Meet The Old School Machinists Still Printing The New York Times


If you’re even just a little bit interested in how big, complicated things work, you’re going to dig State of Repair, a new web series from Motherboard (Vice). In the first episode, Jason Koebler takes a look inside the belly of The New York Times and meets the people running the presses:

As the world’s largest technology manufacturers increasingly move toward creating products that are designed to be difficult or impossible to repair, Motherboard has started looking toward the margins of tech to find the people keeping older machines alive and running. In the first episode of State of Repair, we visited the New York Times printing plant to meet Greg Zerafa, Jerry Greaney, and Chris Bedetto, who are part of a dying breed of machinists that keeps the newspaper’s eight three-story printing presses humming and spitting out hundreds of thousands of newspapers every single day.

Read Jason’s companion piece here.

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