Downtown Eastside

12549533133_41fc6d7648_b

The Downtown Eastside (DTES) is a catch all descriptor for the neighbourhoods east of Cambie, west of Clark, north of Prior, and south of the waterfront. Technically, it includes Gastown, Strathcona, Chinatown, and Railtown/Japantown, but we’ve separated each of these for their individual characters and are treating the DTES here much as the zeitgeist does: as the slowly shrinking collection of blocks east of Carrall, west of Jackson, north of Pender, and south of Cordova. If you have a different interpretation of the landscape and its borders, good for you!

Sadly, it’s safe to say that most Canadian’s view the DTES as less as a community and more of a sensational eyesore; an urban blight box crammed with a loose association of kid-gloved petty criminals, dealers, addicts, and people with mental health issues operating in and around bed bug-infested Single Room Occupancy hotels, daily dodging a very real minefield of violence and disease in often third world living conditions.

That might appear to be superficially true, but the reality is a lot more complicated and nuanced. The DTES is not, for example, “Canada’s poorest postal code”, as it is so often claimed. Neither is it Vancouver’s most transient neighbourhood (that distinction goes to the West End). And if you ask a resident if they feel like they belong to a genuine community, the answer will be a resounding “yes”.

A fierce sense of belonging would naturally coalesce and strengthen in any neighbourhood that was so institutionally demonized, referred to constantly from within and without as “a huge problem”. By policing it in a petty and punitive fashion, insulting it passive aggressively (or fully in the face), trying to price its residents out, or even pretending that it doesn’t exist, the people who see it as an abomination (or rather as a financial opportunity) have only made the community more suspicious of (and resistant to) change.

To wit, “The Downtown Eastside needs to be destroyed,” an editorial in The Province newspaper has declared. “The more residents who are pushed out, the better. It is unconscionable that such a hellhole should exist in a province as wealthy as B.C., in a country as advanced as Canada.” Now, if someone wrote that kind of trash about you and where you lived, you’d likely get your back up, too. Because not everyone who lives on the DTES fits the hysterical stereotype, and those that do are not so bereft of humanity as to not notice when someone tries to rob them of what little humanity they have left.

Indeed, if there’s anything to celebrate on the DTES, it’s that in spite of the high instance of mental illness; homelessness; the AIDS and Hepatitis C epidemics; heroin, crack cocaine, and crystal meth; a long and horrifying history of sexual abuse (before Robert Pickton, violence against First Nations women was treated as a fact of life on the DTES); and the way in which the rest of the city – not to mention the provincial and federal governments – views it through the prism of a largely unsympathetic corporate media; the DTES remains a strong, vibrant, and essential facet of Vancouver that – to its eternal credit – isn’t afraid to stand up for itself.

While other neighbourhoods protest against comparatively first-world affronts like bike lines, casinosart installations, high rises, and funeral homes, residents of the DTES’ dwindling core demonstrate for vital services and in opposition to real or perceived threats against their ability to remain residents. They don’t always protest wisely (targeting small businesses is a nonsensical exercise in quixotic futility), but that they organize and advance a message that needs to be heard by all citizens despite often crippling circumstances is as commendable as it is all too often tragically ignored.

Looking around the DTES today it’s sometimes hard to imagine that it was the beating heart of Vancouver less than a century ago. The banks, the newspapers, the courts, even City Hall once called it home. But while it’s important to remember that the neighbourhood wasn’t always as it is now, romancing the DTES’ past or speculating on its future belittles a present crisis that doesn’t have much in the way of room for halcyon reminiscences or high hopes. The area needs help, and it needs help now; help that new condos and businesses can’t directly give. It requires assistance from the provincial and federal governments in the form of new, affordable housing, a long overdue increase to the welfare shelter allowance of $375 per month (there has only been only one increase since 1992), the non-politicization of harm reduction programs, and – in a hurry – a serious approach to mental health care that includes new facilities, preferably located in whichever affluent neighbourhood complains about them the most.

Change on the DTES is a good thing, and we’re all for it, just so long as it’s for the people who already call it home.

current-poll

What's your favourite place for a beer on the DTES?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

the-colour-palette

dtespalette

Left to right: Pat’s Lager at Pat’s Pub in the Patricia Hotel; Victorian era purple/blue glass basement prisms; Ovaltine Cafe neon tri-colour; the grass of Oppenheimer Park; Carnegie Community Centre; duo of road colours at Main & Hastings; No. 5 Orange; dormant Salvation Army building exterior at Gore & Main; VPD blue; needle tip orange.

