GOODS | The Biltmore Cabaret Announces “Songs Of Neil Young” Tribute April 22 & 23

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward Street in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward Street in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The GOODS from The Biltmore Cabaret

Vancouver, BC | The Biltmore Cabaret’s continued commitment to fostering local talent shines on in our ‘Songs of …’ Series. The ‘Songs of Neil Young’ Tribute Nights on Tuesday, April 22 and Wednesday, April 23 will feature the best of Vancouver’s singing and songwriting talent as they put their personal spin on classic Canadiana. Previous nights have included ‘Songs of Bob Dylan’ and ‘Songs of Bruce Springsteen’. These editions feature eight acts each at an incredible $6 a pop. The line-up includes: Louise Burns, Jordan Klassen, Johnny De Courcy, War Baby, Failing, Dominique Fricot, The Wild North, Altered By Mom, Skye Wallace, Rolla Olak, Lydia Hol, David Newberry, Shuyler Jansem, Redbitd, The Reckoners, and Heard In The Mountains. Learn more about the events after the jump… Read more

SEEN IN VANCOUVER #491 | 10 Essential Addresses That Typify Today’s Chinatown

by Ken Tsui | Vancouver’s Chinatown is a neighbourhood with over a century of cultural history crammed within a handful of blocks. There are countless Chinese stories embedded in the architecture and within the street front businesses. Though it’s on the cusp of being a certified UNESCO historical site, change is still very much afoot in Chinatown, making right now a very interesting time to explore it. The neighbourhood – it’s very plain to see – is flourishing with new businesses. Young entrepreneurs from across the city are opening up alongside traditional herbalists, restaurants, butchers, green grocers and kitchen equipment suppliers that have operated in Chinatown for several decades, making it a diverse mix of the treasured old guard and the welcomed new.  This is a (by no means complete) guide to some of these most treasured places. Take your empty belly and a couple of hours out of your day to explore…

Chinatown Supermarket | 239 Keefer Street | 604-685-5423
Navigating the myriad of neighbourhood grocers in Chinatown can be an intimidating experience, but this place is a friendly one­-stopper. With fresh produce, meats, and classic Chinese ingredients, it has practically everything you need to put together a delicious and authentic Cantonese meal.

New Town Bakery | 158 E Pender Street | 604-681­-1828
New Town is a regular haunt for Chinatown elders and a stopover for out-­of-­towners who flock to Pender Street for their steamed bun fix. It’s the definitive Chinese bakery, offering a wide range of sweet and savoury classics such as BBQ pork buns (some of the best in town), pineapple buns, and egg tarts. New Town has columns of steamers stacked full of pillowy steamed buns ranging from Sichuan pork and “Chicken Deluxe” to a vegetarian alternative.

Dollar Meat Store | 266 E Pender Street | 604-681­-1052
Don’t let the name fool you! The award-winning Dollar Meats is an old guard butcher shop that serves up some of Chinatown’s most delicious Chinese BBQ and cured meats. BBQ ducks and a crispy whole hog usually hang in the window while sausages and Chinese bacon cure to deliciousness in the shop. In operation for over 30 years, Dollar Meats takes pride in their artisan products and remains a Vancouver institution for traditional Chinese barbecue

Matchstick Coffee Roasters | 213 East Georgia St. | 604-336-­0213
Expanding from their original Fraserhood location to Georgia Street this year, Matchstick Coffee boasts the best coffee in Chinatown (it’s also one of the few places in the neighbourhood where you can get a cup of coffee before 8am). Along with the standard baked goods (excellent croissants), Matchstick Coffee offers a toast bar and dinner options like Mac and Cheese, plus a selection of local beer on tap.

Phnom Penh Restaurant | 244 East Georgia St. | 604-682­-5777
Butter beef, deep fried lemon pepper chicken wings, and hot and sour soup are the regular barn burners that keep people coming back to this Vietnamese/Cambodian treasure. When former New York chef-turned-celebrity food writer Anthony Bourdain was asked where he liked to eat in Vancouver, he simply replied “Phnom Penh.” He’s not alone, as evidenced by the fact that its large dining room is eternally bustling, even at unlikely hours.

