GOODS | “The Biltmore” To Welcome Rich Hope & His Blue Rich Rangers On March 15

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward Street in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward Street in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The GOODS from The Biltmore Cabaret

Vancouver, BC | Hidden Charms is pleased to announce a very special performance. Rich Hope and His Blue Rich Rangers after a lengthy hiatus are returning to the stage to perform – for one night only – the iconic Byrds album Sweetheart of the Rodeo in it’s entirety. Now hear it live and in the flesh as the Rangers rev it up. Post LP performance will feature the usual assortment of Rangers barroom rockers and honky tonk hits to round out the night on the dance floor. Learn more after the jump… Read more

NEVER HEARD OF IT | The Panaderia Latina Bakery’s Magnificent Lunchtime Sugar High

Never Heard Of It is a new series that explores Vancouver’s many informal hole-in-the-wall eateries.

by Ken Tsui | Sitting down for lunch at the highly aromatic Panaderia Latina Bakery means you voluntarily surround yourself with canned peppers, chili sauces, South American sodas, and display cases loaded with cakes, pastries and meringues held together with enough dulce de leche to induce a serious contact sugar­ rush. It’s no small wonder that hungry diners get the anticipatory shakes when they watch the Chilean mother and daughter duo crank out the goods in the small kitchen. But before indulging in a slice of densely rich tres leches, flakey milhoja, or the granddaddy of Chilean desserts, torta hojaldra, temper your sweet tooth with a satisfyingly messy chacarero (a monstrous Chilean beef sandwich loaded with green beans and tomato) that arrives hot off the grill, or at least with a freshly baked empanada. All of the traditional Latin savouries and sweets are made daily from scratch, and everything is brought to the table with pride by people who make you feel right at home.

Panaderia Latina Bakery | 4906 Joyce Street | Vancouver, BC | 604-439-­1414

READ MORE GLUTTONY STORIES

HEADS UP | Ken Tsui, Rain City Chronicles, And Bestie Set For Kicks At The Alpen Club

RCC_DL

On March 22nd, Rain City Chronicles, Ken Tsui and Bestie join forces to celebrate all things German with DAS LEXIKON!

Through storytelling and supper, Das Lexikon is a fun-filled night of German appreciation infused with Krautrock, German beer, entertaining stories inspired by German vocabulary handpicked by Rain City Chronicles and a delicious bratwurst dinner by Bestie. And what better place to have it unfold than the Vancouver Alpen Club, an institution with a century’s worth of local German history.

After staging a memorable two night pop-up restaurant in a school cafeteria this past November for Rain City Chronicles’ “Tales from Public School” show series, edible pop-up producer Ken Tsui continues his partnership with Rain City Chronicles for Das Lexikon. In working with Lizzy Karp, the event transforms a culturally treasured space into a playful and energetic experience unlike any other in the city.

newgif

Rain City Chronicles, Vancouver’s premiere storytelling night, are pairing a diverse roster of Vancouverites with a collection of unique German words that spark captivating stories. From tales inspired by moments of “schadenfreude” (the pleasure derived from someone’s misfortune) to “waldeinsamkeit” (forest solitude), the evening revels in the idiosyncrasies of the German language.

With a casual, friendly and fun approach, the local German street food wunderkinds of Chinatown, Dane Brown, Clinton McDougall and chef Colin Johnson will serve up their take on the traditional German supper. Bestie’s dinner for Das Lexikon is a unique menu that celebrates the fundamentals of German comfort food, served one night only and created exclusively for the event. And yes, vegetarians are welcome.

Filling one of Vancouver’s most unique spaces with word nerds and bratwurst devotees, Das Lexikon will be a raucous, hilarious and delectable night out. Storytellers, musical guest and menu details to be announced the week of March 10, 2014. Get tickets and details after the jump… Read more

Hastings-Sunrise

hastings-sunrise

Playland Crowds at The PNETacofino Commissary | TamaleLeeside ©ScoutPNE Wooden Roller Coaster TracksRed WagonSesame Miso cookies  at Basho CafeTacofino kitchen audibles

Hastings-Sunrise is an ethnically diverse working class neighbourhood that stretches from Clark to Boundary Road and from Nanaimo to the waterfront. It’s marked by its dizzying array of ethnic restaurants and independent shops, large and heavily utilised parks, large house lots, and a family-anchored sense of community. East Hastings is its main commercial and transport artery.

