VANCOUVER LEXICON | Fatassenstrasse

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Fatassenstrasse | Place | The nickname for Denman Street in the West End. It was earned on account of all the street’s many dessert specialty shops and fast food outlets.

Usage: “I’m feeling peckish for shitty poutine and brownies. Let’s go down to Fatassenstrasse and get thoroughly gross!”

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Gastown

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Gastown, so named after one of its unofficial founders, “Gassy Jack” Deighton, occupies the western stretch of the Downtown Eastside. According to our read of the landscape, its the area between Columbia (east), Cambie/Homer (West), Hastings (North), and Water (South), save for the 300 block Carrall and the blocks of Hastings east of Abbott, which we classify as being part of the Downtown Eastside’s core. It has come a long way since its day as the Township of Granville and the great conflagration of 1886 (which burned most of it to the ground), ebbing and flowing over the decades as a hard-edged entertainment nexus where much of the rest of Vancouver feared to tread.

Over the last ten years, however, Gastown’s slice of the city’s zeitgeist was fattened by a large number of interesting, independent, and cocktail-forward eateries launched by a new generation of young restaurateurs. It also saw a new wave of higher end retail shops and fashionable boutiques open during this same time frame, not to mention the arrival of new lofts, condominiums, and the new Woodwards building. All of these new developments have transformed/gentrified the neighbourhood, some argue for the better and others for the worse. Doubtless it’s become something of an “it” destination, similar to Yaletown in the early 2000′s, which is to say it’s quite possibly cursed with a future full of stretched SUV limousines, shitty chain restaurants, and people who want to fight for no good reason at all.

History and angst aside, it’s no longer easy to get a table as a walk-in on a Friday night, so if you’re headed this way (and you really should), be sure to make at least the roughest of game plans.

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Standard post-1886 fire brick red/brown; stained copper green barrel base of the Gassy Jack statue; soft, spherical yellow streetlights at night; Blood Alley beer piss; broken fake cobblestone grey; ubiquitous Corbel Commercial Real Estate “For Lease” sign blue; Juice Truck pink; Guinness brown; green summer leaves of Maple Tree Square; the new “W” sign atop the Woodwards development; Meat & Bread house mustard yellow; cigarette filter brown.

here-you-will-find

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GOOD GRAFFITI AND WHEAT PASTE/STENCIL ART
FOOTBALL MIKE KEEPING THINGS IN ORDER
THE OLD FIREPLACES OF “THE NEW FRISCO HOTEL”
A RESTAURATEUR HAPPY HE NEVER JOINED THE FRENCH FOREIGN LEGION
ALEX “RHEK” USOW CREATING INTERESTING THINGS
AN ANCIENT, UNUSED BAR HIDDEN IN A HOTEL BASEMENT
OLD SCHOOL POWELL PERALTA SKATE SHIRTS
DESIGN MASTERPIECES AT INFORM INTERIORS
THE STENCH OF STALE URINE AT THE EASTERN ENTRANCE OF BLOOD ALLEY
A PARADISE FOR SHOE FETISHISTS
SOME VERY PRETTY AXES

what-to-eat-and-drink

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THE FULL BRUNCH SPREAD AT WILDEBEEST
MAPLE BACON CHOCOLATE BAR AT MEAT & BREAD
BRUSSELS SPROUTS & PORK BELLY AT POURHOUSE
SUMMERTIME PATIO PINTS AT CHILL WINSTON
A MINT JULEP AT THE DIAMOND
THE FONDANT POTATOES AND AN AVIATION COCKTAIL AT L’ABATTOIR
A CUP OF COFFEE AT REVOLVER
PIZZA AT NICLI
BEEF & PORK ALBONDIGAS AT THE SARDINE CAN
FRESHLY MADE CHOCOLATE AT EAST VAN ROASTERS
GARLIC BUTTER & PARMESAN POPCORN AT SIX ACRES
WILD SOCKEYE NIGIRI AT SEA MONSTR SUSHI
AN H-MADE COCKTAIL AT NOTTURNO
A PINT OF THE DARK AT THE IRISH HEATHER

cool-things-of-note

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- The triangular Hotel Europe on Powell Street was Vancouver’s first reinforced concrete structure and the first fireproof hotel in Western Canada.

