisingly – new objects.

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn’s Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert

The algorithm delineates and divide the colours within the artworks into thousands of different shades which Ladapoulus (and, presumably, the software) raises in relief and rectilinearly blocks in interconnected allotments. The two paintings seeing this special treatment here are Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn’s Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert and Rembrandt Peale‘s portrait of his daughter, Rosalba. Take a closer look…

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