Architectural Taxidermy

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Architectural Taxidermy | design colloquialism | An increasingly popular and sometimes controversial solution for heritage preservation. It is the process by which architects and developers literally “skin” the exterior (or façade) of a heritage building and stuff it into an altogether new structure, sometimes with especially awkward results. An adjunct to (or example of) Façadism.

Usage | “The newly developed Santa Fe building at Oak and 14th Avenue (pictured above) is a classic example of Architectural Taxidermy.”

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