TEA & TWO SLICES | On Making A Mess Of “Happy Hour” And Spilling Irony Everywhere

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by Sean OrrOil spill clean-up ship hit sandbar en route to government news conference in Vancouver. What the article doesn’t mention is that the ship accidentally spilled 36 megatons of unrefined irony.

Postmedia Gets Away With Running Unmarked Oil Advertorials. I’d hardly say they got away with it. It made it onto Tea & Two Slices after all! “Readers expect news organizations to maintain their first loyalty to citizens…” Well, there’s your first mistake right there.

A relationship cut short in B.C. with one fell swoop by Enbridge. The author makes it seem like the Haisla and Enbridge were walking down the aisle in holy matrimony until some jerk stood up and yelled “Yo, I fucked the bride! Hahaha!”

Why Are BC’s Natural Resource Officers Buying Bulletproof Vests? Especially when what they really need are leaflet-proof vests.

BC’s formal response to the mayors’ transit plan. Reads like: “Aw, thank guys for cute report but forgot include MOAR LANES…”

The Problem Isn’t Vancouver’s Astronomical Housing Costs— It’s the People Who Buy Them. I only glanced through this Op-Ed because I first “Command-F” searched it for mentions of CMHC, mortgage, wages, and welfare and found no matches. Also, the author is dreaming if be thinks Amazon will pay all its Vancouver employees 100k.

A premium on logic: Unhappy hour comes to B.C. pubs that must now raise prices. Ah yes, the old bureaucratic cash grab under the guise of public safety. As if hipsters and winos aren’t just going to drink in the alley behind the bar instead…

Quote of the week from Nicholas Ellan:

Tonight the City of Vancouver held its first annual Awards of Excellence. Two “Freedom of the City” awards for special achievement were presented: one to Judy Graves for her tireless and selfless work as a housing advocate for Vancouver’s homeless; and one to Jim Pattison, for being rich as fuck.

I love that this is a thing: Grouse Grind: Mountaintop resort profits from a trail paid for by Metro Vancouver taxpayers.

SCOUT LIST | Ten Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now And Next Week

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

BEER | Craft is a recently released beer documentary from filmmaker Craig Noble that will end its 12-city US/Canadian tour at the Rio Theatre this Tuesday night. From fact-gathering and technique-building during an apprenticeship at a farm brewery to testing his knowledge at beer school and countless visits to a wide cross-section of people making craft beer across Canada and the United States, Noble’s film aims to “look at how breweries are taking on the task of maintaining the quality, creativity and integrity expected by thirsty beer connoisseurs.” Tickets to the screening are only $8 but for a nominal $15 beans you can get in on the pre-show 6pm “VIP” tasting (sample pours from Four Winds Brewing, Driftwood Brewery, Crannog Ales and Brassneck Brewery), hang out with other craft beer enthusiasts, AND watch the documentary.
Tues, June 24 | Tasting 6pm, Show 8pm | Rio Theatre (1660 E Broadway) | $8/$15 | DETAILS

LATE NIGHT ART |
This week, Late Night Art explores the theme of art in medicine at the UBC Medical Student & Alumni Centre. A little collaborative art together with some ambient music and plenty of good food makes for a great big group date that’s made better by intelligent conversation and warm fuzzy feelings of connectedness. Food will be facilitated by Sophia Ahamed (graphic designer, medical illustrator and lover of science); menu highlights include olives, roasted Medjool dates, pickled turnip and beet, pork rilette or wild mushroom pate on sourdough baguette, and coconut cream custard with dark chocolate-covered popcorn. Tickets are $35 including the workshop, dinner, tax, and tip. Not bad for a Wednesday night!
Wed, June 25 | 7:30pm | Medical Student & Alumni Centre (2750 Heather St.) | $35 | DETAILS

LAUGH | Get yourself to Main Street’s Hot Wet Art City Gallery this Friday night for Comics on Comics. Be entertained by a line-up of Vancouver comedians using “old, awful and forgotten comic books” as fodder. Hosted by Brent Constantine, the panel features Andrew MacLachlan, Brad Dorion, Stuart Jones, Alex Sparling, Shane McLean, and Warren Bates.
Fri, June 27 | 9-11pm (doors 8:30) | Hot Art Wet City (2206 Main @ 6th) | $10 | DETAILS

GUILTY PLEASURES | “Get ready to spill your secrets, share your shame and indulge your wild side,” because Rain City Chronicles happens this Friday night and it’s going to be a good one! The theme for this round of storytelling is Guilty Pleasures. RCC believes that everyone has a great personal story to tell and they make it their business to create opportunities for our communities to share them. Not only can attendees expect an eclectic line-up of speakers taking the stage to let you in on their guilty pleasures, there will also be food, drink and plenty of music. Jackie Ellis of Beaucoup Bakery will be sharing a story (and treats), and bartender Nick Devine has some confessions to make together with David Moscrop, Adrienne Matei, Ollie Rankin, Tania Quiroz, Jeff Lawrence, Emily Elias, Cole Nowicki and Rommy Ghaly. For your listening enjoyment, The Guilty Pleasures Band will be playing (they’ve pulled together a set list of a bunch of songs that you’re afraid to admit you know every lyric of) and there will be much laughing. So it’s pretty much a perfect way to end the week and start the weekend. Get sorted with tickets here.
Fri, June 27 | Doors 6:30pm | Rio Theatre (1660 E Broadway) | $15 | DETAILS

FAMILY | Saturday is free for families at the Contemporary Art Gallery. Pack everyone up and head down down to the CAG for short exhibition tours and free art-making activities. The theme for this Saturday is Word Play. From the Contemporary Art Gallery: “This workshop will be based on the mural that has transformed the facade of our building; it is created by Mexican artist Stefan Brüggemann and is titled: Headlines and Last Lines in the Movies. The artist has paired together recent news headlines with the last lines from well-known and classic Hollywood movies; we will be tracing individual words and phrases from the mural to create our own text-based works.”
Sat, June 28 | 12–3pm | Contemporary Art Gallery (555 Nelson St) | Free | DETAILS

EAST SIDE PRIDE | Celebrate gay pride East Van-style this weekend. Head to Grandview Park Saturday to wander the Pride Market (tables and booths exhibiting the wares of local artisans), enjoy an eclectic mix of live music and performances, and dig on the good vibes galore. This free event is all-ages and appropriate for the whole family. Neither free nor possible for the whole family (but still a good time) is the official Eastside Pride afterparty at The Fox. This portion of the day will involve DJ’s, drinks, a Freddie Mercury drag show, and more.
Sat, June 28 | 11am-6pm | Grandview Park (1657 Charles St) | Free | DETAILS
Sat, June 28 | 9pm |The Fox Cabaret (2321 Main St) | $12 DETAILS

GROW WHAT YOU JUICE | The Victory Gardens crew is partnering with their pals at The Juice Truck to offer a workshop on how to grow fresh veggies that you can make into nutritious and tasty juice. This 2 hour class will take place in the community room at the The Juice Truck’s new brick and mortar space in Mount Pleasant. Whether you’re a novice or experienced, you’ll leave this class able to plan a winter or summer garden that will produce delicious organic, juice-ready plants. Extra bonus: the price of the workshop (only $24) includes a freshly pressed Juice Truck juice to keep you fuelled. Extra super bonus: stick around afterwards, as Victory Gardens will be holding a Summer Stock Greenhouse Sale (until 3pm) where you can pick up some great stuff to get started.
Sat, June 28 | 11am-12pm | The Juice Truck (28 West 5th Ave) | $24 | DETAILS