- In 1971, police arrested 79 people in Maple Tree Square after a protest against drug laws and raids escalated into a bloody brawl between protestors and armed police. This is known as the Gastown Riot.

- Blood Alley’s nomenclature is not so spooky: the alley is actually named Trounce Alley, and the connected “Blood Alley Square” was named by a city planner in the 1970s as part of a project to revitalize and draw attention to the area.

- In 1869, Vancouver’s first jail was built in the Township of Granville (informally known as Gastown). It consisted of two cells constructed of logs, and later was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1886.

- The Boulder Hotel at 1 West Cordova (the original Boneta location, RIP) was once the central point of the Granville Township in the 1890′s, and features stones mined from Queen Elizabeth Park.

- The massive 1972 street “renovation” of Gastown was noted as being the first time in North America that perfectly good roads were torn up to be rebuilt in the old style.

- The “historic” steam clock, an iconic Gastown landmark, was actually built in 1977 and features three electric motors.

- Chef/Restaurateur John Bishop got his start cooking in Gastown in the 1970′s.

- The NABOB Coffee Company was founded in Gastown in 1896, in what is now The Landing (home to the Steamworks Brewing Company).

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Fraserhood

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The Fraserhood is the collection of East Vancouver blocks within the larger Kensington-Cedar Cottage neighbourhood. It’s bordered by East Broadway, 31st, Prince Albert, and St. George with its nexus sitting at the busy intersection of Fraser and Kingsway.

For decades it’s been home to a working class community, and despite the especially Anglo nomenclature of its streets, its residents are chiefly a mix of Chinese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Indian, and Polish. Only a third are native English speakers. The retail shops, restaurants, markets, and community hubs of its high streets are strikingly diverse, and what these lack in frills they more than make up for in character and authenticity. From Robson Park all the way south to Mountain View Cemetery, hours spent wandering the Fraserhood are always well spent.

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Matchstick espresso crema; Bee Kim Heng’s spicy beef jerky; bowl of cheezies at The Black Lodge; Collage Collage facade tricolour; Deandra’s sunny locks at Heartbreaker Salon; glass of Les Hauts du Fief at Les Faux Bourgeois; guacamole at Sal y Limon; rainy day grass of Robson Park; snake mosaic tricolour at Los Cuervos; Red Stripe beer at Lion’s Den Cafe.

here-you-will-find

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THE LEAFY SHADE OF TINY MCCAULEY PARK
EPIC VIEWS OF THE NORTH SHORE MOUNTAINS
CLASSES & WORKSHOPS AT COLLAGE COLLAGE
A ONE STOP PIZZA/MARIJUANA JOINT
THE ANNUAL PINOY FIESTA CELEBRATING FILIPINO CULTURE
SHOCKINGLY FEW CONDOMINIUMS (FOR VANCOUVER)
THE TUPPER NEIGHBOURHOOD GREENWAY
PEOPLE LEGALLY PURCHASING FIREARMS
ALL KINDS OF AWESOME AT THE TOAST COLLECTIVE
MONDAY NIGHT PICK-UP GAMES OF KICK BALL IN ROBSON PARK (SUMMER)