the-colour-palette

hastings-sunrise

In Hasting Sunrise at the moment (our HOOD palettes are ever-changing), we’re seeing the sidewalk fruit stand tricolour in front of Donald’s Market; the hard plastic turquoise slide in Pandora Park; the awning of Red Wagon; the neon “boot” signage above Dayton’s Boots; the green branding and shimmer flags above the J.J. Motor Car lot; Church’s Chicken tri-colour; slate awning at Gourmet Warehouse; summer sky at dusk from a Playland rollercoaster; good pair of jeans score at Value Village; mosaic frontage of the Star Tile building.

here-you-will-find

9615921003_f450e14364_b

PEOPLE EATING DEEP FRIED FOOD AND THEN GOING ON RIDES AT PLAYLAND
OLD GUY TENNIS GAMES IN PANDORA PARK
22,000 SQFT (TEMPORARY) COMMUNITY GARDENS IN THE 2500 BLOCK OF EAST HASTINGS
THE OLD REGULARS IN THE RED BOOTHS AT MASTER CHEF CAFE
CHERRY BLOSSOMS MATCHING THE PINK SPIRE OF THE ST. DAVID OF WALES CHURCH
WEEKEND BRUNCH LINE-UPS AT THE RED WAGON CAFE
THE HASTINGS AND LEESIDE SKATEPARKS
SORRENTO BARBERSHOP’S BEAUTIFUL TYPEFACE
THE BENCHMARK COMMUNITY GATHERING AREA AT KAMLOOPS AND EAST HASTINGS
KITSCH AND COLLECTIBLES AT THE MAD PICKER
EAST PENDER ‘S TREE “BOULEVARD” BETWEEN VICTORIA DRIVE AND TEMPLETON DRIVE

what-to-eat-and-drink

7693331246_f3d34169ff_b

FUNDIDO TATER TOTS AT TACOFINO COMMISSARY
CHINESE BBQ CHICKEN THIGHS FROM SY FARM MARKET
WELSH RARE BITS FROM THE BRIGHTON
PALESTINIAN MUJADARRAH AT TAMAM
CLASSIC ROMAN-STYLE (EGG & GUANCIALE) SPAGHETTI CARBONARA AT CAMPAGNOLO ROMA
PAIN AU CHOCOLATE AT EAST VILLAGE BAKERY
DEEP FRIED CRAB AND SEAFOOD CONGEE AT JAMES ON HASTINGS
BBQ PORK WONTON NOODLE SOUP AT PENNY RESTAURANT
THE “SOPA DE PATA” AT EL PULGARCITO
PATTY MELTS AND $4.95 BREAKFASTS AT THE SLOCAN
LOOSE TEA FROM THE SMALLEST TEA HOUSE IN BC
LAKSA & ROTI FROM LAKSA KING
POLISH FARMER’S SAUSAGE FROM POLONIA SAUSAGE HOUSE
SCOTCH PIES FROM RIO FRIENDLY MEATS
REUBEN SANDWICHES AT RED WAGON CAFE
CHERRY WOOD-SMOKED BACON FROM WINDSOR MEATS

cool-things-of-note

12664928993_b55dd48dfd_b

- The Hastings Townsite, as it was originally known, didn’t join the City of Vancouver until 1910 – twenty-four years after incorporation.

- Prior to the launch of Rogers Arena in 1995, Hastings-Sunrise was the home of the Vancouver Canucks. They played at the Pacific Coliseum at Hastings and Renfrew. The iconic building witnessed two (ultimately unsuccessful) runs to the Stanley Cup Finals by the Canucks, first in 1982 against the New York Islanders, and again in 1994 against the New York Rangers.

- The city’s first road, hotel, wharf, post office, and museum, among other distinctions, were established in the Hastings-Sunrise area.

- The Pacific National Exhibition (PNE) was established after residents lobbied for more “wholesome” area attractions other than the Hastings Racetrack.

- Hastings St. got its name not from the 1066 Battle of Hastings but from the original Hastings Townsite, which was named in honour of Admiral George Fowler Hastings, a 50 year veteran of the Royal Navy.

