GREENLIGHT: Watch The Frack Out Of The Trailer For Rayher & Gillis’ ‘Fractured Land’

January 17, 2013 

by Claudia Chan | With the world’s demand for energy booming, Enbridge begging for a pipeline stretching from northern Alberta to BC, Kinder Morgan wanting to increase the number of tankers right here in Burrard Inlet, and Haliburton fracking on indigenous land to extract natural gas, British Columbians face a battery of increasingly clear and present dangers to their environmental and physical health. Filmmakers Damien Gillis and Fiona Rayher of Fractured Land (fracturedland.com) are trying to tell us this important story through the prism of Caleb Behn, a young First Nations lawyer from northeastern BC who is working to defend his peoples’ land from some of the most intense industrial activity in the world. Having followed Caleb for two years now, the filmmakers are currently raising funds through Indiegogo to complete their documentary ($28,000 raised so far, with a little over a day left in the campaign). Check out the trailer above.

——————————————————————————————————————-

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

Cool Thing We Want #369: A Strong $9 Bicycle Made From Recycled Cardboard

January 11, 2013 

by Claudia Chan | A $9 bicycle made out of recyclable cardboard sounds almost unfathomable, but not to Israeli designer Izhar Gafni, who spent three years developing the idea. Take a look at his creation, a bike called The Alfa. Weighing only 20lbs, it’s able to support riders up to 485lbs! It can also withstand water and humidity, and Gafni claims that it’s stronger than carbon fibre. Without a doubt, this is a positive revolution in bicycle culture and sustainable design. Hopefully it inspire similar innovations. A cardboard car, perhaps?

EVERY COOL THING WE WANT

GREENLIGHT: On Just How Easy It Is To Raise Chickens In The Heart Of Vancouver

January 3, 2013 

by Claudia Chan | While backyard chickens are relatively new in Vancouver, they’re just a feathered facet of normality in many countries. In my travels, I recall being woken up by the cock-a-doodling of roosters (against the blaring of prayers) in countries like Tunisia and Indonesia. Chickens are globally prevalent, often kept in the courtyards of families or let out to roam free. In most countries you will often find them by the beach, walking around restaurants, and even walking down the street. For many cultures, the fowl is a staple food. They’re easy and cheap to raise and maintain, and not only do they provide good meat and bones for stock, they also produce wholesome eggs.

In Vancouver, I find that chickens often go unnoticed because keepers are only allowed hens in their coops, and hens don’t cluck as loudly as roosters do (thankfully). It also seems that keeping chickens hasn’t quite become as popular as one would assume, given their myriad benefits. Curious, I decided to find out more about backyard chickens in Vancouver by paying a visit to some neighbours who just happen to be very happy owners of a couple of hens.

In the photo above you can see Russell Gendron (red toque), Dylan Jones (short hair, hoodie) and Tresler Jones (long hair), three Vancouverites who have been tending to chickens for just under a year now in Strathcona. They tell me it’s been well worth it. Each hen produces an egg a day, so they collect a decent supply for their house. Russell took on this homesteading project when he saw some friends do it after the city passed a by-law allowing it in 2010. He started doing some research of his own on coop building, city regulations, and animal care.

Each home is allowed a maximum of four hens (no chicks) for egg-laying and they must be housed in a coop with a proper roof, fencing, nesting box and ventilation (specs must adhere to strict design requirements). Building the coop was the most laborious part of it all, Russell says. Otherwise, they’re pretty easy to look after. After the hardest part was done, he filled out an online registry, bought some chickens off Craigslist for $10 each, and brought them back to their new home. Ever since, the household has saved on grocery store trips and eating fresh, and tasty eggs sourced straight from the backyard.

If you’re feeling ever so inspired to raise some chickens of your own or you’d like to learn more about the process, there’s a wealth of resources available online available. Have a gander at Backyard Chickens, Chickens in Vancouver, Daily Eggs, Village Vancouver, and City Farmer. Alternatively, go visit the nice folks at the Homesteader’s Emporium; they’ve got everything you need to start raising backyard chickens.

Bok bok.

——————————————————————————————————————-

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

GREENLIGHT: So Let’s Say It’s A Few Days Before Christmas And You Need Gift Ideas

December 21, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | If you’re still putting together a few last minute gifts here at the tail end of the holiday countdown, allow me to throw a few green-inspired ideas at you…

1. Get in on a CSA box (Community-supported Agriculture) with Sole Food. Give the gift of weekly fresh, seasonal vegetables from an inner-city farm that supports DTES residents/apprentice farmers.