what-to-eat-and-drink

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VEGETARIAN POUTINE DOGS AT THE BLACK LODGE
PORK IN COCONUT SAUCE (SISIG) AT PINPIN
HAWAIIAN PUNCH AT PIZZERIA BARBARELLA (BEST PIZZA IN VANCOUVER)
GOAT CURRY AT THE LION’S DEN
SUNDAES AT EARNEST ICE CREAM
KUNG PAO SQUID AT GRAND VIEW SZECHUAN
ALSATIAN TARTE FLAMBEE AT LES FAUX BOURGEOIS
BUBBLE TEA AT BUBBLE TOWN
BATTERED PRAWN & TAMARIND TACOS AT LOS CUERVOS
CROISSANTS AND COFFEE AT MATCHSTICK
BUN BO HUE (SPICY BEEF NOODLE) SOUP AT PHO QUYEN
HOT & SOUR SOUP AT ROYAL FORTUNE
HUEVOS RANCHEROS AT JETHRO’S
CHICKEN MATTER ALU DOSAS AT NOORU MAHAL
TAIWANESE MEATBALLS (TAKE HOME) AT WONDER MEATBALL
JASMINE GREEN ICED T WITH CITRUS & PALM SYRUP AT ARTISAN TEA BAR
JUICY, SWEET TOP ROUND JERKY AT BEE KIM HENG
“AL PASTOR” TACOS AND HOUSEMADE POTATO CHIPS AT SAL Y LIMON

cool-things-of-note

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- Fraser Street was developed in 1875 as a wagon road to connect the farmlands of the Fraser River to the False Creek Trail (now known as Kingsway).

- In 1910 the local section of the North Arm Road was renamed Fraser Avenue after explorer Simon Fraser. Since 1948 it was known as Fraser Street.

- The area squared by East 12th Avenue, King Edward Avenue, Fraser Street, and Knight Streets is also known as Dickens, after the nearby Charles Dickens Elementary.

- In 1909 Fraser Street’s first streetcar line, the Victory Line, was installed, which brought commuters “downtown” near Victory Square.

- McAuley Park at the intersection of Kingsway and Fraser is named for Harvey and Theresa McAuley, winners of the Canadian Federal Volunteer Award in 2001.

- There are over 92,000 graves in Mountain View Cemetery, with many buried double-deep to extend capacity.

- In the early 1880s the only commercial building in the area was the Junction Inn, a roadhouse at the modern-day intersection of Fraser and Kingsway.

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West Side

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Vancouver’s “West Side” is a catch-all term that describes the large area west of Ontario St south of False Creek and the Cambie, Granville, and Burrard St. bridges. It includes many neighbourhoods and micro-hoods, among them Marpole, Oakridge, Southlands, UBC, West Point Grey, Shaughnessy, Arbutus Ridge, Dunbar, Fairview, South Granville, Cambie Village, Kerrisdale, and Kitsilano. It is largely affluent and almost entirely residential, save for the vast Endowment Lands/Pacific Spirit Regional Park, UBC Campus, and high streets/villages such as Cornwall, West 4th, Broadway, West 41st, Granville, Oak, Cambie, Alma, and lower Yew. It is home to some of Vancouver’s most beloved beaches (Kits, Jericho, Spanish, Wreck), institutions (Jericho Sailing Club, Zulu Records), and restaurants (La Quercia, Bishop’s).

Much like East Van, the West Side’s entirety doesn’t have a personality of its own. It’s only in its pockets and strips that its real characters emerge. Some are a little sleepy, archly conservative, and decidedly NIMBYesque, while others more relaxed and inclusive. One – Kitsilano – can claim a counter-culture past, and still – somewhat amusingly – holds on to its hippiedom despite almost impossibly high commercial and residential rents and the dwarfing ratio of BMWs to bikes, strollers to dreadlocks, boutiques to head shops, and Kenny G. to Jimi Hendrix. On the whole, the West Side often feels like it’s very (voluntarily) separate from Vancouver, but no matter – with the right breeze and length of shadow, it’s sometime the best place on earth.