- In early 2012, the Hastings North Business Improvement Association saw fit to rename the core 12 block stretch of East Hastings as “The East Village”. They did this autocratically without consulting residents or non-HNMIA member businesses, and City Hall gave them permission to hang banners declaring the “rebrand” from lamp posts. The move was/is widely considered to be imperious folly, with next to no one using the new name. The area will forever be known as Hastings-Sunrise.

- The sheltered, DIY Leeside Skatepark under the Cassiar Connector was named posthumously for its original DIY builder, local artist/skateboarder Lee Matasi, who was shot to death in 2005.

- In 2012, the Hastings North Business Improvement Association attempted to rebrand a large section of the Hastings-Sunrise Area as the “East Village”.

- The Hastings Racetrack is rumoured to have used old cars from the PNE Demolition Derby to level the 19-foot slope difference when it was renovated in 1965.

things-we've-seen

———————————————–

Main Street

mainstreet

Main Street ©ScoutIMG_2882Acorn | 3395 Main | Brian and ShiraLoner Society of Main St. holds a community spirit day at GeneAntisocial 2Main St. Farmers MarketMain Street - City Centre

In our breakdown of Vancouver’s neighbourhoods, we count Main Street as a north-south linear amalgam of Mount Pleasant/Riley Park/Little Mountain, a contiguous high street entity (including 2-3 residential and industrial blocks on its east-west peripheries) from Prior St. all the way to 41st Ave. It boasts beautiful parks both small and large, a dizzying variety of retail shops (many of them used/vintage), a handful of art galleries, a torrent of new breweries, good record stores, a litter of interesting independent restaurants that run the cuisine gamut (including 24hr fried chicken), quality cafes/hangouts,, one legendary live music venue and another in the making, bingo games, a happening legion, and even a farmer’s market. Known as much for its cool factor as for its diversity and down to earth accessibility, Main Street – in our estimation of its modern borders – is as honest a cross-sectioned representation of Vancouver’s cultural promise as you’ll find.

the-colour-palette

railtownpalette

City Centre Motor Hotel quad-colour; exterior of the new Fox Cabaret; red signage of Pizzeria Farina; pool table felt in the Ivanhoe Pub; the polished concrete floor at Gene; 49th Parallel Coffee turquoise; takeaway box from Lucky’s Doughnuts; neon blue exterior signage at The Cascade Room; beer battered halloumi at The Acorn; “Fall Back” session stout at Brassneck Brwery; Red Truck Brewery’s red truck; the facing stones of Heritage Hall.

here-you-will-find

IMG_3211

COMMUNITY EVENTS AT HISTORIC HERITAGE HALL
STILL OPERABLE TELEPHONE BOOTHS
THE ALWAYS INTERESTING VANCOUVER SPECIAL
GIGS AT THE BILTMORE AND THE FOX CABARET
A DOZEN VINTAGE CLOTHING SHOPS OF VARYING DEGREES OF WORTHINESS
FRESH PRODUCE (AND SAUSAGES) AT THE MAIN STREET STATION FARMER’S MARKET
CAREFULLY CURATED VINYL COLLECTIONS AT RED CAT AND DANDELION EMPORIUM
GAMES OF BAR RULES POOL AT THE IVANHOE
STACKS OF GOOD, REASONABLY PRICED BOOKS AT PULP FICTION
THE INTANGIBLY EXCELLENT HASTY MARKET
VINTAGE MS. PACMAN AT ANTISOCIAL SKATEBOARD SHOP

what-to-eat-and-drink

IMG_4086

PAIN AU CHOCOLATE AT LE MARCHE ST. GEORGE
SPAGHETTI POMODORO AT CAMPAGNOLO
TURKISH FIGS & BRIE BENNY AT SLICKETY JIM’S
FINOCHIONNA PIZZA AT PIZZERIA FARINA
TAN TAN NOODLE WITH MEAT SAUCE AND GREEN ONION CAKES AT LONG’S NOODLE HOUSE
FISH & CHIPS AT THE FISH COUNTER
BRASIED KALE & SAUSAGE PIZZA AT DON’T ARGUE
BEER BATTERED HALLOUMI AT THE ACORN
TURKEY DINNER AT HELEN’S GRILL
DIRTY BURGER AT CAMP UPSTAIRS
FRIED CHICKEN WITH PICKLED VEGGIES AT BURDOCK & CO.
COFFEE AND THE SUNDAY NEW YORK TIMES AT GENE CAFE
BACON, WAFFLES, AND BEER (YER DAMN RIGHT!) AT 33 ACRES
TRADITIONAL FRENCH CRULLER AT LUCKY’S DOUGHNUTS

