Relax, There’s a Gregorian Chant Generator Now

A signal processing engineer named Stéphane Pigeon put together a Gregorian chant generator so he (and we) could mix our own relaxing a cappella tunes based on those heard in Catholic monasteries for over a thousand years. Give it a try.

Gregorian Chant first came to exist in the 9th and 10th centuries in Western and Central Europe, and were named after the Pope St. Gregory the Great (540-604 A.D). These chants are performed A Capella, without musical support, and sung in Latin. Latin had been the language in use throughout the Roman Catholic Church almost since its foundation. When the Second Vatican Council introduced the use of native language in the Mass instead of Latin, in 1962, the tradition of Gregorian Chants started to decline. Today, Gregorian Chants are rarely sung during offices anymore, but can be heard in some retired monasteries. The sound created by the Monks performing Gregorian Chants, transports you to a time long gone.

These chants had such long tradition — more than ten centuries — because they probably touch deep in one’s very soul and spirituality, and brought a marvellous sense of inner peace. Music knows neither area, time nor language. If you wish, allow yourself to escape your busy life for a while, and re-connect with yourself. Close your eyes, and let the ancient sounds of Monks carry you away.

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