here-you-will-find

12625699133_d696c6b967_c

INSITE, THE CONTROVERSIAL BUT LIFE-SAVING SAFE INJECTION SITE
THE SAD, FORLORN EMPTY SHELLS OF THE ONLY AND THE LOGGER’S SOCIAL CLUB
THE RAMP CAM AT THE SMILING BUDDHA SKATEPARK
A COMPETITIVE MARKET FOR STREET CIGARETTES
THE GOOD WORKS OF THE PORTLAND HOTEL SOCIETY
THE INCOMPARABLE INTERIOR OF THE OVALTINE CAFE
BARGAIN HUNTERS COMBING THE PIGEON PARK STREET MARKET
THE CRUEL AND UNUSUAL ASSHOLERY OF SOME OF THE STREET-LEVEL DRUG DEALERS
A NETWORK OF ALLEYWAYS THAT ARE BEST AVOIDED
SWEET DUDS AT COMMUNITY & THE FROCK SHOPPE
OLD, RESPECTFUL GUYS WHO YELL “KIDS ON THE BLOCK” WHENEVER PEOPLE WALK PAST WITH CHILDREN

what-to-eat-and-drink

12513227305_c8c1d99a27_z

KOREAN PANCAKES AT THE DUNLEVY SNACKBAR
CHICKPEA BURGERS AND KALE CAESARS AT RAINIER PROVISIONS
BEEF DIP SANDWICHES AND HOUSE LAGER AT PAT’S PUB
AN OUTSTANDING BEER SELECTION AT THE ALIBI ROOM
BEAN TO BAR AND CUP CHOCOLATE & COFFEE AT EAST VAN ROASTERS
GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICHES AT THE OVALTINE CAFE
AVO ON TOAST WITH EARL GREY TEA AT NELSON THE SEAGULL
JERK FRIES & RUM FLIGHTS AT CALABASH
PRETZEL SAMBOS & BEER FLIGHTS AT BITTER TASTING ROOM
CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE AWFUL AWFUL AT SAVE ON MEATS
CRISPY CHICKEN W/ FRIED RICE AND THE VEGGIE PHO AT HANOI PHO
CHICKEN WINGS & VITELLO TONNATO AT PIDGIN

cool-things-of-note

11958410373_6e5713b0f6_z

- In 1917, the Food Floor in Woodwards at Hastings & Abbott was the largest of its kind in the world.

- Vancouver’s City Hall was formerly located next to Carnegie Centre at Main and Hastings.

- The bell at St. James’ Church (then on Powell and Main) was, for many, the warning siren of the Great Fire in 1886; the melted remnants can be found at the Vancouver Museum.

- The First Nations name for Crab Park (Portside) is Lucklucky, meaning “Grove of Beautiful Trees”. The name “Crab” originates from the Create a Real Available Beach (CRAB) initiative by DTES residents in the early 1980s.

- In 1989 Vancouver launched North America’s first needle exchange program in an effort to promote harm reduction for residents of the Downtown Eastside. In 2003 North America’s only legal supervised injection site, Insite, was founded.

- The multi-height, 45 ft. wide half-pipe at the Smiling Buddha was built using the bones of several historic Vancouver skate ramps, including the original Richmond Skate Ranch and the Expo ’86 vert ramp.

things-we've-seen

VANCOUVER DETAIL #283: Who Knows The Origins Of The Mysterious ‘Brite Cafe’ Sign?

You may have seen this “Brite Cafe” sign while it was sitting on the floor at Rainier Provisions in Gastown. It was found in the basement of an old building at East Hastings and Heatley but its origins are unknown to us. We’ve googled the hell out of it, but to no avail. If any of our heritage-minded readers can solve the mystery, please let us know in the comments below! Cheers and thanks!

EVERYTHING SEEN IN VANCOUVER

SEEN IN VANCOUVER #431: A Moving Film On The Downtown Eastside’s ‘Rainier Hotel’

Colin Askey, a filmmaker and former Portland Hotel Society staffer, recently debuted A Long Journey Home: The Rainier Story. It’s a moving short film on the impact of the Rainier Hotel and the people who have had their lives turned around by the facility’s long-term addiction treatments and clinical care. Sadly, its modus operandi and funding have been up in the air since Christmas. Give it a watch, and let The Tyee provide context as needed. We encourage our readers to send letters of support to The Rainier via savetherainier@phs.ca, and to keep up to date with its goings on through their Twtter @rainierhotel.

EVERYTHING SEEN IN VANCOUVER

DINER: Inside Stumptown’s Training Day At The Highly Anticipated “Rainier Provisions”

by Andrew MorrisonRainier Provisions, the long anticipated new delicatessen from Gastown/DTES restaurateur Sean Heather (see also Salt Tasting Room, Bitter, Judas Goat, The Irish Heather, et cetera), is – as you can see from the shots below – inching closer to opening day. Stumptown Coffee’s Matt Pfaff was up from Seattle yesterday to help train the staff, and the finishing touches were being done to the decor. Very shortly we’ll see the retail shelves filled with all manner of foodstuffs and the display cases stocked with a selection of Spanish, French, Italian, and UK cheeses, several types of cured meat from East Hastings’ Moccia & Urbani, awesome D-Original sausages, eggs fresh from Rabbit River Farms, and other tasty bits besides. Service will also see daily bangers, a gluten free pasta, vegan chili, and a roast of sorts (eg. beef, porchetta). Rainier Provisions will be licensed, too, so expect bourbon to rule with 18 different types supplemented by six beers on tap (including growler size) and a couple of reds and whites by the glass. Opening day should be between the end of Dine Out and Valentine’s Day, which would put it almost 13 months behind its original January 2012 target date (shit happens). They’re aiming specifically for the 9th of February, with fingers crossed.

THEN (SEPTEMBER 2011)

NOW (JANUARY 2013)

ALL ANTICIPATED OPENINGS