Chinese Year Of The Rabbit Soon To Get Hopping At “Wild Rice”

January 10, 2011 

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Wild Rice is located at 117 West Pender in Vancouver, BC | 604-642-2882 | www.wildricevancouver.com

News from Scout supporter Wild Rice

Vancouver, BC | One ancient Chinese axiom states that if a thing is worth doing, it’s worth doing at least twice. Consider New Year’s for instance. There’s the ‘mainstream’ New Year’s Eve held on December 31st – a rather sedate affair by Chinese standards (elegant champagne, a few little noisemakers, steamers and silly hats). Since the idea of celebrating New Year is essentially a good one, why not do it again? This time hold a party that lasts 15 days and includes parades, dragon and lion dances, tons of noisy firecrackers and food, lots and lots of special food. Now, that’s a celebration worthy of welcoming a new year.

Hippety hoppety into the Chinese Year of the Rabbit (4709 if you’re counting) with a special prix fixe menu at Wild Rice. Proprietor Andrew Wong and Executive Chef Todd Bright have created a four-course dinner for the auspicious price of $38.88 (numeral three meaning ‘ever-growing’ and numeral eight meaning ‘good luck’) which will be available from February 2 to 13, 2011. Don’t worry, as much as many people enjoy the taste of rabbit, you won’t find Thumper on this menu. Instead, Wild Rice will donate 10 percent of the menu’s proceeds to support the Rabbit Rescue Shelter. Read more

New Summer Menu At “Wild Rice” Pays Homage To Hawkers’ Fare…

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Wild Rice is located at 117 West Pender in Vancouver, BC | 604-642-2882 | www.wildricevancouver.com

News from Scout supporter Wild Rice

Vancouver, BC | Summer brings an abundance of fresh-from-the-farm/sea/producer ingredients bursting with flavour. It’s also a time when we naturally prefer to eat lighter fare. In recognition of this, Wild Rice’s new summer menu offers diners several different options to enjoy the season’s bounty.

“After the success of our Asian Heritage Month Platter that contained four ‘snack dishes,’ we thought that people might want to try mixing and matching a variety of flavours. In China there is a tradition of street food called dai pai dong where people wander from stall to stall trying different dishes – dumplings at one, soup at another, noodles in a different location and something sweet at a fourth. Our new summer menu reflects some of that sensibility,” says owner Andrew Wong.

Sharezies is the order of the day for summer dining. As in traditional Chinese restaurants, all dishes are designed to share and come with serving utensils and extra bowls. Food is served ‘family-style’ meaning that it comes out of the kitchen as soon as it is prepared. So if you like, you may roam the menu at will. There’s no set order to the food. It’s like eating at the Night Market but instead of physically moving from stall to stall you just meander through the menu. Read more

Know Your Local Designer: On A Cedar Log With Brent Comber…

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Something spectacular happens where nature meets the urban, and Brent Comber knows all about that. Growing up on Vancouver’s North Shore, the designer’s childhood world was both city living and forest dwelling. Inspired by his surroundings, he began his career in landscaping, working with the raw materials that surrounded him. He acquired his knowledge of landscaping the same way he later acquired his woodworking skills: through his hands. Yet it was through his heart that his work began to transform. When Brent first introduced his work at an outdoor garden show in Vancouver, a woman approached his booth and sat on one of his benches. The woman closed her eyes and ran her hand across the smooth wood. When Brent approached her, she revealed that the fragrance of the cedar transported her back to her childhood, when she and her grandfather would spend hours walking on the the logs that had washed up on the shore. In that moment, Brent discovered the capacity of the wood to tell stories in its own rich and expressive language, and he resolved to continue to craft his pieces with a story in mind. From the 18 foot, one-piece communal table at Salt Tasting Room to the soaring western maple wall sculpture at Yew in the Four Seasons, his artistry can be found in many iconic Vancouver locations.

Indie Profile

Three things about your neighbourhood that make you want to live there: My home is in the Hollyburn area of West Vancouver. I love being able to walk to the beach, to great restaurants and to my children’s schools.

When you finish a piece of furniture intended for a specific space, what do you hope to feel? I feel proud when our work compliments the designer’s vision and excited to see it in context.

What inspires your choice of wood for a given project? It really depends on the particular feel or story I wish to convey. Each wood species can engage people differently, depending on the texture and the finish. For example, our Shattered collection is about the physical energy and thought required to organize the split timber into cubes. It is about the process – the choice of material is secondary.

If wood can tell a story, which one of your pieces carries your favourite story? The Alder Cube. It’s an evocative piece constructed from very simple materials. It also conveys a beautiful story of how a forest can change you as you pass through it. People are fascinated to discover that the piece is constructed from vertical stacked branches and it appears that air is the only thing holding the sticks together. For a moment, you find yourself inside the cube trying to unravel this mystery much like your state of mind when you are in the deep woods. There are other stories hidden within each piece – it all depends on where you look. Read more

“Wild Rice” On West Pender Joins The Growing Scout Community

April 27, 2010 

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Wild Rice is now a proud member supporter of Scout. We will be publishing the award-winning restaurant’s news and press releases on our front page and hosting a page for them in our recommended list. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank them for their support. Click ahead to read on or jump directly to their Scout page here. Read more

Irish Heather And The Cascade In New Book: “21st Century Bars”

April 27, 2010 

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Two of our favourite local bars, The Cascade Room and The Irish Heather, have landed in a new, 240 hardcover book called 21st Century Bars. The photo-driven tome from The Images Publishing Group details the most beautifully designed bars from all around the world. Kudos to the designers of both joints – our friends at Vancouver’s own Evoke ID.

Wild Rice

October 5, 2008 

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Details

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117 West Pender,Vancouver, BC V6B 1S4 | MAP
T: 604-642-2882 | F: 604-642-6778
Email: info@wildricevancouver.com
Web: www.wildricevancouver.com | Facebook

Hours

Wild Rice is open 7 days a week (for dinner every night, lunch only on Fridays)
Sunday – Thursday: 5 p.m. to at least 11 p.m.
Friday: 11:30 a.m. to midnight
Saturday: 5 p.m. to midnight

Gallery

Wild Rice | Back Mezzanine (MT)Wild Rice | Panna Cotta (HA)Wild Rice | Kung Pao Chicken #2 (TP)Wild Rice, | The bar (MT)Wild Rice | Sablefish (HH)Wild Rice | Sablefish (MT)Wild Rice | Long Beans (HH)

The Team

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Proprietor: Andrew Wong
Executive Chef: Todd Bright
Dining Room Manager: Kerri Clark

About Wild Rice

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Wild Rice began as a simple thought from Andrew Wong. His wish was to create a socially conscious restaurant serving local cuisine with influences from his Chinese heritage.

The space is a blend of yin and yang, east and west, traditional and modern. As in traditional Chinese cuisine, the menu offers numerous dishes for sharing. Where they diverge from tradition is in the ingredients, presentation and style.

As a proud member of OceanWise, Green Table and Shark Truth, Wild Rice is committed to serving ingredients that are local, seasonal and sustainable. The wine list reflects a thoughtful selection of the best from BC and West Coast vineyards.

Yin/yang sensibilities inform every aspect of Wild Rice. Guests receive metal knives and forks (western, yang) along with bamboo chopsticks (asian, yin). The sharp geometric lines (yang) of the room and its furniture are softened by the effect of the curves (yin) in the bar and bolsters. The energy of the loft fire wall is balanced by the calming ice blue resin of the bar. Harmony prevails and guests instantly feel comfortable.

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