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On the West Side at the moment (our HOOD palettes are ever-changing), we’re seeing the tri-colour of the Red-winged Blackbirds that hang around the ponds of Jericho Beach Park; the snot green signage at The Fringe Cafe; a shard of broken orange beach frisbee; the decrepit Hollywood Theatre facade; the “sponge-treatment Mediterranean” orange walls inside the Parthenon Supermarket; the shock of red on the top of Pileated Woodpecker’s head; a whole lot of Wreck Beach noob flesh; some rain-soaked concrete of the Museum of Anthropology; the first tee marshal’s shack at the University Golf Club; Kerrisdale Arena frontage tri-colour; the rust-coloured giant letters of the old “RIDGE” sign; the fine gravel baseball diamond at Trimble Park; the massive whale skeleton at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum.

here-you-will-find

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THE ONLY WORKING FARM (UBC) WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS
QUALITY CLOTHES AT HILLS OF KERRISDALE
WHOLE WEEKENDS LOST IN THE SANDS OF KITS BEACH
SALVATION ARMY & SPCA THIRFT STORES
TEENAGERS SKIM BOARDING AT SPANISH BANKS
CHINESE TOURISTS MARVELLING AT OLD PENISES BEING BURNED AT WRECK BEACH
THE UNDER-UTILIZED ASSET THAT IS THE ARBUTUS CORRIDOR
P.D.’S HOT SHOP, SCARING LOWER MAINLAND MOMS OF SKATEBOARDERS SINCE THE 80s
FERAL RABBITS FORNICATING IN THE BRAMBLES AT JERICHO BEACH
NIMBYS AGAINST EVERYTHING THAT DOESN”T INCREASE THE VALUE OF THEIR PROPERTY
MORE ULTIMATE FRISBEE PLAYERS THAN PEOPLE LIVING IN POVERTY
RELICS FROM THE SECOND WORLD WAR IN WEST POINT GREY

what-to-eat-and-drink

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BURGERS & BEERS ON THE SUNNY PATIO AT JERICHO SAILING CLUB
THE HAM & PEA PIZZA AT BUFALA
FRIES AND MISO GRAVY AT THE NAAM
VITELLO TONNATO & AGNOLOTTI DI GUIDO AT LA QUERCIA
ENCHILADAS & CHOCOLATE CAKE AT TOPANGA CAFE
KALE & CAULIFLOWER SALAD AT THE OAKWOOD
EMPTY STOMACH OMAKASE AT DAN
“ENGLISH TEACHER” SANDWICH AT THE PROFESSOR & THE PIGEON
CROWDED DIM SUM AT GOLDEN OCEAN
AFTERNOON TEA SERVICE (PROPER) AT FAUBOURG
RAINY DAY COFFEE AT MOMENTO
LEMON CHICKEN AT CONNIE’S COOKHOUSE

cool-things-of-note

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- Kerrisdale is named after the former Scottish home of the McKinnon family, Kerry’s Dale, in 1897.

- During World War II there were several defenses built at UBC to ward off a feared Japanese invasion, including trios of strategically placed artillery guns.

- The Kerrisdale Arena was home to Vancouver’s first rock ‘n’ roll concert. Bill Haley and the Comets played there in 1957.

- Glenbrea Mansion in Shaughnessy was home to the Vancouver chapter of the Ku Klux Klan for just under a year from 1927-1928.

- Margaret Atwood got her start as a lecturer at UBC in the English Department.

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Chinatown

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Chinatown, a commercial (and increasingly residential) neighbourhood within the Downtown Eastside, has been one of Vancouver’s most vibrant areas since the City’s beginnings. It got its start as a ghetto on the edge of the Granville Townsite in the late 1880′s, when scores of Chinese immigrants arrived to work BC’s mines and build its railroads. The institutional racism of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1923 and the anti-animated neon signage laws of 1974 did little to curb its vibrancy, and today it is home to an eclectic mix of traditional and trendy eateries, markets (both day and night), gardens, temples, and a wide assortment of businesses ranging from tea shops and apothecaries to art galleries and vintage stores. Its borders are squared roughly by Abbott/Taylor (west), Gore (east), Pender (north), and Keefer/East Georgia (south). The 200 block of Union St. (between Main and Gore) is technically part of Chinatown, but we count the section east of its alleyway as a part of Strathcona.

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Blue/Orange facades of Ho Sun Hing Printers & Fresh Egg Mart on East Georgia; the leafiness of Dr. Sun Yat Sen Classical Gardens; omnipresent decorative red and gold; freshly horked old man loogie; marinated eggplant with soy, garlic, and ginger at Bao Bei; stinky summer fish gut puddle; dead alleyway pigeon tri-colour; dried tokay gecko on a stick.