Bao Bei Chinese Brasserie | 163 Keefer St. | 604-688­-0876
The award-­winning Bao Bei Chinese Brasserie strikes a fine balance in preserving culture through food. Chef Joel Watanabe’s menus are inspired by traditional Chinese flavours and ingredients but are prepared with modern culinary techniques. Bao Bei is a reflection of the modern Chinese experience, a delicious meeting place between the new and old.

Tinland Cookware | 260 East Pender St. | 604-608-­0787
Chinatown would not be complete without an unpretentious kitchen supply store. You won’t find brand name cookware here but they’re equipped with just about every single size of pot, pan, clear plastic storage container, ceramic bowl, and cooking utensil. Tinland has practically every tool you’ll ever need to outfit your kitchen at an affordable price.

Bestie | 105 East Pender | 604-620-­1175
Clinton McDougall and Dane Brown’s sausage and beer parlour specializing in currywurst is one of Chinatown’s most exciting new developments. It’s a perfect example of the new style of up and coming businesses that are taking a chance on the area. It just so happens that they’re also some of the friendliest, most charming folks on the block. Bestie may not be a typical Chinatown destination, but it gives Vancouverites of every stripe good reason to visit Pender Street.

Continental Herbal | 278 East Pender St. | 604-677-­3334
Continental Herbal is filled floor-­to-­ceiling with every herbal remedy and traditional Chinese dried good imaginable, including dried starfish. Even if you’re not entirely sure how to use any of it (including said dried starfish), Continental Herbal has you covered. They keep an in-­house herbalist in the back of the store who is always ready to fill a prescription. Beyond herbal remedies, Continental also has an impressive tea collection and a staff that gladly walks anyone who is interested through it.

Bamboo Village Trading Company | 135 E Pender Street | 604-662-­3300
Bamboo Village, located on Pender Street, is chock-a-block with cheap and cheerful antiques and homewares. The shop is a vibrant encapsulation of all things decorative, walking a very fine line between practicality and Chinatown kitsch. From an impressive array of paper lanterns and ornately painted ceramic bowls to Mao propaganda posters, exploring the visually striking, wall­-to-­wall collection at Bamboo Village is an adventure in discovering the things you never thought you were looking for.

GOODS | The Chinatown Experiment Is Set To Host New Series Of Pop Ups This Month

The Chinatown Experiment is located at 434 Columbia St. in Vancouver’s vibrant Chinatown | chinatownexperiment.com

The Chinatown Experiment is located at 434 Columbia St. in Vancouver’s vibrant Chinatown | chinatownexperiment.com

The GOODS from The Chinatown Experiment

Vancouver, BC | From shopping to art exhibits, there’s something for everyone this month at The Chinatown Experiment. Take a look…

March 31 – April 7 | Obviously Chic
Women’s online boutique brings their brand of shabby chic to Vancouver.

April 9 – 14 | Riverlife
Solo art exhibit by vancouver based artist Hamish Todd.

April 11- 13 | Güd
Güd, a fabulous new line of natural personal beauty from the makers of Burt’s Bees, is opening a pop-up shop this April in Greenstems, an award winning florist located at 315 Abbott St. in Gastown.

April 18 – 21 | Terminal City: Rewired
Architect and visual artist, Peter Ridgeway presents a multi-media art exhibition.

April 29 | Neighbourhood Photographs
The Chinatown Experiment presents their 2nd Neighbourhood group exhibit. Read more

HEADS UP | “The Postcard Show” Set To Open At The Remington Gallery On April 5th

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by Grady Mitchell | Just over a year ago, Curator Paulina De La Paz organized the first Postcard Show after noticing the lack of platforms for emerging artists and curators in Vancouver. On Saturday, April 5 the show’s fourth volume will open at The Remington Gallery (108 E Hastings) at 7 PM, granting young artists, especially recent graduates, a chance to exhibit their work in Vancouver and internationally. For this edition, the artists will be creating their postcard-size pieces within the greater theme of “Transformation.”