EXPLORE | The Steveston Salmon Festival goes down this coming Tuesday. This is the 69th year that Salmon Festival will hit the Steveston docks and it’s a fantastic excuse to explore the quaint fishing village. There’ll be a pancake breakfast, a parade, a Japanese Cultural Show, a craft fair, live music, and the biggest, best, most wonderful salmon barbecue you have ever seen ($15 per plate). It’s estimated that somewhere in the neighbourhood of 70,000 people will show up. So take transportation and parking into consideration (this is a great day bike trip).
Tue, July 1 | All Day | Steveston | DETAILS

CANOEING | There’s something especially fortifying about ending an extended long weekend with a bit of nature. Get grounded, grab a paddle, a canoe, and a life jacket before hitting Burnaby Lake Regional Park for a spin around the water with a knowledgeable park guide on Canada Day. Keep an eye out for dragonflies, all manner of birds, and even the occasional beaver (the last time we were here we saw our first ever Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker). NB: this activity is recommended for those over the age of 13.
Tue, July 1 | Burnaby Lake Regional Park (6450 Deer Lake Ave.) | $21.25/person | DETAILS

EAT LOCAL | Grab locally grown produce from good people at your neighbourhood farmer’s market to sustain you through the long weekend. This is the best time to hot the markets, so much fresh fruit rolling in from the Okanagan. Good bread, jams to spread on the bread, locally grown veggies, great cheese. Man-o-man it’s going to be a great farmers market season. Get inspired.
Main Street Thornton Park | Wednesday | 3pm–7pm | Main Street Station at Terminal
Oak Street | Wednesdays | 3-7pm | Oak and 49th
Yaletown | Thursdays | 2-6pm | Mainland between Davie & Helmcken
Trout Lake | Saturdays | 9am-2pm | North Parking Lot, John Hendry Park
West End | Saturdays | 9am-2pm | 1100 Block of Comox (across from Nelson Park)
Kits | Sundays | 10am-2pm | 2690 Larch @ 10th
Lonsdale Quay | Saturdays | 10am-3pm | East Plaza 123 Carrie Cates Court, North Van |
Ambleside | Sundays | 10am-3pm | 1500 Bellevue (between 15th & 16th), West Van
Dundarave (West Van) Saturday | 9am – 2pm | Between 24 & 25 on Marine
Oak Street Market | Wednesday | 3-7pm | Oak @ 49th (Unitarian Church)
UBC Farm Market | Saturday | 9-1 | UBC Farm 

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy (but faithful) camera.

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FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE BRIEF #429 | How To Make Good Hunting Blowpipes In Borneo

(via) “Only a few elders of Borneo’s Penan tribe still know how to make their unique hunting tool, the blowpipe. Balan is the last person in his village who practices the dying craft.”

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SCOUT LIST | Ten Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now And Next Week

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

CITY DRINKS | The Vancouver Heritage Foundation has arranged for an amazing 1930′s Newspaper Glory Days-themed evening of music and cocktails inside the storied Sun Tower this Thursday night. Listen to jazz (Vancouver jazz musicians James Danderfer and David Blake will be playing), enjoy 30′s inspired cocktails (mixed by Bambudda bar manager Buck Friend), and sample loads of canapés. Historian Daniel Francis will be in attendance with his wealth of knowledge and guests will be invited to take part in small guided tours of the newly renovated upper floor of the tower (recently restored but retaining original fixtures, old school radiators, marble staircases, single paned glass windows and stunning tile work). There will also be some lively conversation about history, architecture, design and the preservation of Vancouver heritage buildings. From Vancouver Heritage Foundation: “Built in 1912 the Sun Tower was one of the earliest steel frame skyscrapers in Vancouver, and was originally the home of the Vancouver World newspaper. It was commissioned by L.D. Taylor, the paper’s owner, and longest serving Mayor in Vancouver’s history. Bought by the Vancouver Sun in 1935, it was renamed the Sun Tower and became known for the distinctive rays of its neon sign. The beaux-arts building has a number of intriguing heritage features including a series of female sculptures surrounding the roof, green dome, and bold symmetry throughout.” The Sun Tower? Now that’s a venue! Extra bonus: there’ll be a raffle and one of the prizes will be a tour of the dome (we checked it out today and it was amazing!). Proceeds support Vancouver Heritage Foundation’s education programming and your ticket includes a $35 charitable tax receipt, so there!
Thu, June 19 | 6pm – 9pm | Sun Tower (128 West Pender) | $75 | DETAILS

NEW PIZZA | The highly anticipated “Bufala” pizzeria recently opened in Kerrisdale. It comes to us via Josh Pape and James Iranzad, the award-winning restaurateurs behind West Hastings’ excellent Wildebeest eatery. We checked it out on opening night and did our best to eat the place whole. What to order? Everything we tried was fantastic, but make sure you don’t leave without trying the smoked ham, pea, taleggio and truffle oil pizza. Holy good god was it ever good!
5395 West Blvd (Arbutus) at West 38th | Lunch & Dinner Everyday | DETAILS

STUDIO TIME | Carylann Loeppky paints portraits — lots of them. Her style sits at the intersection somewhere between cute and creepy and the walls of her studio are full and ready to be experienced. This Thursday, Carylann is opening her studio for Petit Palais, a show of recent works. There’s something great about visiting an artist in their natural habitat. The studio visit brings you the artist, their work, and their process all in one. Dig in!
Thur, June 19 | 6-10pm | Studio 338 1000 Parker Street | DETAILS

GO SKATEBOARDING DAY | There are so many ways to mark Go Skateboarding Day. Take a solo ride, 50-50 your favourite curb, stop by Antisocial to get outfitted with a new complete, or hit one of the many skateparks around the city. Vans Canada is hosting a waffle breakfast and skate at The Plaza (below the Georgia Viaduct at Union and Quebec) as well as skate jam and BBQ at Hastings Bowl (175 Renfrew) between 5 and 8pm. Even if you don’t skate, Saturday is a fine time to take a seat on the sidelines and appreciate the artform from a spectator’s perspective.
Sat, June 21 | All Day / Everywhere | Free | DETAILS

EXPLORE | This is a good weekend to take small people to the Vancouver Art Gallery. It’s Family FUSE Weekend! The theme is Here, There, and Everywhere! From the VAG “Our sense of home, community and the world around us is affected by many influences. Join artists, musicians, dancers, performers and educators as they take you Here, There and Everywhere through a range of interactive activities, performances and hands-on workshops!” As always, there’ll be excellent live music and some extra fun activities to encourage creativity (count on Malaspina Printmakers, The Vancouver Lego Club and The Now Society to help out in that department). What’s more, kids under 12 get in for free (score!) with a paying adult. This is also a good time to check out Douglas Coupland: everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything.
Sat–Sun, June 21-22 | 10am–5pm | Vancouver Art Gallery | 22.50 for grown-ups | DETAILS

DIG IT | The Vancouver International Jazz Festival is on. A fair number of the concerts are free and with so many gigs going on (hundreds of performances are scheduled) a game plan is in order. Narrow things down by using the ‘Performance Finder’ function on the Jazz Festival website for a list of what’s on (everything from Alternative and Indie to Big Band, Blues and Hip Hop). Scout picks include Norwegian songstress Susanna at Ironworks (June 21) and Bestie and The Belle Game at David Lam Park (June 29).
June 21 – July 1 | Various times and venues | Various Prices | DETAILS