the-ghost-hood

In conversations about Mount Pleasant these days, the old “Brewery Creek” moniker is being increasingly employed on account of all the new breweries that have arrived in recent years. But what exactly is the significance of the name? It’s important to note that although it’s generally thought of as synonymous with the Mount Pleasant neighbourhood, the “Brewery Creek” distinction refers to a particular stretch of waterway that was integral to the growth and economic development of the area. Long before white settlers arrived, this expansive region was a popular harvesting location for First Nations. It would later become an important economic sector for new businesses thanks to its flowing natural resource.

The patch of land that became known as Mount Pleasant was originally shrouded in dense, dark rainforest. The creek that drained this forest into the salty waters of False Creek sat at the bottom of a large ravine that was open to the sky. It offered an abundance of flowers, berries, and other plants used by First Nations for medicine and food. The (now lost) waterway began near where Mountain View Cemetery is located today. Water flowed downhill just west of modern-day Fraser Street to a marshy, dammed area near 14th Avenue (Tea Swamp Park). From here, the creek flowed down the Mount Pleasant hillside, following a northeastern path alongside a First Nations trail (near where Kingsway cuts across Main Street), and continuing into the eastern waters of False Creek (which have since been filled in) near Terminal Avenue.

In 1867, the creek area in Mount Pleasant became Vancouver’s first piped waterway, delivering water by flume to Gastown – then the center of the city – and the boilers at Captain Edward Stamp’s Mill near the foot of Dunlevy (later known as the Hastings Sawmill).

The Brewery Creek region was defined by its open landscape, its distinct flora and fauna, and the numerous businesses that followed the path of the waterway – including several slaughterhouses, the nearby Vancouver Tannery, and an assortment of local beverage-makers that used the creek to power their water wheels: the San Francisco Brewery (later known as the Red Star Brewery), Mainland Brewery, Landsdowne Brewery, Lion Brewery, and the Thorpe & Co. Soda Water Works.

In 1889, Charles Gottfried Doering, a Saxony native, established the Vancouver Brewery along the Creek. Two years later, he partnered with Otto Marstrand and renamed the business as the Doering & Marstrand Brewing Co. It soon developed into the largest local industry, with several overseas export routes. In 1902, the successful company merged with the city’s first brewery, the Red Cross Brewery located near the Burrard Inlet, to become Vancouver Breweries Ltd. Eventually, the company upgraded to accommodate new technologies and a larger production space, and in 1904 Vancouver Breweries built an expansion at 280 East 6th Avenue.

The historic “Fell’s Candy Factory” signage on the exposed brick exterior of the building denotes one of the variety of other business that once operated here. These included a dairy, an ice plant, and a warehouse. Today it’s known simply as the Brewery Creek Building. The nearby Mission Revival-style building on 7th Ave (formerly the Vancouver Brewery Garage) was recently updated to offices and modern artist spaces. Main Street’s present-day Cascade Room takes its name from the Vancouver Brewery’s flagship beer: Cascade, “The Beer Without a Peer”.

In 1904, two of Brewery Creek’s slaughterhouses near Scotia and 1st demolished in order to expand the local railway systems; the flow of commerce began to extend uphill into Mount Pleasant as an extension of the development “downtown”. Circa 1910, 9th Avenue and Westminster Avenue were renamed Broadway and Main Street, respectively, to echo the growing departure from British influence towards a more modern “Americanized” character. Mount Pleasant was poised to become a major economic hub, and though this vision was never fully realized, the “Main Street” distinction was meant to attribute a commercial flair to the area.

While False Creek remained an industrial area into the 1950s, Mount Pleasant grew into a flourishing residential suburb, with plenty of historic homes and churches to prove it. Many homes and businesses that were built on top of the Brewery Creek ravine feature full sub-ground basements – a rare commodity for most buildings in the area. However, in the ’70s and ’80s, industrialization crept south and the area became less and less desirable for suburban homeowners. During the post-war period the area became home to a sizeable working-class and immigrant population, and a steady rise in crime and urban decay caused a shift in the neighbourhood’s reputation. The evolving needs of the community meant that preserving Brewery Creek and the ravine area as a resource was not a priority.