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DEAD LIZARDS FOR YOUR PENIS*
$8.99 (AND CHEAPER) HAIRCUTS
EXCELLENT PARADES WITH BAGPIPES & DRAGONS
THE RENNIE COLLECTION AT WING SANG
A LITTLE QUIET SOLITUDE AT DR. SUN-YAT SEN GARDEN
OUT OF THE ORDINARY ANTIQUES
THE OCCASIONAL RAT
PRESENTS FOR YOUR MOM
GAMES OF POOL AT THE LONDON PUB
THE VIEW FROM THE TOP OF THE KEEFER PARKADE
AN UNSUSTAINABLE AMOUNT OF MARIJUANA DISPENSARIES
BLIM WORKSHOPS
SWEET VINTAGE AT DUCHESSE
THE NICE GUYS AT THE SHOP
THE PLAZA SKATEPARK
SUPPLIES FOR LIQUOR LOVERS
A WHOLE LOTTA PIGEONS
LEATHER BAGS AT ERIN TEMPLETON
THE JIMI HENDRIX SHRINE
* the dried lizards (tokay geckos) are a traditional Chinese medicine for impotence, tuberculosis, and asthma.

what-to-eat-and-drink

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MARINATED EGGPLANT (OR PRETTY MUCH ANYTHING) AT BAO BEI
APOTHECARY COCKTAILS AT THE KEEFER BAR
LATE NIGHT FRIED RICE AT GAIN WAH
ICE CREAM SANDWICHES FROM SCENT OF A SANDWICH
BBQ DUCK AT MONEY FOODS
COFFEE & CINNAMON TOAST AT MATCHSTICK
APPLE PIE FROM THE PIE SHOPPE
CHICKEN WINGS & GARLIC PRAWNS AT PHNOM PENH
THE BURGER AT MAMIE TAYLOR’S
PORK BUNS AT NEW TOWN BAKERY
SOFT SERVE ICE CREAM FROM PRIME TIME CHICKEN
POTATO TORNADOES AT THE NIGHT MARKET
PORK THURINGER CURRYWURST AT BESTIE

cool-things-of-note

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- The oldest standing structure in Chinatown is the Wing Sang Building on Pender, built in 1889 by Chinatown pioneer Yip Sang.

- Market Alley, spanning from Main Street and Carrall between Hastings and Pender, was a turn-of-the-century hotspot for opium production, gambling, and after-hours debauchery.

- Dr. Sun Yet-Sen Classical Chinese Garden was the first of its kind to be constructed outside of China.

- Vancouver’s Chinatown is the largest in Canada and one of the largest in North America.

- A city ordinance was passed in 1937 that prohibited Chinese-owned restaurants from employing white women. In 1939, city council amended the law to permit white waitresses in Chinatown restaurants that served “English meals to English customers”.

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East Van

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“East Van” is an umbrella term referring to all of the neighbourhoods east of Ontario Street. It includes Mount Pleasant, Riley Park, Main Street, Grandview-Woodlands, Killarney, Kensington-Cedar Cottage, Hastings Sunrise, The Fraserhood, Champlain Heights, Fraserview Victoria, Sunset, and Renfrew Collingwood. It is a huge swathe of land; largely residential (with some pockets of industrial), massively multi-cultural, and predominately working class.