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Works by Frazer Adams, Tony Yin Tak Chu, Mia Dungeon, Andrea Hooge, James Knight, Guillem Rovira, Carley Stadelmann

Most of the forty-five artists have contributed multiple postcards, which means there will be plenty to look at – and bid on. Every piece is for sale, starting at $10 in auction-style bidding. As you’d expect with such a stacked roster, the styles are eclectic, spanning photography, painting, illustration, textiles, origami, and even more unique mediums. Andea Hooge, for instance, specializes in scratch boarding; she coats a surface in paint and scratches away layers to create an image. Another artist in the show, Carley Stadlemann, has built her own Harmonograph, a device that takes sound waves and translates them visually into spiralling, precise, and hypnotizing patterns.

If young talent and affordable original artwork aren’t enough to draw you to the show, then consider this: the fourth volume will be Vancouver’s last Postcard Show for some time. After this, Paulina plans to take the exhibition international, starting with Mexico City.

Learn more about the Postcard Show and keep up to date with their TumblrTwitter, and on Facebook.

SCOUT LIST: 10 Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now & Next Week

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

MAKE | Scoot in to Homesteaders Emporium for a one hour workshop on Wednesday that will lay out a plan for you to make milk from nuts at home. That’s everything from how to choose and prepare nuts to how to process them into milk.
Wed, March 26 | 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm | Homesteader’s Emporium (649 E Hastings St) | DETAILS

ARCHITECTURE | Get to know a little more about the architecture of the city at an evening lecture focusing on the iconic Vancouver Special that popped up so prolifically across the city in the 1960s. Local architect Stephanie Robb will be at Vancouver Special (the store) on Main Street this Thursday night to discuss the work that she has done in refreshing, updating and transforming a number of these homes in the city. There are no tickets, so just come by. Bonus: snacks and a cash bar
Thurs, March 27 | 6-9 pm | Vancouver Special (3612 Main St) | Free | DETAILS

IMAGINE | Vancouver’s distinct character and urban aesthetic emerged from a series of urban planning policies and decisions that have been made over the years. This Thursday night the Museum of Vancouver, together with Vancouver Urban Sketchers, will take a look at unrealized urban development projects that might have changed the way we see ourselves as a city today. From The Museum of Vancouver:”Vancouver has been shaped by multiple decisions about what we chose to do and not to do. The built environment surrounding us provides clues about the nature of these debates, but it doesn’t tell us the full story. Vancouver Imagined: The Way We Weren’t, guest curated by Jason Vanderhill of Illustrated Vancouver, showcases the work of architectural illustrators and model makers in the context of unrealized urban development projects, and provides a unique way to understand the city. Had these projects been given full assent, Vancouver would look dramatically different than it does today.” You don’t need to be a skilled sketch artist to participate in this event. You just have to be curious. Paper, pens, and pencils will be provided but you are encouraged to bring your favourite sketchbook and preferred drawing implements.
Thurs, March 27 | 6-8pm | By donation | Museum of Vancouver 1100 Chestnut St | DETAILS