Full Share – $500 ($25/week for 20 weeks)
Half Share – $300 ($15/week for 20 weeks)
Salad Share – $150 ($15/week for 10 weeks)
Winter Share – $450($20/week for 15 weeks)
Family share including delivery – $35/week

2. From the Soap Dispensary on Main St.: refillable premium bio-degradable soaps in a little wooden box with a plant-based sponge.  They’re a great, practical and eco-friendly gift that should encourage all of us to do a little bit more cleaning on the regular.

3. Ulat wool dryer balls make great stocking stuffers. Not only are they locally made and cost-effective, they’re energy-effective (they decrease drying time from 30-50%). A set of three goes for $30 at Benny’s on Union Street.

4. How much sweeter can you be than Mellifera Bees? Melissa Cartwright makes the best honey in town, produced from hives all over the city and the Lower Mainland. We’re talking about delicious, highly aromatic, hand-crafted honey infusions! There are jars with lemon, cardamom and vanilla infusions available for $15 at Harvest Community Foods.

5. Get nerdy! For those who enjoy foraging and are curious about wild things that grow here on the Coast, this is the book for you. You can find Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast at the Homesteader’s Emporium for $24.75. It’ a great identification book to bring along for all your walks in the woods.

——————————————————————————————————————-

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

HEADS UP: The Rio Theatre Hosting Inter-Generational Dialogue On Power & Energy

December 10, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | There’s some good conversation going down this Tuesday, December 11th at the Rio Theatre. Gen Why Media is hosting the third night in a series called Bring Your Boomers. It’s an inter-generational dialogue that aims to promote thoughtfulness and action around things that matter to young people, like entering the workforce, housing affordability, civic engagement, and climate change.

Tomorrow’s event, entitled Power and Energy: Connecting the Dots, seeks to explore BC’s emerging carbon corridor and the implications of the proposed expansion of tankers in the Burrard Inlet, the construction of the Enbridge pipelines, and the steps needed to take in order to maintain a healthier environment in a greener economy. There’ll be music by local band Brasstronauts, dance performance, storytelling, and dialogue. I hope to see you there!

December 11th, 2012 | 7pm (doors at 6:30) at the Rio Theatre – 1660 East Broadway | TICKETS

GREENLIGHT: Inside The Tiny “Athena Atelier” Pop-Up In Gastown’s Parking Spot

December 6, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | Local designer Athena Theny has set up shop in a 120 square foot space on the southeast corner of Cordova and Carrall. The space is the revolving pop-up host cGREalled Parking Spot. It’s a small showcase room offered free to local creative entrepreneurs who want to explore and develop their art and ideas. Recently, several UBC Masters of Architecture students transformed it into Athena Atelier, where Theny creates and displays her most exquisite collection of traditionally tanned leather goods and nautically inspired jewellery.

I paid a visit to temporary store to take a look at all her wares. The small space has a beautiful aesthetic; adorned with a stretched hide against the wooden walls, tanned leathers, furs, antlers and even a rope swing that hangs from the ceiling (I couldn’t resist having a few swings myself).

Deeply inspired by traditional aboriginal practices, Athena makes ethically sourced, environmentally sustainable and socially responsible leather necklaces, bags, vests, moccasins, mitts, clutches and pouches. She also has a line of jewelry consisting of rings and necklaces cast in the shape of nautical knots, alluding to family stories told to her by her grandfather who lived in the wild and her great grandfather who was a fisherman.

Theny explains that most of the world’s leather products are tanned with chemicals such as chromium, which damages ecologies and vulnerable populations in third-world countries such as India and China (the chromium is washed off from the hides and seeps into their drinking water). The trade’s sourcing of animal hides is often questionable as well.

Having learned from various mentors in her First Nations studies at Simon Fraser University, a local urban aboriginal group as well as with the Algonquin peoples in Québec, Theny uses traditional leather tanning practices. She spends at least 20 hours processing hide. This entails removing the flesh and hair on either side of the hide and tanning it with the brains of the animal. You can also tan it with something as simple as Sunlight soap. She explains, “Tanning the hides in this way produces a leather that’s more water-resistant, that has a softer texture and that’s longer lasting, and therefore maintaining the integrity of animal skin.” Theny sources her materials from hunters that she’s cultivated relationships with over the years. She highlights the importance of being aware of how the animal was honoured, how all the parts its body were used and how she can trace the hide back to who killed and ate the animal.