BOOK ARTS | Head down to the Vancouver Public Library this Saturday to check out the Book Arts Fair. If you’re curious about the book as an object of art then this is the perfect venue to see some interesting stuff. Bookbinders and artists will be on site to show you altered books, bookbinding techniques and styles, the process of letterpress printing, and a variety of paper arts. This isn’t a stuffy museum-grade exhibit; you can touch and buy and ask questions. This event is put on by the B.C. Lower Mainland chapter of the Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild, so there’ll be some serious book smarts in the room.
Sat, June 21 | 10am-1pm | VPL Central Library, 350 W. Georgia St. | DETAILS

GO GREEK | Walk, take the bus or ride a bike to Greek Days this weekend. I mention modes of transportation because you won’t be the only one there and you’ll want to focus on having fun, not parking. Spend the day roaming a car free Broadway taking in live entertainment and enjoying good food. Expect Greek goddesses, warriors and heroes, Greek coffee and Mountain Tea, olives and lots of baklava. There’ll also be an Hellenic Experience Tent, cooking demonstrations, kids activities and, more. This event is free (until you start ordering souvlaki, Greek salad, gyros, roast lamb, filo pastries, et cetera).
Sun, June 22 | 11am to 9pm | Broadway, from McDonald to Blenheim | Free | DETAILS

CHOW | Food Cart Fest is set to make its tasty return this Sunday. A fleet of some 20 food trucks will be parked around communal tables at a site located between Olympic Village and the Cambie Street Bridge. Expect Soho Road, Mom’s Grilled Cheese, Mogu, Roaming Dragon, Yolks, and Tacofino – maybe even The Juice Truck. And the fun doesn’t stop there. There’ll also be live music, a community market, and all manner of ancillary vendors making it the raddest bit of undeveloped real estate in the city for one day of each week of summer.
June 22 – Sept 22 | 12-5pm | 215 West 1st | $2 (free with donation to food bank) | DETAILS

EAT LOCAL | Grab locally grown produce from good people at your neighbourhood farmer’s market while you still can. You won’t want to look back and wish that you had made it to more markets!
Main Street Thornton Park | Wednesday | 3pm–7pm | Main Street Station at Terminal | DETAILS
Oak Street | Wednesdays | 3-7pm | Oak and 49th | DETAILS
Yaletown | Thursdays | 2-6pm | Mainland between Davie & Helmcken | DETAILS
Trout Lake | Saturdays | 9am-2pm | North Parking Lot, John Hendry Park | DETAILS
West End | Saturdays | 9am-2pm | 1100 Block of Comox (across from Nelson Park) | DETAILS
Kits | Sundays | 10am-2pm | 2690 Larch @ 10th | DETAILS
Main Street | June 4 | 3pm-7pm | 1100 Block Main (Thornton Park) | DETAILS
Lonsdale Quay | Saturdays | 10am-3pm | East Plaza 123 Carrie Cates Court, North Van | DETAILS
Ambleside | Sundays | 10am-3pm | 1500 Bellevue (between 15th & 16th), West Van | DETAILS

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy (but faithful) camera.

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TEA & TWO SLICES | On Street Vending & No Money For Teachers (Because Oysters)

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by Sean Orr | Deceit on the half-shell: B.C. taxpayers on the hook for iTunes downloads, oysters and Hooters. Who uses iTunes anyway? Typical elitist. Why cant she just download tracks illegally like everyone else?

All that money for shellfish, and nothing for teachers? What B.C. Public School Classrooms Look Like Without Stuff Bought By Teachers.

Remember that this teacher’s strike is really Christy’s strike: Premier Christy Clark involved in BCTF strike strategy. Meanwhile, Hodor Supports B.C. Teachers.

And with that I will reward you with The 14 Best Hodor Quotes From “Game Of Thrones”.

Meanwhile, Public funding of private schools is a smart policy. I literally can’t even right now.

United We Can bottle depot moves, street vending increases. “The recent relocation of the United We Can bottle depot was expected to reduce congestion and street vending on the block where the depot was located (…) instead, the depot’s move has been followed by an increase in street vending and other illegal activity…” Oh, weird. So…if people can’t supplement their criminally low income from Welfare by legitimate means they’ll do so by illegal means? OK, has anyone involved in this process ever taken, like, one sociology class? Did they not see that coming? I mean, when will you learn?

NPA caucus is expelling school trustees Ken Denike, Sophia Woo. Woo! Shame on them for saying a proposed board policy designed to address the bullying of children based on their sexual orientation and/or gender identity would hurt real estate prices.

But then again, shame on The Globe and Mail for saying it would help real estate prices: How rainbow flags on Vancouver schools would boost real estate.

If you think co-opting the oppression of any marginalized group to fuel economic self-interest you might need a primer: Gender Diversity 101.

Speaking of marginalized: Aboriginals “(cannot) claim to have ancestors who were the ‘first’ people,” says letter to the editor that ran twice. Yeah, I mean, clearly, Australopithecus were the first people…

Related: A Tribe Called Red Accused Of Racism Over ‘Caucasians’ T-Shirt. Oh, I see their talking about…duhm duhm duuuuh, reverse racism!

Set up to fail: Police watchdog team turning on their master — is the IIO already doomed?. Who investigates the people who investigate the investigators? “Rosenthal explained that as a young lawyer he quickly gravitated toward white-collar crime and ‘holding the most powerful to account.’” The picture they ran with the story is the wrong one. It should be this one.

World Cup of Losers: Fight breaks out during a World Cup game. That headline should read: Granville Street breaks out during a World Cup game. Hmm, maybe they should have watched the game at a weed dispensary instead.

Honour Bound: Forest and the Femme Society takes Downtown Eastside women to the great outdoors.

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE BRIEF #428 | In The Congo, Making Soccer Balls From Trash

(via The New York Times): “As soon as I saw a photograph of an African soccer ball, stitched together from old rags in the geometric patterns so familiar to us, I wanted to tell its story. And so last July my filmmaking crew traveled to a village outside of Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo, where we shot this Op-Doc. Although the country did not qualify for the World Cup, people there – as in most of Africa – are mad about soccer. They play it everywhere. And because soccer balls like the ones common on American fields are a rarity in much of Africa, the sport is often played with homemade balls, like the one in this video.” – director Jerome Thélia.

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TEA & TWO SLICES | On Homeless Spikes & ‘Real Housewives’ As Civic Embarrassments

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by Sean Orr | The power of positive negative thinking: Why are so many Vancouver-area yoga studios closing their doors? Or, have we reached peak yoga? Is this a truer economic barometer than the housing market? Should we all get into child’s pose now? Omm….

Coming to a neighbourhood near you: Anti-homeless ‘spikes’ cause controversy in Montreal. Perhaps all our out-of-work yogis can start teaching the homeless the ancient yogic art of lying on a bed of nails.

Listen to this: Reality Check – The Homeless Sanctuary That Is Vancouver — in which Bruce Allen of CKNW embarrasses himself with feverish malice for the city’s less fortunate. Vancouver has a drug problem, Bruce, but blaming addicts and the homeless (the real victims of the drug war) is asinine. Ignoring frozen welfare rates, the lack of a national housing plan, the cost of living, renovictions, residential school abuse, and the myriad other reasons as to why someone might become or remain homeless in Vancouver is reckless, feckless, and the kind of thing that leads to violence.