In 1922, the Masonic Knights of Pythias Hall had been built right over the creek at 8th and Scotia. This unique heritage building, now known as the Western Front, was purchased in 1973 by a group of artists and transformed into an internationally known live/work and performance space. Subsequently, the Brewery Creek area transformed, particularly over the 1990’s, into a collection of cafes, residences, and community spaces devoted to the growing artist population. That said, while Mount Pleasant experienced a cultural resurgence, Brewery Creek faded away.

Remnants of this historic landscape are still noticeable if you look close enough. While the streets north of 12th Avenue in Mount Pleasant are bumpy and unsettled (a telltale sign of swampy land underneath), the streets on the sloped northern side offered a direct cascading route down into False Creek that can be traced along the low points of the east-west streets. On 5th Avenue, between Scotia and Brunswick Street, a small ravine-type park was created to pay tribute to the famous waterway, and thousands of years of First Nations presence and prosperity in this area are recognized by the Native Education College on 5th Avenue and Scotia. Additionally, a number of historic bronze cairns by Bruce MacDonald were installed by the Brewery Creek Historical Society (founded in 1988) to follow the original northbound pathway of the creek.

The creek and its original breweries are long gone, and the historic industries have been replaced with a variety of residential buildings – including the 1992 conversion of the Vancouver Brewery Building into artist studios and trendy apartments. Recently, the spirit of this area’s heritage has been revived, thanks to a small number of new local breweries popping up along the hillside. In keeping with the character of the Brewery Creek area, their focus on locally made quality products provides sippable glimpses into the historic industry that sparked a citywide legacy, and offers a return to the roots of this ever-evolving neighbourhood.

cool-things-of-note

IMG_9167-

- Main Street was formerly known as Westminster Avenue. Local merchants requested a change in 1910 to help establish a commercial, cosmopolitan character.

- The area of Mount Pleasant attracted several breweries from 1888 to 1912, many of which used water from the local creeks.

- The Lee Building at Main and Broadway was the first skyscraper outside of Vancouver’s downtown core.

- Mount Pleasant takes its name from the Irish birthplace of the wife of H.V. Edmonds, a New Westminster municipal clerk with extensive property titles in the area.

- The Main and Broadway area is recognized as Vancouver’s first suburb, which developed following the nearby construction of the Kingsway and Main Street intersection in the 1890s.

things-we've-seen

———————————————–

East Van

IMG_8624

Gene Coffee | Main StreetKen Lum's East Van CrossThe Black LodgeEast Side TracksEast Van VintageSalvation Army Building Hastings Street | EastGuacamole at La Mezcalaria

“East Van” is an umbrella term referring to all of the neighbourhoods east of Ontario Street. It includes Mount Pleasant, Riley Park, Main Street, Grandview-Woodlands, Killarney, Kensington-Cedar Cottage, Hastings Sunrise, The Fraserhood, Champlain Heights, Fraserview Victoria, Sunset, and Renfrew Collingwood. It is a huge swathe of land; largely residential (with some pockets of industrial), massively multi-cultural, and predominately working class.

the-colour-palette

eastvanpalette

In East Van at the moment (our HOOD palettes are ever-changing), we’re seeing the seven core shades of the Trout Lake Community Centre; the late dusky sky that signals the start of the Illuminares Lantern Festival; Vancouver Giants tri-colour; the September grass in McSpadden Park; the little yellow Fiat in front of Via Tevere; the green doors of the Cedar Cottage Coffee House; the gravel pathways around New Brighton Park; lipstick red on the Burlesque dancers at The Biltmore; the North Shore mountains from Clinton Park; Punjabi Market signage.