To learn more about Theny and her designs, you can visit the atelier at 8 E. Cordova. The shop is open by appointment during the weekdays and on Saturdays 12 – 7. And when you stop in, make sure you give the swing a try!

——————————————————————————————————————-

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

GREENLIGHT: “The Soap Dispensary” Set To Celebrate Their 1st Anniversary On Main

November 28, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | It’s good – though sad – to remember that plastic doesn’t really disappear when you throw it out. There’s a lot of it, and seeing that it doesn’t biodegrade, every piece of it ever made still exists. I was talking about this last week with Linh Truong of The Soap Dispensary when she brought up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. If you haven’t heard of it, it’s really quite appalling — we’re talking about a huge soup of trash, of which 90% is plastic, accumulated into a stationary mass through the rhythmic action of oceanic currents in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, devastating seabird populations and generally being a floating indictment of our wastefulness (it’s twice the size of Texas). To give you an idea of what that looks like, watch this video by artist Chris Jordan.

Anyway, it was with this in mind that Linh began to help people reduce their use of plastic in their households. Her shop at 3623 Main St. offers refills of premium eco-friendly soaps, house cleaners and personal care products to lessen the number of single-use bottles from ending up in our landfills, watersheds and recycling systems. “While recycling is good, it’s really not the first stage in terms of sustainable practices,” she says. “Bottles are sturdy. They’re made to last a long time and they never biodegrade. So why not reuse them? If you can reuse something, I strongly feel that you should.”

When she was living in Victoria between 2004 and 2009, Linh was a regular at the Soap Exchange. When they moved over here, they were surprised that no such thing existed. Last year, they decided to introduce the concept, which means they no longer have to bring all their bottles with them back to the Island for refills when visiting friends.

Linh says the neighbourhood has been really supportive so far and that customers are enthusiastic about bottle reusage, buying refillable products, sharing knowledge on ecological ways of keeping a household, and participating in DIY workshops (held at the store). Their first anniversary is on December 8th and to celebrate they’re throwing a Customer Appreciation Party. Everyone will receive 15% off of all refillable products when they bring your their owns bottles, and Linh will be revealing the number of plastic bottles that the store has diverted from landfills since it opened. So be sure to pop in and congratulate her on this tremendous effort. If you’re so inspired to learn about reducing your plastic footprint, the Soap Dispensary is as great a place as any to start. Take a look…

The Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap DispensaryThe Soap Dispensary

——————————————————————————————————————-

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

GREENLIGHT: Talking Shop With “Eco Fashion Week” Founder Myriam Laroche

November 15, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | I recently had the chance to go shopping with the very stylish Myriam Laroche, president and founder of Eco Fashion Week. We went around to some of her favourite stores in town (Deluxe Junk and Community Thrift & Vintage pictured above), during which time she shared her enthusiasm for Vancouver’s new wave of sustainability in fashion. She spoke at length of her 18 years working in the corporate apparel and fashion trade at home in her native Montreal, back when she was a buyer for chain companies like Historia and Jacob, and how the experience forever changed her attitude towards fashion. She found that there was cumulatively more and more unnecessary waste in the business, so after she moved out west and immersed herself in the environmental movement here, she took her experience and passion for fashion and integrated it with the principles of sustainable practices. Soon afterwards, Eco Fashion Week was born. Laroche has since dedicated a lot of her time to the entirely volunteer-run celebration of local, sustainable fashion in the hope that it might serve to educate the public and industry members about ethical production and consumption. Of course people are always going to keep buy things, she says, but it’s all about how you do it.

Here’s some of her advice on how to shop ethically,

1. Be honest with yourself. Ask yourself, “Do I really need it?” Shopping can be an addictive behaviour and in order to change that, you can change the way you think about it.

2. Wherever you buy, get educated about the origins of the product and its materials. Great websites to check out include Eco Fashion World and Eco Salon.

3. Learn about the store or the company you are buying from and the vendor’s philosophy.

4. Buy vintage or consigned clothing from places like Value Village, Deluxe Junkie, Community Thrift or Front & Company.

5. Support a local designer. Some of Myriam’s favourites include Nicole Bridger, Melissa Ferreirra, Kim Cathers, Lindsay Walsh, Gypsy Market at One of a Kind, and Wings + Horns at Roden Gray.