Meanwhile, Real Housewives of Vancouver star Mary Zilba doesn’t think Tuesday’s shooting is related to the recent East Van shooting of Mia Deakin – the daughter of one of her fellow Real Housewives of Vancouver cast members. But she did say that the latter was related to gang activity, and that has opened her up to a defamation lawsuit, about which nobody will ever give a shit.

Are you happy that average Canadians only start working for themselves on June 10? Hmm, interesting question you’ve posed there, corporate newspaper! Maybe a more appropriate one would read as follows: are you happy that most corporate CEOs start working for themselves on January 29th?

B.C. group pitches $10-billion ‘environmentally responsible’ refinery. Does this just expose the contradictions inherent in green capitalism, or is it the result of massive public pressure and a step in the right direction? (Asking rhetorical questions makes me sound smart).

B.C. lawyers vote against TWU law school. Question: if lawyers are the scum of the earth, what does that make Christian lawyers?

Even the wolves are on island time, man: B.C.’s Island wolves are way more laid back than ‘big buggers’ on the grizzly-competing mainland.

Glove it or leave it: Burnaby cat burglar stealing gloves.

Honour Bound: Culver City Salads Goes Solar.

SCOUT LIST | Ten Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now And Next Week

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

DESTROYER | Vancouver indie-folk hero Dan Bejar of Destroyer plays The Rickshaw on Thursday night. The gig is in support of his latest EP Five Spanish Songs. If side projects from successful musicians are rare, EPs of the results of said side projects are even rarer, which makes shows in support of said side projects almost unheard of. So get on it!
Thu, June 12 | Doors 8pm | Rickshaw Theatre (254 E Hastings St) | $20 | DETAILS

THE FAT BADGER | The new gastropub from Espana chef Neil Taylor and Ed Perrow is now open in the old Le Gavroche location (West End). They’ve done a sweet job on the renovation and the food is predictably excellent. Must have: three miniature Yorkshire puddings with slices of perfect roast beef soaked in gravy and licked with horseradish. Bonus: the soundtrack is British to the bone.
The Fat Badger | 1616 Alberni St. | 5pm to close, 7 days a week | DETAILS

FULL BLAST | How about Chinese tacos, a tiki bar with a Tom Selleck Shrine and a little bit of ping pong this Saturday night? Even if you have some of those cool little drink umbrellas and an old Magnum PI poster in the closet and think you could pull some version of that scenario off in your own living room, you need to trust us — it’ll be way more fun (and less cleaning up on your part) if you hit the Full Blast party in East Van this weekend. Brought to you by the same team of people that came up with events like Das Lexicon and Cafeteria – expect Full Blast to involve quality food and drink, a sense of humour, and several unexpected twists. From event organizers: “You can feel it – longer nights, the thirst for beer, shorter shorts. Summer is just around the bend, and what better way to make room for it than with a summer party with a stacked lineup?” There will be music, dancing, and Chen Wei Lee (Blacktail Florist), Alain Chow (ex-Bao Bei), and Stanley Yung (Dirty Apron) will be setting up a Night Market-style hawker stand with Chinese Tacos and popsicles. There will be drinks, too, as Caroline Balhorn and Jenny Craig of Tin Can Studio will be on hand with their travelling art studio transformed into a Tin Can Tiki Bar. And there will be action, as The Biltmore Ping Pong Club will be on site to mediate casual Ping Pong battles. Bring cash, as this isn’t a commercial venue with a bank machine in the corner.
Sat, June 14 | Location disclosed upon RSVP | $5 | DETAILS

CONCERT | The CBC Music Festival goes down Saturday and the line-up is amazing: Chad VanGaalen, the Belle Game, Wake Owl, Tegan and Sara, Dan Mangan, Arkells, Hannah Georgas. The ticket price might be a little steep ($60-$75), but the talent is seriously solid and the setting – with two stages – is lovely. Gates open at 1pm and shows are staggered throughout the day (ending with Tegan and Sara’s set at 8:45pm).
Sat, June 14 | Deer Lake Park, 6450 Deer Lake Ave) | DETAILS

PARK THE CAR | Sunday is Car Free Day! That’s four street festivals, four neighbourhoods, and four tons of fun. Expect live music, spoken-word performances, dancing, hockey, more live music, bike and skateboard demos, good food, a little bit of roller disco, some locally made trinkets, and generally happy people. Who doesn’t love Car Free Day, seriously? More information over here, but the short version is as follows:
COMMERCIAL | Sun | Venables to North Grandview | 12pm-7pm | DETAILS
MAIN STREET | Sun | between Broadway & 30th | 12pm-7pm | DETAILS
WEST END | Sun | Denman from Robson to Davie | 12pm-6pm | DETAILS
KITS | Kits likes the idea of Car Free Day too, but rather than shut down 4th Ave, expect individual block parties in the hood on Saturday & Sunday| DETAILS

FOOTIE | Flat screens have been mounted, beer orders have been appropriately adjusted and temporary licences have been issued to jersey and flag-selling vendors. Commercial Drive is ready for the World Cup. The 20th World Cup “kicks off” kicks off at 1pm on Thursday (Croatia vs Brazil) and unless you’re brave enough and flush enough to be headed to Brazil to take it all in, The Drive is where you’ll want to be. Matches run June 13 through to Thursday June 26 with the finals taking place on June 28-July 13 (The Commercial Drive BIA website has a handy World Cup schedule here). This weekend, we’re betting that the highest level of energy will be coursing through The Drive starting at 3pm on Saturday when England steps on the field to take on Italy. Unless you’re fan enough to claim a seat early on Saturday morning and hold that seat throughout the day, this is going to be a standing room-only gig – and latecomers can count on that standing room being out in the street.
Now through Sunday, July 13 | Brasil & Commercial Drive | Free – just ask FIFA | DETAILS

RIDE | Velopalooza continues this week. The two week-long community-run bike fun fest has close to 70 events (rides, tours meet-ups) planned, so this is a good time to get your bike out of hibernation and back on the road. This week the big ticket has got to be the Vancouver contingent of World Naked Bike Ride, which goes down on the seawall. Brave souls will begin to congregate at Sunset Beach around noon (body painting artists will be on hand to decorate participants – as if that makes it any easier) and then streak the city starting at 2pm. Following the ride there will be a picnic, hosted by niftynude.org (who, as it turns out, also hosts a $1 nude swim at Templeton Pool on Saturday night, but that’s a whole other entry).
Now through June 22 | Various times and locations | Free | DETAILS

RESPECT | Some of the oldest trees in the city grow in Stanley Park. A few of those dudes are close to 700 years old! Just imagine the challenges they’ve survived (lightning, fire, wind storms, logging), not to mention the things they’ve seen (Royal visits, hippie concerts, murders, secret trysts). Head down to the Lost Lagoon Nature House this Sunday to join a guided tour given by the Stanley Park Ecology Society that will familiarize participants with locations and individual histories of some of our ‘great-grandfather trees’.
Sun, June 15 | 1:30-3:30pm | Lost Lagoon Nature House, Stanley Park | DETAILS