here-you-will-find

7360716300_c0f547566f_b

A BLUE COLLAR WORK ETHIC
LEESIDE, A SKATEPARK BUILT BY SKATEBOARDERS
INTENSE GAMES OF CRICKET
THE INCOMPARABLE 60′S STYLE 2400 MOTEL
THE AWESOME ODDITIES AT HACKSPACE
THE TROUT LAKE FARMERS MAKET
TOURS OF PURDY’S CHOCOLATE FACTORY
TWILIGHT LANTERN PROCESSIONS
BBQ’S AT NEW BRIGHTON PARK
INNER CITY KIDS WITH A PASSION FOR WRITING
A GREAT PLACE TO RENT A DRILL

what-to-eat-and-drink

IMG_5404

LATE NIGHT DONUTS AND PUPUSAS AT DUFFINS
BUFALA MOZZARELLA FROM BOSA FOODS
SATURDAY MORNING CINNAMON BUNS AT JJ BEAN ON POWELL
RAMEN BURGERS AT THE HAWKER’S MARKET
PRE-RACE BUFFET AT HASTINGS RACECOURSE
CARDAMOM INFUSED HONEY FROM MELLIFERA BEES
24 HOUR DOSAS AT HOUSE OF DOSAS

cool-things-of-note

The Alley Chairs project is curated by Nicole Arnett, an invaluable friend to Scout. It documents/invents the dramas surrounding the abandoned alleyway chairs and sofas of East Vancouver.

cool-things-of-note

3970605491_8ab780329e_z

- In 1929 the Pacific Nation Exhibition (PNE) opened an amusement park next door called Happy Land. In 1958 it was reopened as Playland.

- China Creek takes its name from a group of Chinese-owned farms in the area near the turn of the century.

- Prior to the Depression of 1913, the Cedar Cottage neighbourhood featured a small roller coaster.

- Skinny dipping in Trout Lake is a civic tradition that dates back to Vancouver’s beginnings.

- Established in 1860, Brighton Beach (now New Brighten Park) was once a fashionable vacation spot for New Westminsterites looking for a seaside getaway.

- The Cedar Cottage neighbourhood gets its name from Cedar Cottage Brewery, built in 1901.

- Benjamin Tingley Roger, the owner of Roger’s sugar, struck a deal with the city in 1890 to build his refinery on the condition that he could enjoy 10 years of free water and 15 years of no taxes.

things-we've-seen

———————————————–

GOODS | Campagnolo ROMA Pairs With R&B Brewing Co. For “No Guts, No Glory” Supper

February 28, 2014 

Campagnolo Roma is located at 2297 East Hastings Street in Vancouver, BC | 604-569-0456 | www.campagnoloroma.com

The GOODS from Campagnolo Roma

Vancouver, BC | On Wednesday, March 12, chef de cuisine Joachim Hayward will prepare a family style feast for the offal-curious paired with two unique cask conditioned beers created by R&B’s head brewer Todd Graham especially for this event.

Campagnolo ROMA started Quinto Quarto in 2011 with the intention of honouring the Roman tradition of cooking offal. Quinto Quarto literally means the fifth quarter and refers to the less desirable cuts of meat from an animal. These dinners pay homage to the butchers of Rome’s Testaccio district who kept the fifth quarter for themselves and initiated this style of cooking.

Nose-to-tail dining at its best, Quinto Quarto offers a rare opportunity to thoroughly enjoy the odd bits. Diners can expect crispy pig’s ears with preserved green tomatoes, Fraser Valley duck cooked three ways including duck heart tartare, Pacific octopus, lamb neck, bone marrow, seasonal vegetables, white chocolate with caramelized crackling, and of course, soft serve ice cream and more. Tickets are $79.50 inclusive of dinner, cask beer, tax and gratuity. Guests will sit at communal tables and take part in this traditional family-style meal. Get all the delicious details after the jump… Read more

AWESOME THING WE ATE #916 | A Sweet Lunch Set At New Basho On East Hastings

February 20, 2014 

basho

A visit to the brand new Basho Japanese cafe at 2007 East Hastings St. today saw a Veggie Lunch Set that blew our socks off. It included a cup of thick yam soup; a delicious, lightly dressed (tofu?) green salad with walnuts; a pickled vegetable, broccoli, cucumber, carrot, and avocado rice bowl; a steaming cup of light and simple green tea; and an assortment of matcha cookies. Not bad for  for $10.50! If this is the first time you’ve heard of this place, take a click here or browse through the gallery below.

Basho | 2007 East Hastings | 604-428-6276 | www.bashocafe.com

MORE AWESOME THINGS WE ATE

DRINKER | East Van’s “Bomber Brewing” Is Ready To Fill Its First Growlers Tomorrow!