Consider these points on your next shopping adventure and remember that the changes you make don’t have to be drastic. Start slowly and know that you’re not just shopping responsibly for yourself but also for your local and larger communities, and for the greater well-being of the planet.

——————————————————————————————————————-

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

GREENLIGHT: Out Foraging For Wild Foods With Tyler Gray Of “Mikuni Wild Harvest”

November 6, 2012 

by Claudia Chan with photos by Michelle Sproule | In our beautiful woods the wild things grow. What many of us urbanites easily forget, however, is that that same abundance thrives with edible plants and fungi. We depended on this wild plant life for our survival during most of the course of human existence, living symbiotically with nature by harvesting only what we needed and learning about the health benefits of different plants by spending much of our waking hours cleaning, processing, cooking, and eating them.

That all changed with the industrialization of our food systems. We’ve become so far removed from nature that the idea of going out to the forest for own own dinner sounds not only ridiculous, but also impossible. We’ve become accustomed to pushing grocery carts through store aisles and eating produce from boxes packed a hemisphere away.

The revival of the locavore movement has inspired some enthusiasts to return to the old practices; to recapture some of the traditional wisdom about food and the medicinal values of plants and fungi. Vancouverite Tyler Gray is one of their number.

Born and bred on the Sunshine Coast, Gray is one of the rarest of our species: a hunter and gatherer of the 21st century, one who has turned a passion for the wild into a career. He learned the tricks of his outdoor trade having spent ample time foraging for wild foods in and around Sechelt. He gives credit to his mom and grandparents, who taught him the ways of the woods and about all the treasures that grow within. “My grandparents were the original locavores,” he says, adding that “they could never tell you what that word means. They just lived that way because it’s how they were raised. They grew up in a really small town and they ended up farming, foraging and hunting all of their food. They also canned and pickled. So those trades got passed down to my mom and I was raised in that culture.”

Since 2004, having inherited that knowledge and experience, Gray has led a successful specialty wild foods distribution company called Mikuni Wild Harvest. Mikuni means “beautiful forest” in Japanese. It’s a fitting brand, as the products the company carries include some of the most exquisite and unique things that come from the woods. Think fiddleheads, caviar licorice root, chanterelles, Matsutake mushrooms, wild watercress, sea asparagus, and so on. The list of available edibles from Mikuni is huge.

On a recent (and very wet) forest walkabout with Gray, I learned that scavenging for such things required a good pair of hunting eyes, some experience, and a whole lot of confidence. You don’t want to eat just any kind of plant out there and you certainly don’t want to take a chance with mushrooms. Gray has years of practice under his belt, so it was clear on our walk that he knew where to look and what to look for (admittedly, I didn’t have a clue). But it’s not just him doing the hunting and gathering. He procures some of the finest products from a few of the most experienced foragers in North America. Those suppliers include a 70-year-old Cherokee Native American named “Running Squirrel” and a ramp forager from West Virginia named “Crazy Harry”. Read more

HEADS UP: The Vancouver Public Library Is In The Midst Of A Massive Used Book Sale!

October 26, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | Looking for some good books to curl up with in this cold and rainy Fall weather? The Vancouver Public Library is having a massive book sale and its already started. Books were going for 75 cents to $2.50 today and the awesomeness continues over the weekend (Saturday 10am-6pm and Sunday 12pm – 5pm). They have thousands of bargains and treasures worth rummaging through, but don’t forget to bring your pockets full of change because it’s cash only!

Alice MacKay Room | Lower Level | Central Library | 350 West Georgia Street

———————————————————————————————–

Seen In Vancouver #406: Growing Chefs’ “From Farms To Forks” Good Times At PICA

October 25, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | It’s not often that one gets to witness a chef in action when dining in a restaurant. This past Sunday night however, Growing Chefs! invited their guests for an exclusive look behind the scenes at their third annual Farms2Forks Harvest Kitchen Fundraiser at the Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts. The evening featured an interactive feast where guests mingled with some of Vancouver’s most prominent chefs and mixologists, as well as the region’s best growers and producers.

As we wandered about from one classroom kitchen to another on this unique culinary experience, we tasted some of the finest canapés, cocktails and wines from the likes of restaurants such as The Acorn, Provence, Fat Dragon, Kale and Nori Culinary Arts, Les Faux Bourgeous, Tableau, and more.