DRAW DOWN | Get your pencils ready because this weekend welcomes the Vancouver Draw Down. On Saturday, from Marpole straight down to Crab Park and Dunbar clear across to East Van, 50 free hands-on drawing workshops are set to pop-up at community centres, galleries, museums, and parks around the city. It will be difficult to avoid all the doodling, so why not join in? Draw Down isn’t about getting it perfect, it’s about the fun that can be had with a blank piece of paper and a crayon, pencil, pen, piece of chalk, or paintbrush. Take part in a fascinating ‘Talking Hands‘ workshop in the Celebration Hall at Mountain View Cemetery (5455 Fraser St) in which local artist Shirley Wiebe reveals how to combine personal hand gestures and handwritten words to create a beautiful image; hit Collage Collage (621 Kingsway) for the Draw Me A Story workshop; make your way to the West End Community Centre (870 Denman St) to experiment with drawing blindfolded; or check out the Dead or Alive: Still Life & Life Drawing event at the Emily Carr Concourse Gallery.
Sat, June 14 | Various times and locations | Free | DETAILS

FOREST TO FARM | There’s a day of adventure planned by the The British Columbia Institute of Agrologists this Saturday. Open to the public, “From the Forest to the Farm: A Day of Exploring at UBC” starts with a walk on the super cool Greenheart Canopy Walkway at the UBC Botanical Garden where you can take in the coastal temperate rainforest from a unique perspective. The exploration then moves along to UBC Farm for lunch (think organic field greens, red wine braised beef short ribs, wild BC mushrooms, baked wild salmon, smoked tofu, herbed potatoes) and a guided tour of the various areas of the farm, from apple orchard and medicinal plant gardens to The Children’s Learning Garden and The Indigenous Food Hub garden (you’ll get a real sense of the scope and depth of what the farm offers and how it enriches our city). Bonus: Snacks and refreshments will also be provided along the way.
Saturday, June 14 | 9:30am-4pm | Meet at The UBC Botanical Garden Gift Shop | DETAILS

EAT LOCAL | Grab locally grown produce from good people at your neighbourhood farmer’s market while you still can. You won’t want to look back and wish that you had made it to more markets!
Main Street Thornton Park | Wednesday | 3pm–7pm | Main Street Station at Terminal | DETAILS
Oak Street | Wednesdays | 3-7pm | Oak and 49th | DETAILS
Yaletown | Thursdays | 2-6pm | Mainland between Davie & Helmcken | DETAILS
Trout Lake | Saturdays | 9am-2pm | North Parking Lot, John Hendry Park | DETAILS
West End | Saturdays | 9am-2pm | 1100 Block of Comox (across from Nelson Park) | DETAILS
Kits | Sundays | 10am-2pm | 2690 Larch @ 10th | DETAILS
Main Street | June 4 | 3pm-7pm | 1100 Block Main (Thornton Park) | DETAILS
Lonsdale Quay | Saturdays | 10am-3pm | East Plaza 123 Carrie Cates Court, North Van | DETAILS
Ambleside | Sundays | 10am-3pm | 1500 Bellevue (between 15th & 16th), West Van | DETAILS

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy (but faithful) camera.

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TEA & TWO SLICES | On Hidden Marijuana And Damn It Feels Good To Be A Gangster!

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by Sean Orr | Why is that all the very best headlines start with “Cops not pleased with…”? It’s a mystery, but Cops not pleased with Vancouver’s hidden weed. But…it’s not illegal if it’s free, right?

Women warned to steer clear of gangsters after Real Housewives of Vancouver star’s daughter injured in drive-by. Yeah, ok, but maybe stop making them so damn desirable. I mean, did you see the guy’s hair and the size of his wristwatch? I mean, woof! There’s probably something about the logic of late-stage capitalism here, but Damn it Feels Good to be a Gangster (except for the part when they shoot you).

The oracles at the Vancouver Sun can see the future and there’s absolutely nothing to worry about: Opinion: Pipeline fear factor is inappropriate. Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Pipeline. Elsewhere in the same paper? Leaking natural gas wells spew methane, report warns.

There is absolutely no chance that “a wind-driven plume fire, if the gas hits an ignition source, would kill everyone within 1.6 kilometres and severe third-degree burns will be experienced for up to 3.5 kilometres”: Lions Bay council opposes LNG tankers.

I Asked You, Tyee Reader, Is My Generation Screwed?. I’ll let Paul Krugman answer that one (via Pricetags):

Well, think about global warming from the point of view of someone who grew up taking Ayn Rand seriously, believing that the untrammeled pursuit of self-interest is always good and that government is always the problem, never the solution. Along come some scientists declaring that unrestricted pursuit of self-interest will destroy the world, and that government intervention is the only answer. It doesn’t matter how market-friendly you make the proposed intervention; this is a direct challenge to the libertarian worldview. And the natural reaction is denial — angry denial. Read or watch any extended debate over climate policy and you’ll be struck by the venom, the sheer rage, of the denialists.

Related? Post-Hipster — A New Brand of (Tr)illegitimate Hu$tle. He forgot about #normcore.

Everything is going to be alright (sic): Vancouver Boomers Sitting on $163 Billion of Mortgage Free Property. Supply side economics will save us all!

Which MLAs Send Kids to Private Schools? We Asked. More of this please, Tyee, and less of Thanks to My Grandma’s Robot.

I don’t know what this is, but it sounds interesting: American Federation of Musicians in NYC fines the entire Vancouver Executive Board 50K each.

TEA & TWO SLICES | On Bad Heroin And The Steamy Back Pages Of The Georgia Straight

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by Sean Orr | The writing on the wall: Police raid house in East Vancouver, with guns drawn, on pretext of anti-pipeline graffiti. Right…it was about the graffiti and not monitoring spying on activists. Hide your “particular coloured” baseball caps, black knapsacks, black hoodies, and dark jeans, folks.

The new sex work legislation explained. So many more Q’s than A’s. Will the criminalization of clients make sex work more dangerous? Will escorts pull a Heidi Fleiss and expose all the politicians who use their services? And what will happen to the Georgia Straight’s adult classifieds section now that advertising sexual services is illegal?

What happens when you shut-down an underground safe-injection site? Vancouver Police issue warning after seven heroin overdoses today in DTES. Related: Judge grants injunction allowing doctors to prescribe heroin to group of Vancouver addicts.

Vancouver’s NPA keeping its mayoral candidate’s name secret for two more weeks. We will know who the new candidate is when the smoke from the ballots turns white.

Everyone’s a critic. It’s called Twitter. Nobody’s a critic: Who holds journalists to account in Canada In the words of a wise man named Cartman, “I’m doing the best I can…”

For example, look at how the CBC uses moral relativism and sinophobia in this headline: Marine areas better protected by China than Canada, report finds. But hey, at least we’re better than India, right?

Everyone’s talking about the weather: The Canadian Government has Forbidden Meteorologists to Discuss Climate Change. Speaking of hurricanes: Hurricanes With Female Names Kill More People, Study Finds. #yesallwomen

Tar sands and the patriarchy are irrelevant: calling for a new campus activism. In other words: “The way you talk about broad sociopolitical issues is distracting from bullshit gimmicky party events at our particular educational institution, so shut up until you can do it in a way that I like” – Reid Blakely.

World’s first off-leash cat park to open in Vancouver. When satire hurts. Like when it actually physically hurts.

