We Want to Sleep in the Cockpit of a 747 Permanently Parked at YVR Airport

Vancouver Would Be Cooler If is a column that advocates for things that exist in other cities that could serve to improve or otherwise celebrate life in our own.

Wouldn’t it be great to have something as cool as Stockholm’s Jumbostay attached to YVR Airport? As much as we appreciate the luxury and convenience of the airport’s Fairmont Hotel, it wouldn’t hurt to give it some direct competition. From Insider:

Jumbostay has been on the tarmac of Arlanda Airport, Stockholm, since 2009. The Boeing 747 plane was built in 1976, and was last operated by Transjet, a Swedish airline that went bankrupt in 2002. It was converted by owner Oscar Diös into a functioning hotel.

It has 33 rooms and 76 beds. Guests can choose from the engine rooms – which are converted under the wings, to hostel-style beds, single rooms and the cockpit suite.

Booking the cockpit suite gets you exclusive access to the VIP lounge. The original airline seats are still in place, as well as bar, drawers and magazines. The control panel above the bed is still in place, and the room also has an ensuite.

Jumbostay’s staff are all referred to as cabin crew, and wear stewards’ uniforms. The plane is within easy reach of Arlanda Airport train station, and can be accessed by a free shuttle bus.

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