The proceeds from the evening go to Growing Chefs! in support of their schoolyard garden program that focuses on educating elementary school children on urban agriculture and food sustainability. Growing Chefs! brings chefs and local producers into the classroom to inspire young students in becoming more engaged with cooking and growing wholesome, healthy food. As you can see, the night was a big win, in the present and for the future.

Growing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie DivesGrowing Chefs! Farms To Forks | photo: Jackie Dives

EVERYTHING SEEN IN VANCOUVER

——————————————————————————————————

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

GREENLIGHT: Local Company “Patch” Brings Urban Gardening Inside The Home

October 18, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | The city feels like it’s going through a major growth spurt right now, a green one that is. More than ever before, community gardens, urban farms, and front yard plots are popping up at the turn of every corner. And it’s no wonder, really. Food-growing space in the city is increasingly hard to come by and is therefore very much sought after. Urban farmers and avid gardeners have proven to be resourceful and innovative with their uses of space – from rooftops, public parks, and abandoned expanses to fences off, unused parking lots. Of all these possibilities though, one of the best places to start growing food is in the comfort of your own home. And all you need is a sleek little white planter box.

Patch Planters is an urban agriculture initiative that allows you to grow edible greens and culinary herbs both outdoors and indoors. I like to think of it as a miniature DIY (do-it-yourself) farming concept. It’s a simple, transportable, wholly versatile container box that produces greens just about anywhere – on your windowsill, tabletop, porch, or in your kitchen, classroom, even your office.

Patch PlantersPatch PlantersPatch PlantersPatch PlantersPatch PlantersPatch PlantersPatch Planters

Kent Houston, the director of the Vancouver-born company, came up with the idea when his landscape contracting company volunteered with the building of the first SoleFood Farm site at Hastings and Hawks a few years ago. From his experience there, he recognized an opportunity to provide a solution for urban agriculture efforts – a portable container system that would last longer and offer more functional qualities. Instead of using traditional planters that require a lot of wood, eventually biodegrade and go to the landfill, he opted to design a compact planter box that’s fully recyclable made with Tyvex and 60% post-consumerist materials.

Patches come with a built-in sub-irrigation system. In other words, it self-waters. A small amount of soil sits in a screened in-section of a reservoir at the bottom of the container. The soil wicks the water up into the rest of the soil through capillary action; similar to the way a sponge soaks up water. The beauty of the Patch planter is that you can’t underwater or overwater and it gives you a greater yield because it always has the perfect amount of H2O. Even the most careless among us will never have to worry about killing our plants.

Patch is farming made easy. It challenges the idea that growing food is time-consuming, difficult, back-breaking, gruelling work. In fact, it makes growing vegetables simple, fun and accessible. Truly anybody can grow food, including yourself.

Don’t let the turn of the cold season discourage you. It’s not too late to start growing greens like arugula, romaine lettuce, mint and parsley for the winter. Just make sure your Patch gets enough light at a south-facing window (alternatively, some inexpensive fluorescent lamps would also do the trick).

Patch is really keen on supporting local non-profit initiatives. Currently, they’re working in collaboration with Growing Chefs!, a project that I’m a big fan of (I volunteered with them this past Spring), and with the purchase of a planter online, they donate another to a classroom to teach kids about growing food.

You can also get your Patch at Walrus on Cambie and at Strathcona’s Harvest Community Foods.

——————————————————————————————————

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

HEADS UP: Get Set To Stuff Your Brains & Faces At The 4th Annual Sustenance Fest

October 9, 2012 

by Claudia Chan | The 4th annual Sustenance Festival is happening at the Roundhouse from October 11th to October 21st. The fest features an exciting lineup of events and workshops that summon community groups, artists and people to partake in Vancouver’s tasty foodscape. There’ll be art exhibits, performances, and a variety of interesting workshops on foraging, fondue-making, cheese-crafting, dessert-decorating and more. It finishes with a street food fest on Sunday the 21st so be sure to get your grub on!

——————————————————————————————————

Claudia Chan is an advocate of all things green. Born and raised in Vancouver, she is inspired by the work of local urban farmers, eco artists and policy makers who make this city the most lush and livable to work and play in. Her mission with Scout and her “Greenlight” column is to impart her enthusiasm for bike lanes, community gardens, farmers’ markets and more to her fellow Vancouverites.

Next Page »