This has got to be the third most popular post of all-time on Vancouver is Awesome: This is the best stop sign in the Lower Mainland. Period.

SCOUT LIST | Ten Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now And Next Week

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

CELEBRATE | A parklet is such a clever (and adorable) concept. It’s a tiny green space (roughly the size of two street side parking spaces) that transforms a street into a gathering place. What an ingenious way to repurpose little slabs of concrete and increase connectedness and community at the same time. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to see these pop up at regular intervals around the city? If you’re curious about how a park the size of a few parking spaces feels, looks, and impacts a community, head to 21st & Main where The French Quarter Parklet will officially launch this Friday. “Occupying two street side parking spaces just west of Main Street on 21st Avenue, Mount Pleasant’s newest public space will provide a destination for passersby to rest, relax and ruminate while enjoying the sites and sounds of the vibrant neighbourhood…Key features include timber planters and benches” And here’s the extra awesome bit: it’s located right beside a chocolate shop. Chocolaterie de la Nouvelle France sponsored the development of the Parklet and will play a big role in Friday’s celebration. To wit, Anne-Genevieve Poitras, the shop’s owner and chocolatiere, has planned an offering of French sweets to compliment the day. Expect gelato, organic cotton candy, chocolates and Liege waffles. I can imagine it now: a sun-dappled afternoon, a good book, and a fresh (chocolate dipped?) waffle on a beautifully designed bench in pint-sized Mount Pleasant park. Vancouver can be pretty great. Congratulations to all involved in making this project come to life.
Friday, June 6 | 3-9pm | 198 East 21st Ave | DETAILS

RIDE | Velopalooza is a two week-long community-run bike fun fest that goes down from June 5th to the 22nd. With close to 70 events (rides, tours and meet-ups) planned, this is a good time to get your bike out of hibernation and back on the road. This week you can participate in the Logan’s Run Scavenger Hunt, a DIY Soundbike Ride, something called Soft Serve Sunday (presented by East Van Bike Polo), or just take an easy seawall cycle.
June 5 – 22 | Various times and locations | Free | DETAILS

MAKER FAIRE | Mini Maker Faire hits the PNE Forum this weekend. A cross between a science fair, a community fair, and a farmer’s market, Maker Faire will have everything from tiny houses and Lego to Makerbrarians and all manner of robots. This is an event that celebrates our power to make, remake, and create things, so clear your schedule, snap up a few tickets and roll up your sleeves for a fun day of exhibits, demonstrations, performances, and displays. Whether its pyrotechnics or food growing or something in between, you’ll be sure to find something within that inspires!
June 7 + 8 | 10am-6pm | PNE Forum (2901 E Hastings St) | $15 | DETAILS

FASHION | Lauren and Lyndsey from local clothing company Hey Jude are opening a summer boutique pop-up this week. This team really knows what they’re doing when it comes to curating seasonal selections of ‘on trend’ clothing and accessories. Veterans of the vintage pop-up scene in Vancouver, their style hits the intersection of classic and contemporary, structured and bohemian. Expect to see silks and cottons, pastels, metallic and monochromatic neutrals, as well as one-of-a-kind accessories and jewelry pieces. Good news, boys: this time around Hey Jude will also have menswear on offer.
Now – Sunday, June 8 | 11-7pm Daily | 196 Kingsway (@ 10th Ave) | DETAILS

PAUSE | Sunday is World Oceans Day and there are a multitude of ways to consider something that covers 71 percent of the Earth’s surface and contains 97 percent of the planet’s water. Most obviously, you can take some time out to connect with nature by heading to a beach and touching base with the real, salty thing, but you could also take a trip to the Aquarium where Dr. Peter Ross (the Aquarium’s director of the new Ocean Pollution Research Program) and Dr. Hans Schreier (professor in the Faculty of Land & Food Systems at the University of British Columbia) will talk about how we can protect our oceans (and particularly our marine mammals) from urban water pollution. Finally, consider an hour-long workshop at The Homeseader’s Emporium where there will be a homemade green-cleaning workshop that will instruct participants on how to make simple, ocean-safe cleaners for the kitchen, laundry, and bathroom. This workshop will include demos and visual aids of various recipes, complete with hands-on testing and evaluation.
LECTURE | Sun, June 8 | 6:30pm | Vancouver Aquarium | $10.50 | DETAILS
WORKSHOP | Sun, June 8 | 5:30pm | Homesteader’s Emporium | $10 | DETAILS

WILD | Although the city and people of Vancouver demonstrate a respect for (and connection to) nature that is at the core of our civic identity, we also know that this city, like any city, has dramatically altered the natural environment around it. The Museum of Vancouver is currently showing Rewilding Vancouver, an exhibition that does its best – using everything from taxidermy specimens and clever dioramas to video installations and soundscapes – to get us thinking about ways in which we shape nature and the ways in which nature shapes us. As programming to support this exhibition, the MOV is hosting an edible plant workshop this weekend. As explained by the Urban Herb School (leading the walk), “Through a combination of ancient, largely forgotten knowledge and more recent scientific discoveries, uncover the nutritional and medicinal properties of the oft-ignored plants that grow all around us: whether through the cracks in the pavement or in our parks.” Learn to identify herbs and edible plants in the Vanier Park area and take that knowledge and apply it to the parks, back alleys and green spaces around your own neighbourhoods.
Sun, June 8 | 3pm talk, 4pm walk | MOV, 1100 Chestnut | $22 | DETAILS

ITALIAN DAY | Italian Day takes over Commercial Drive this Sunday. Hooray for car free street parties! There are few things more intoxicatingly ‘Vancouver’ than a little sunshine on your face as you walk up the middle of The Drive through a gentle haze of incense, weed, and curbside barbecue smoke while you take in community group tables, food booths and live music. Add to all of that more than a few options for a good cup of coffee, a display of classic cars and the occasional impromptu bocce game and you have a solidly inspired Sunday. Celebrate everything ‘Made in Italy,’ from inventions to food. “Italy’s unmatched sense of style will be the centrepiece at this year’s event” so expect a focus on that distinctive Italian flare. Festival organizers will install a large, walk-through museum exhibit to show off some of the most profound Italian inventions (items such as the piano, radio, telephone, bicycle, eyeglasses, and – most important of all – the coffee machine). Remember to leave the car at home, as driving hereabouts will be impossible.
Sun, June 8 | 12pm-8pm | Commercial Drive (Venables to Grandview) | Free | DETAILS

GO INDIE | Music Waste is on! The annual independent art, music and comedy festival will spread across numerous city blocks to bring you close to 100 bands playing at a variety of venues – all within reasonable walking distances from one another. This year’s line-up could keep anyone solidly busy from Thursday afternoon straight through to Sunday night with short breaks for food and sleep. A series of comedy gigs, art exhibits, and performance art compliment the main event. The gigs and happenings are so numerous and so good that it’s pointless to try to narrow them down (do, however, note that Sean Orr and NEEDS play the Cobalt on Thursday night). Skip over to the Waste website for a look at the schedule and to customize your own must-see shortlist. And get this: full festival passes are only $15!
June 5-8 | Various times and venues | $15 | DETAILS

CULTURE | In The House Festival brings arts and cultural performances into the living rooms and backyards of East Vancouver homes, and not in the way you’d think (ie. not on the flatscreen). They organize Vancouver artists and performers to put on intimate live shows in multiple private residences (porches, backyards, garages, kitchens, living rooms) in the Victoria Drive and Napier area. 2014 is the 11th year of this community-driven (and hosted) event. Ticket prices range from single show tickets for adults priced at $15 to a four show pass ($50), or a full weekend pass for $95.
June 6-8 | Various times and locations around Napier & Victoria | $various | DETAILS