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In East Van at the moment (our HOOD palettes are ever-changing), we’re seeing the seven core shades of the Trout Lake Community Centre; the late dusky sky that signals the start of the Illuminares Lantern Festival; Vancouver Giants tri-colour; the September grass in McSpadden Park; the little yellow Fiat in front of Via Tevere; the green doors of the Cedar Cottage Coffee House; the gravel pathways around New Brighton Park; lipstick red on the Burlesque dancers at The Biltmore; the North Shore mountains from Clinton Park; Punjabi Market signage.

here-you-will-find

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A BLUE COLLAR WORK ETHIC
LEESIDE, A SKATEPARK BUILT BY SKATEBOARDERS
INTENSE GAMES OF CRICKET
THE INCOMPARABLE 60′S STYLE 2400 MOTEL
THE AWESOME ODDITIES AT HACKSPACE
THE TROUT LAKE FARMERS MAKET
TOURS OF PURDY’S CHOCOLATE FACTORY
TWILIGHT LANTERN PROCESSIONS
BBQ’S AT NEW BRIGHTON PARK
INNER CITY KIDS WITH A PASSION FOR WRITING
A GREAT PLACE TO RENT A DRILL

what-to-eat-and-drink

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LATE NIGHT DONUTS AND PUPUSAS AT DUFFINS
BUFALA MOZZARELLA FROM BOSA FOODS
SATURDAY MORNING CINNAMON BUNS AT JJ BEAN ON POWELL
RAMEN BURGERS AT THE HAWKER’S MARKET
PRE-RACE BUFFET AT HASTINGS RACECOURSE
CARDAMOM INFUSED HONEY FROM MELLIFERA BEES
24 HOUR DOSAS AT HOUSE OF DOSAS

cool-things-of-note

The Alley Chairs project is curated by Nicole Arnett, an invaluable friend to Scout. It documents/invents the dramas surrounding the abandoned alleyway chairs and sofas of East Vancouver.

cool-things-of-note

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- In 1929 the Pacific Nation Exhibition (PNE) opened an amusement park next door called Happy Land. In 1958 it was reopened as Playland.

- China Creek takes its name from a group of Chinese-owned farms in the area near the turn of the century.

- Prior to the Depression of 1913, the Cedar Cottage neighbourhood featured a small roller coaster.

- Skinny dipping in Trout Lake is a civic tradition that dates back to Vancouver’s beginnings.

- Established in 1860, Brighton Beach (now New Brighten Park) was once a fashionable vacation spot for New Westminsterites looking for a seaside getaway.

- The Cedar Cottage neighbourhood gets its name from Cedar Cottage Brewery, built in 1901.

- Benjamin Tingley Roger, the owner of Roger’s sugar, struck a deal with the city in 1890 to build his refinery on the condition that he could enjoy 10 years of free water and 15 years of no taxes.

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VANCOUVER LEXICON | Crosstown

February 13, 2013 

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Crosstown | Place | Crosstown is a completely fabricated name for the condo-lined purgatory between Pender Street and Expo Boulevard. Only realtors refer to this area as Crosstown, which used to be railyards that the neighbouring viaducts were built to traverse.

Usage: “I live in Crosstown.” “Um, no you don’t.”

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The Emblematic Nature Of Your Neighbourhood’s Architecture

by Scott Daniel | The City is inviting Vancouverites to submit ideas for neighbourhood emblems. Or, to use the intensely urban verbiage the current council is known for, they want you to “Tag Your Hood“. This is all well and good, but when you travel east to west through this “city of neighbourhoods,” it seems there are already some pretty distinct architectural emblems that leave no doubt as to where you are…

Shaughnessy: Rounded Mansard Roof

I’d never noticed these peculiar roof adornments before…if you cycle the Cypress/Angus St. bike route through Shaughnessy, they’re everywhere. An understated, elegant type of opulence. Just like, I imagine, the residents of this neighbourhood perceive themselves. And they let in some light to refract through the chandeliers. Duh.

Kits: Put a Peak On It!

According to Exploring Vancouver, Kitsilano developed as a, “less expensive suburban alternative to the West End…with gabled roofs picturesque and not boring.”

In the 90′s, builders who wanted/needed their developments to conform to the neighbourhood character went overboard. They ran with the Put.A.Peak.On.It! approach. Some of them do fit, but more often than not the peaks add a lot of visual clutter and almost distract from the picturesque bungalow next door.

