Whistler’s Audain Art Museum Reopens Friday, June 26

The GOODS from Audain Art Museum

Whistler, BC | Director & Chief Curator, Dr. Curtis Collins, announced today that the Audain Art Museum (AAM) will reopen to the public on Friday, June 26 with new hours. The award-winning 56,000 square foot Museum by Patkau Architects will now open every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 11am – 6pm. Additionally, the AAM will open for Canada Day on Wednesday, July 1 and Thursday, July 2.

“This Museum aspires to be a welcoming space of cultural contemplation and inspiration for the public during these times of global uncertainty” said Dr. Collins. “We recognize that reopening comes with an entirely new set of operating protocols and are committed to maintaining the health, safety and comfort of visitors as well as staff.”

The Audain Art Museum’s framework for reopening aligns with BC health authority guidelines, including, but not limited to:

– reduced capacity and group size to ensure 2 metre physical distancing
– limited number of visitors in each space with a clearly marked directional traffic flow
– hand sanitization upon entry to Museum, Museum Shop and points throughout the Museum
– personal protective equipment for all staff including plexiglass barriers and/or masks
– touchless check in experience is encouraged, high-touch areas will be sanitized regularly
– for more information, visit audainartmuseum.com

Public tours and events will remain postponed until further notice. The AAM’s new Tuesday Night Talks virtual engagement series will continue weekly on Zoom at 8pm until June 30.

The Audain Art Museum’s reopening on Friday, June 26 is in alignment with that of the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre (SLCC) as Whistler strives to become a cultural tourism destination. For guests wishing to experience both facilities, a dual admission Cultural Pass can be purchased in person or online.

About the Audain Art Museum | Established in 2016, the Audain Art Museum was founded via a major philanthropic gift of Michael Audain and Yoshiko Karasawa. The institution’s permanent collection is focused on the art of British Columbia, including an outstanding holding of historic First Nations masks, a comprehensive selection of paintings by Emily Carr and a brilliant range of works by Vancouver’s photo-conceptualists. The Museum hosts two temporary exhibitions per year that feature artists and collections of national as well as international significance.

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