EAT LOCAL | Grab locally grown produce from good people at your neighbourhood farmer’s market while you still can. You won’t want to look back and wish that you had made it to more markets!
Main Street Thornton Park | Wednesday | 3pm–7pm | Main Street Station at Terminal | DETAILS
Oak Street | Wednesdays | 3-7pm | Oak and 49th | DETAILS
Yaletown | May 29 | 2-6pm | Mainland between Davie & Helmcken DETAILS
Trout Lake | May 31 | 9am-2pm | North Parking Lot, John Hendry Park | DETAILS
West End | May 31 | 9am-2pm | 1100 Block of Comox (across from Nelson Park) | DETAILS
Kits | June 1 | 10am-2pm | 2690 Larch @ 10th | DETAILS
Main Street | June 4 | 3pm-7pm | 1100 Block Main (Thornton Park) | DETAILS
Lonsdale Quay | Saturdays | 10am-3pm | East Plaza 123 Carrie Cates Court, North Van | DETAILS
Ambleside | Sundays | 10am-3pm | 1500 Bellevue (between 15th & 16th), West Van | DETAILS

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy (but faithful) camera.

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TEA & TWO SLICES | On Supersucking And Desperately Seeking ‘Ultra Rich Asian Girls’

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by Sean Orr | Hedge your bets: Vancouver: Superstar city or just a safe haven for global investors? Some people might say that we supersuck.

Besides, it’s all about to come crashing down, right? 45,000 Chinese millionaires left hanging as Canada ends wealth-based immigration scheme. This is a really important topic but the article’s author appears to compare Chinese immigrants to an invasive species and I honestly couldn’t keep reading with a straight face after this gem: “…just as your rage-kettle was reaching starting to whistle.” So I moved on to reading stories that matter…

Vancouver Reality Show Seeks ‘Ultra Rich Asian Girls’. I wonder if it will look anything like this: Extremely Wealthy Father and Son.

The flip side: Sanctuary City from Below: dismantling the colonial city of Vancouver. “A city that cannot even provide the most basic human need of housing and shelter to its residents is, arguably by definition, not a city of sanctuary.” 

Apologists wanted: Will Vancouver Ever Be Affordable? ”Perhaps we’d care less if we didn’t care so much…” That’s a pretty absurd little piece of solipsism. Stop telling everyone that your rent is high and maybe your rent will go down? “Now, a third of Vancouverites do spend more than the recommended 30 percent of income on housing. (And almost half of renters do.) But that’s because incomes are lower…” Eureka! Because nobody ever talks about fair wages when they talk about affordability.

Is Vancouver ready for another Olympics? Were we even ready for the first one? Go Away World.

Canadian Forces spent virtually all of 2013 watching Idle No More protesters. “It sounds like a lot of effort and work to keep track of a group just because they hoist a banner somewhere…” Maybe that effort could be redirected to, oh…I don’t know, missing and murdered aboriginal women?

Underground Safe-Injection Site Forced to Close. Blame The Province newspaper for inventing harm reduction, 62 years ago: Fruit of Greed. Related: 1,000 Crosses in Oppenheimer Park.

Bonus: Vancouver’s Biggest Rock Music Networking Event.

TEA & TWO SLICES | On Turks & Caicos And Stephen Harper Being Prone To Fits Of Rage

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by Sean Orr | The Province newspaper weighs in on the Isla Vista shooting and misses the point: We all should fight women-hating losers. “Most men aren’t rapists, respect women and are turned off by such talk…” The point is, the shooter wasn’t a loser by society’s shallow standards. He was good looking and owned a BMW, and all his life he had been led to believe that this combo was the secret to “acquiring” women.

Related: ”The problem is that our society makes every murder/rape/harassment a special case perpetrated by a single deranged individual. The enemy is not one man; it’s ALL MEN.” - Chris Eng.

Also related: ‘No Way To Prevent This,’ Says Only Nation Where This Regularly Happens.

Engage tha muthafuckin’ base, yo: To win, Stephen Harper needs to bring in a new abortion law. Is this reverse psychology? Or is Alex Tsakumis totally just winging it?

Breaking: Stephen Harper starts angst-ridden screamo band! Stephen Harper prone to fits of rage and growing increasingly isolated. Now he knows what BC feels like. Now he knows what Bart Simpson feels like?

Neo-post-colonialism: Turks and Caicos premier talks tourism with Stephen Harper. “Canada needs a Hawaii…” Yeah, just without all that messy American-style imperialism.

I saw this little nugget buried in The Province the other day: Feds relax rules on how BC politicians can spend $2.76 billion of gas tax money. Cool, now local politicians can’t complain about anything ever again! Except, of course, housing the homeless and whatnot, but who cares about that?! Subway to UBC!

What happened to Vancouver’s civic left? I believe I can answer this question with an art show.

But also this: Who’s Lobbying in Surrey? “Vancouver, the biggest city in the province, has been silent on the concept of a lobbyist registry…” We don’t even get to see the visitor sign-in sheets.

I blame the Fraser Institute (as per usual): Letter from B.C. teacher to Christy Clark goes viral. I don’t think The Sun really understands what “going viral” means yet but that’s ok. It’s a very good letter. Also, I’m guessing Hamish Clark’s class doesn’t look like this.

Gambier as a gambit: Government sets logging sights on ‘precious jewel’ of BC forests. Of course, it would probably be the side that you can’t see from the Sea to Sky. In that case it would end up looking like one of those adorable shorn nape undercuts that the girls are loving so much nowadays. So current!

NIMBY Narc: East Vancouver neighbourhood plastered with posters imploring woman to ‘stop selling weed to our kids’. Man, that’s nothing! I once bought weed off a baby.

“Upworthy” creeping into local headlines: They installed $10,000 pillars but now the City of Burnaby wants them gone. Yeah, and what happens next will blow your mind! Good thing I have Downworthy installed on my browser.

Bonus: Start your week right with the VIA weekly playlist.

SCOUT LIST | Ten Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now And Next Week

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

COLLECT | The Contemporary Art Gallery runs an off-site residency space at The Burrard Marina (1655 Whyte Ave) called Field House Studio. New York-based artist Marie Lorenz is currently the artist-in-residence and she is working on building a boat from pieces of driftwood that have been gathered from the beaches and shorelines of the lower mainland. This Thursday night, Lorenz will be at the Maritime Museum (joined by Vancouver artists Rebecca Bayer and Josh Hite) to talk about beachcombing, her process, the inspiration that can come from using found objects, and the beauty of nature. On Sunday, Lorenz puts words into action by leading a beachcombing expedition along Kits Beach. Following the walk, participants are encouraged to stick around and use what they’ve collected to create crafts.
Thu, May 29 | 6pm | Maritime Museum (1905 Ogden Ave) | Free with admission | DETAILS
Sun, June 1 | 1pm | Hadden Park Field House (1015 Maple St.) | Free | DETAILS