South Granville: A Cozy Pile of Bricks

South Granville has a bunch of warm brick apartment blocks. You can imagine the unique smell of the corridors even from outside. I always wanted to live in one, but at the same time, what’s with the No Balconies policy that they all seem to have? I know the weather can suck here, but gimme at least a juliet or something!

Fairview: Post-Tarp Pastel

The leaky condo craze that swept the city seemed to impact Fairview more than anywhere else. It’s said people would live and die by the phrase, “tarpé diem.” Now that the tarps are gone, we can re-join the 90′s nostalgia fetish that seems to be taking over at Urban Outfitters.

Yaletown: Shoebox City

People will pay almost any price to live in a shoebox if it’s close to the beautiful, the creative, the professional-hockey playing set. And it used to be the place to be!

The West End: Deco Apartments

Photo by Crankspanker

The West End is teeming with great examples of Art Deco apartment design. The colourful adornments, curved facades, chrome stoops, and focus on all that is horizontal make it a great place to walk and admire on your way to the pitch-n-putt.

Strathcona: Artist in Residence

The annual Culture Crawl invites Vancouverites to walk among the bohemian residents of Strathcona in their expressive habitats. Ancient grains soaking in the kitchen, surrealist sculptures in the workshop. All in a community-oriented, working class neighbourhood close to downtown.

East Van: Special

East Vancouver is experiencing a renaissance, and that’s a good thing. Stuff like This Is East Van and The revitalised Waldorf (and a million things besides) point to a fresh, vibrant art scene. But it can also get kind of annoying, what with all the sanctimonious East-Van-is-so-much-more-”real”-than-wherever-you-live chatter. Still, there are worse things than sanctimony.

What is more iconic than the East Van Special? Modern. Utilitarian. Real. Designers are starting to do some really interesting things with them. It’s such a great emblem…heck, there’s even an East Van Specials hockey team! And I can assure you, most of the players are quite sanctimonious.

The View From Your Window #55: Greetings From The Kiwi Coastal Wilds of Taranaki

January 28, 2011 

Reader “J.G.” | Oakura | Taranaki, New Zealand | 3:45pm | SHARE YOUR VIEW

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The View From Your Window #49

November 4, 2010 

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Reader “M.S.” | driving the Cowichan Valley | Vancouver Island, BC | 4:25pm | SHARE YOUR VIEW

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The View From Your Window #48

October 30, 2010 

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Reader “L.D.” | Kitsilano | Vancouver, BC | 4:00pm | SHARE YOUR VIEW

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Our “View From Your Window” Project Finally Gets A Gallery


Once a week for several months now we’ve been posting the photographs that reveal the views from your windows. Whether a back alley or a sandy beach, we’ve been stoked to see where you’ve been coming from. Rather than continuing to archive them individually (which was stupid), we’re now dropping all into a single gallery so you can – in a pinch – check out what your fellows are seeing at their most contemplative. Take a look below and share yours after the leap…

The View From Your Window is a project inspired by Andrew Sullivan’s compilations over at The Atlantic Monthly, wherein readers from around the world send in photographs of what they can see from their windows. It might seem an obtuse endeavor at first glance, but whenever we browse through the personal “Views” of our readership, we connect in a way that Twitter can’t. And so…we dig it. Share your view by emailing a photo (no less than 585px wide) with a note detailing the time it was taken and the neighbourhood to andrew [at] scoutmagazine [.ca].

The View From Your Window #47

October 26, 2010 

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Reader “A.G.” | Gastown | Vancouver, BC | 7:50am | SHARE YOUR VIEW

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The View From Your Window #46

October 24, 2010 

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Reader “J.M.” | Chinatown | Victoria, BC | 11:45am | SHARE YOUR VIEW

BROWSE READER VIEWS

The View From Your Window is a project inspired by Andrew Sullivan’s compilations over at The Atlantic Monthly, wherein readers from around the world send in photographs of what they can see from their windows. It might seem an obtuse endeavor at first glance, but whenever we browse through the personal “Views” of our readership, we are often able to connect to them in a way that transcends the worth of email and comment exchanges. And so…we dig it.

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