February 13, 2014 

bomber

by Chuck Hallett | And you thought 2013 was a big year for breweries. 2014 is off to a bang, and not quite two months in we’re already welcoming the opening of our second local brewery (the first was Black Kettle of North Van in early January). Now, crouched at the starting blocks in East Van and awaiting their official Friday opening, we have Bomber Brewing.

Bomber Brewing, with it’s connection to BierCraft via founder cum brewer Don Farion, joins Vancouver’s two other existing brewery/restaurant duos: Brassneck/Alibi Room and Parallel 49/St. Augustine’s. Between those two examples, Bomber is a bit closer to Parallel 49 in terms of both beer styles (session-able beer sold by the six-pack), and in terms of raw location (1488 Adanac).

You read that right. Eschewing the rapidly growing, painfully hip and increasingly crowded Mount Pleasant/Brewery Creek neighbourhood for the more industrial confines of East Strathcona, Bomber is the first to open of three planned breweries clustered around Venables and Clark.

They join relative veterans Powell Street, Parallel 49, Coal Harbour and actual veteran Storm Brewing a short distance away to form a tight, walkable pod of breweries that some are already calling Yeast Van.

Tucked deep in the belly of their warehouse at 1488 Adanac is a cosy, darkened tasting room in which plentiful use of natural wood and stone contrast sharply with the cold, brightly lit steel fermenters on the other side of a large glass window, in which the beer is made. It’s a great place to whittle away an afternoon, or four.

Bomber opens Friday February 14th 2-7pm for growler fills (1 & 2 L) and six-pack/bottle sales, with the tasting lounge following shortly on Monday February 17th with their regular hours of 11am-11pm. Beer lineup at launch will be their IPA, ESB, Stout and Belgian Blonde (Blonde in growler fills only).

IMG_5569IMG_5573IMG_5589IMG_8505IMG_8492IMG_8482IMG_5642IMG_5639IMG_5636IMG_5632IMG_5628IMG_5627IMG_5624IMG_5620IMG_5614IMG_5613IMG_5611IMG_5608IMG_5604IMG_5601IMG_5600IMG_5597IMG_5595IMG_5587IMG_5586IMG_5584IMG_5576IMG_5567

DRINK MORE BEER STORIES

FOREIGN RESTAURANT PORN | Denmark’s “Namnam” Should Land In The Fraserhood

February 12, 2014 

01-Facade_nam_nam-e1350035078953

by Andrew Morrison | Foreign Restaurant Porn looks at covet-worthy restaurants from parts afar and uses them to plug holes – geographically or conceptually - in Vancouver’s own restaurant landscape. This week we’re dreaming about Namnam, an 88 seat Singaporean eatery in Copenhagen, and wishing it was located in the Fraserhood. We’ve gotten word that a developer is looking into retro-fitting the 3,000 sqft Excel Tire Centre at 615 Kingsway and is currently on the lookout for a restaurant/lounge tenant. That’s the same block as Los Cuervos, Les Faux Bourgeois, and Matchstick Coffee, and right across the street from the very photogenic Black Lodge.

Why do we want this? Well, chiefly because “build-to-suit” opportunities that are tucked away in our neighbourhoods don’t come around every day, and we can imagine in our minds eye an outdoor patio with hanging lights in colourful lanterns strung across it high above the tables (explore above for the visual). Go ahead, close your eyes and imagine it. Smell the beef rendang and proper laksas mingling in wafts on warm summer nights and taste the cold bottles of Tiger beer. We’ll settle simply for an operator who gives a damn, but c’mon…a Namnam-esque joint with reasonable price points would just kill it here.

MORE FOREIGN RESTAURANT PORN

GOODS | Biltmore Turning Up The Romance For This Friday Night’s “East Van Soul Club”

February 11, 2014 

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward Street in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward Street in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The GOODS from The Biltmore Cabaret

Vancouver, BC | Valentine’s Day is coming up, and nothing bleeds romance like soul music. With that, the Biltmore has put together a nice little thing with our friends from the neighbourhood, The Cascade Company. Dinner for two, followed by dancing for free! Take that special someone out to one of their fine restaurants and make sure to get a receipt, then roll on over to The Biltmore and slide on in, on us, and get close to the sweet sounds of The East Van Soul Club. Learn more after the jump… Read more