CONNECT | Jumpstart your brain by exposing it to some thought-provoking content this week at Fuel (Future of Urbanity, the Environment, and our Lifestyle). The new event series aims to connect innovators from around the world with local entrepreneurs, designers, and community builders to see what happens when they sit down and talk shop. The really interesting twist is that the organizers have matched presenters from different fields to come together to explore aspects/impacts of four sectors that are relevant to our city: Food, Design, Sustainability and Technology. “We all go to events in our own sectors, be they food events, tech events, design events, or what have you. It’s all very comfortable and we always know many of the people in the room. FUEL is your opportunity to get out of your silo and talk about bigger issues. Fish folks talking to design folks? Something interesting is bound to happen!” Expect panel discussions, workshops and trend forecasts. This is seriously interesting stuff, so skip over to the Fuel website to read the full line-up of events.
May 29 | Various times + prices | Vancouver Playhouse Theatre (600 Hamilton St.) | DETAILS
May 30 | Various times + prices | Museum of Vancouver (1100 Chestnut St.) | DETAILS

RIDE YOUR BIKE | As we transition from spring in to summer and start to see more days of dry pavement, biking to get around becomes not only sensible, but also enjoyable again. Coincidentally, this is bike-to-work week and you’ll find all sorts of fun perks to riding to the office. There will be over 50 “Celebration Stations” across the city offering bike commuters things like free bike repairs, coffee, snacks and bike route maps. If you aren’t a year-round rider, this is a great time to lug your bike out of hibernation. A spring tune-up is always a good idea before you lay foot to pedal. If you’re looking for a bike shop that can help you get things in order, The Standard Bike Shop in Chinatown/Strathcona is a good place to start. Pro tip: The Standard is having their first birthday party this Sunday. Expect music, a BBQ, races, a pie-eating contest (note, if you will, that The Pie Shoppe is only a few doors down from Standard Bike), and general good times.
Bike to Work Week | Now through May 30 | DETAILS
Standard Bike Shop Birthday Celebration | Sunday, June 1 | 751 Gore Ave | DETAILS

SALT WALKS | Last August, artist Randy Lee Cutler led a series of walks through Chinatown that focused on salt. These began at the Access Gallery with a salt tasting and a run down of the different ways to consider salt (as medicine, a method of food preservation, a flavour, and as a crystal structure). Cutler then took participants on a tour around Chinatown to visit with shop-keepers who explained how salt influenced their business “whether as a flavour, a remedy or a molecular formation.” As she went, Cutler filmed the experience and the resultant film, Salt Walks: Three Movements, screens this Saturday in the Hall of One Hundred Rivers at the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden. There will be a salt tasting led by Cutler following the movie.
Sat, May 31 | 2–4pm | Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Gardens (578 Carrall St.) | DETAILS 

DRINK | It’s Craft Beer Week, folks, and with over 60 breweries participating in 21 events there’s a lot to drink and do. Craft Beer Bingo? Check. Cicerone vs Sommelier? You bet. Beer dinners? Absolutely. Some events are already sold out, so don’t dilly-dally on the rest.
May 30 – June 7 | Various times/venues | DETAILS

MAKE | How great would it be to make your own mozzarella, burrata, or Oaxacan string cheese? Super great, right? But where to begin? Head to The Homesteaders Emporium this Wednesday for a 2-hour class that will teach you how to turn milk into delicious, stretchy ‘pasta-filata’ cheeses. This demonstration-style class will give you the basis for understanding how you can pull off the processes at home. Cheese is big in this town and cheesemaking courses sell out in a heartbeat, so don’t sit around contemplating whether or not you’re going to jump in for too long. Just jump! If you can’t score a ticket, Homesteaders has all manner of cheese-making equipment, literature, and basic know how. It’s a great place to start a new DIY project. If you can’t wait and need cheese immediately following the workshop, it’s worth noting that Les Amis Du Formage is only a block away at 843 E. Hastings.
May 28 | 6:30-8:30pm | Homesteader’s Emporium (649 E Hastings) | $35 | DETAILS 

POP-UP | The good folks behind the excellent Le Marché St George are prepping for a summer pop-up shop. From Le Marché: “White linen, unbleached canvas, panama hats, days at the beach, laying in the grass, laundry on the line, simple food on simple dishes. These are some of the things that have inspired this summers Pop up Shop.” Poke your head into the tiny corner store and check out all the gorgeous textiles. Think linens, beautiful blankets, ceramics by Janaki Larsen, art work by Klee Larsen, sturdy leather satchels, clothing by Mandula and, on Saturday only, Victory Gardens will be there selling a selection of wee vegetable plants ready to find a home in your garden.
May 31 – June 8 | 10am-6pm | Le Marché St. George (4393 St. George) | DETAILS

FAIR IN THE SQUARE | Fair in the Square will be held in Victory Square Park this Sunday. It’s always nice to see the little plot of land at the intersection of Pender/Hastings/Cambie come alive with community events and activities. Expect community groups with information tables, art, live music, a free BBQ lunch, some sword-fighting demonstrations (because yeah), yoga (obviously) and lots and lots of cupcakes. This event, put on by The Central City Foundation, is free and worth a visit for its uplifting spirit of community.
Sunday, June 1 | 11-2 | Victory Square Park (Hastings @ Cambie) | DETAILS

DESIGN | Local designer Kate Duncan makes stunning furniture by marrying simple lines and a clean, modern aesthetic with a high level of craftsmanship. Her work is of the caliber that commands respect of other designers – even her line of cutting boards and serving trays are outstanding. So when we heard that she was pulling together an interior design and home décor pop-up shop that would showcase her furniture alongside the works of a handful of like-minded designers, we were stoked. “Address” continues this week at The Chinatown Experiment. Expect art, textiles, hardware, lighting, and more – all uncomplicated and imbued with beautiful style.
Now – June 4 | daily 11am – 7pm | The Chinatown Experiment (434 Columbia St.) | DETAILS

CINEMA | Late in 2013, the Cineworks Independent Filmmakers Society announced a competition for local filmmakers to “…write an original 10-minute script based on eight lines of open-ended dialogue from Atom Egoyan’s award-winning The Sweet Hereafter.” Many aspiring filmmakers rose to the challenge and the winning three will show their short films this week. Sweetness Follows directed by Christopher O’Brien, Karaoke or Die directed by Blair Dykes and I Really Like You directed by Jason Karman will premiere prior to the full-length screening of The Sweet Hereafter on Wednesday night. Grab a seat and see what Vancouver talent has to offer!
Wed, May 28 | 7pm | The Cinematheque (1131 Howe St) | $11 | DETAILS 

EAT LOCAL | We add more Farmers Markets to roster this week: the West End market opens on Saturday and next Wednesday (June 4) sees the start of the Main Street Market. Farmers Markets are a great place to stock up on fresh, local food. Grab spot prawns while you can, salad greens, fresh asparagus, vegetables, and herbs, as well as cheese, artisan breads, preserves, honey, wild salmon, cookies and pies. Support the people who grow our food! 
Yaletown | May 29 | 2-6pm | Mainland between Davie & Helmcken DETAILS
Trout Lake | May 31 | 9am-2pm | North Parking Lot, John Hendry Park | DETAILS
West End | May 31 | 9am-2pm | 1100 Block of Comox (across from Nelson Park) | DETAILS 
Kits | June 1 | 10am-2pm | 2690 Larch @ 10th | DETAILS
Main Street  | June 4 | 3pm-7pm | 1100 Block Main (Thornton Park) | DETAILS

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy (but faithful) camera.

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