Chez Christophe Chocolaterie Patisserie 

February 3, 2014 

christophe

DETAILS

Logo16

4712 Hastings St, Burnaby, BC, V5C 2K7
Telephone: 604.428.4200 | Email: info [at] christophe-chocolat.com
Web: www.christophe-chocolat.com | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram
Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 8:00am to 6pm | Closed Sunday/Monday

Gallery

DSC_0860IMG_2462DSC_4296images-4DSC_6678DSC_4423DSC_6679DSC_4566DSC_4513DSC_4214DSC_4463DSC_4445DSC_4268DSC_4201

Key People

DSC_6679

Christophe Bonzon, Co-Owner & Executive Pastry Chef
Jess Bonzon, Co-Owner

About Chez Christophe

DSC_4296

The story of Chez Christophe is a story of love and passion – your Artisans love for sharing his creations and a little bit of his Swiss origins by introducing you to a small taste of Switzerland. Christophe Bonzon discovered chocolate at the age of ten when he was helping his mother make chocolate truffles as a gift for Christmas. Since then the passion for sweet food never left him. Christophe is a Swiss trained “Confectioner” or in more familiar terms Pastry Chef/Chocolatier. Alongside chocolate another of his passions is creating artistic sculptures with sugar. For the meticulous Christophe, his art lies in “the freedom of creativity and my passion for creating artistic sculptures with sugar and chocolate – the opportunities to transform are endless.”

Christophe’s resumé is studded with a decade full of intense apprenticeships and coursework in the fine art of pastry and chocolate, both in his native Switzerland and in France. Amongst many other institutions he has studied under some of Europe’s grand masters at Zurich’s Chocolate Academy, and at l’Ecole du Grand Chocolat Valrhona in France. Various professional postings followed, including as pastry chef at Confectionary Schneider in Switzerland, followed by Choux Cafe in Western Australia. Christophe worked as an Executive Pastry Chef at one of the finest French Pastry Shops in Perth.

More recently Christophe was the Executive Pastry Chef at the award-winning CinCin Restorante in Vancouver, Canada. Christophe is a firm believer that you are constantly learning throughout your life for the learning curve never ends.

DINER | Cozy, Japanese-Inspired “Basho Cafe” Opening This Week On East Hastings

January 29, 2014 

basho

Local food industry veterans Miju Kawai and Hiroshi Kawai are aiming to open a darling little Japanese cafe this week or the next with their daughter, Moeno. The 16 seater is called Basho, which means “place” in Japanese. It’s located at 2007 East Hastings St., just a block east of Victoria Drive.

Hiroshi and Miju are lifers. They owned a neighbourhood lunch spot in Yokohama before moving to Canada to open North Van’s Kokoro eatery in 1994. After selling it nearly a decade later, they opened Hiroshi’s Sushi Creations on Oak Street in 2005 (it’s now called Tokiwa).

Inspired by the neighbourhood coffee shops that they loved and hung out in on adventures in Tokyo and Berlin, the Kawai’s want Basho to be a den of coziness with small personal touches that give off genuine warmth. Almost everything in Basho is handmade by the family, from the furniture and stained glass by Hiroshi to the pottery, quilts and knits by Miju and the aprons and wood carvings by Moeno. All the plates, cups, and dishes were either sourced from local thrift stores or made by hand. The music is all vinyl.

In addition to Japanese sencha, genmaicha and bancha, Basho will be steeping 3 black teas, 1 rooibos, and 1 herbal tea, plus coffee from Hand Works Coffee Studio. For food, there will be lunch sets of salads, sandwiches, and rice bowls, not to mention house-baked sweets. Expect matcha flavours, Japanese style crème caramels, and mochi.

As it stands now, they’re  just one permit away from unlocking their doors. When they get the green light, the hours will be Tuesday through Friday from 7:30am to 4:30pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 9am to 4pm. In the meantime, you can follow them and stay up to date on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram.

BashoMiju Kawai, Moeno Kawai,  Hiroshi KawaiBasho Matcha shortcake with white chocolate fillingBasho CafeBasho CafeBasho CafeCoconut Matcha cookies @bashocafeBashoBashoBasho - lunch setBashoSesame Miso cookiesMatcha Latte Basho CafeBashoMoeno making matcha Basho CafeBashoBasho CafeBasho CafeBasho CafeBasho CafeSesame Miso cookies  at Basho Cafe

ALL ANTICIPATED RESTAURANTS

« Previous PageNext Page »