FILM | Finding Vivian Maier is playing at the the Vancity Theatre. The story of this exceedingly talented American street photographer is a fascinating one. A nanny for a series of well-to-do families, Maier was the sort of woman who would have been described as introverted and plain. When she died in 2009 those who knew her would never had suspected that the contents of the storage locker that she left behind would soon elevate this solitary and unassuming woman to topic books and films and international gallery exhibitions, but that is what happened. An amateur historian purchased the contents of Maiers locker in a thrift auction to discover in excess of 100,000 photographs (many of them on undeveloped rolls of film) that he immediately saw as significant. Any personality, depth or poignancy that wasn’t evident in the way that the woman presented herself to the world is clearly visible in the photographs that she took. Her images (predominantly in Chicago and New York during the 1950s and 1960s) convey a strong and clear sense of time, place and feeling that have compelled critics to compare her to the likes of world renowned artists such as Diane Arbus, Weegee, Robert Frank and Henri Cartier-Bresson. Finding Vivian Maier pieces together the life and works of this mysterious woman and offers a posthumous guess at the motivations and vision that inspired her.
March 28 – April 09 | Various Times | Vancity Theatre (1181 Seymour St) | $11 DETAILS

SIEZE THE NIGHT | Carpe Noctem is a group exhibition featuring the artwork of 20 talented illustrators. Head to The Fall Gallery on Seymour Street Friday night to catch opening night and enjoy a line-up of diverse works that range from pencil and pen to animation and computer generate images from student artists currently enrolled in Emily Carr’s Illustration Gallery Practices class of 2014.
Fri, March 28 | 7pm | The Fall Gallery (644 Seymour St) | DETAILS

LIPSERVICE | There’s a Jimmy Fallon-style lip-sync battle happening at The Imperial this Saturday night that should be worth a few laughs. Lipservice organisers have wrangled a line-up of brave locals to hit the stage with 30-60 second lip sync performances and have asked Vancouver comedy team The Sunday Service to MC the insanity. Funds raised will be donated to imagine1day (a local charity that supports development in Ethiopia).
Sat, March 29 | 8pm | The Imperial 319 Main Street | $20 | DETAILS

THINK | The Vancouver Institute presents an evening lecture about the sustainability of oceans on Saturday night. Professor Rashid Sumaila is the Director & Professor, Fisheries Economics Research Unit at the UBC Fisheries Centre and he’ll be speaking about global issues such as “fisheries subsidies, illegal fishing and the economics of high and deep seas fisheries”. This is the last Vancouver Institute lecture of the Spring 2014 season. Get in on it.
Sat, March 29 | 8:15pm | Lecture Hall 2 | Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, UBC | DETAILS

EAT LOCAL | The Winter Farmers Market fills the Nat Bailey Stadium parking lot on Saturday. Stinging nettles are just coming in to season and there are usually some kicking around the market. Full of iron and tasting like spring, pick them up and feast upon them while you can. Also hook yourself up with hearty root vegetables, fresh bread, dried fruits and scores of other locally-grown goodies.
Sat, March 29| 10am – 2pm | East Parking Lot of Nat Bailey Stadium 4601 Ontario St | DETAILS

BLIMMERY | It’s time for Blim’s Spring Community Market. There will be clothing, accessories, vintage trinkets, pottery and hand made jewellery as well as live music, gourmet chocolates and the occasional cupcake, so hook yourself up!
Sun, March 30 | 12-6 pm | Heritage Hall (3102 Main) | Free | DETAILS 

EXILE | A new plant forward, ethical, wild, and indigenous eatery called Exile is set to open in the West End on Thursday. Read the full story in Scout’s photo essay here.
Thurs, March 26th | 1220 Bute Street | DETAILS

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s shops and streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy, and uncooperative camera.

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VANCOUVERITES | On Anthropomorphism & The Vague Dreams Of Ola Volo’s Childhood

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by Grady Mitchell | You may not have realized it at the time, but you’ve probably seen an Ola Volo piece before. A stroll through any Vancouver neighbourhood is liable to uncover one of the dozens of walls and buildings, both large and small, that bear the local illustrator’s work. Aside from public spaces, she’s created commissions for Hootsuite, Lululemon, Save On Meats, The Fox Cabaret and numerous companies and publications in Vancouver and beyond. Take a quick look through her portfolio and it’s obvious why.

Ola combines a whimsical fascination with childhood fantasy with the distinct artistic style of her Eastern European heritage, using intricate patterns to tell folky day-dream stories. In addition to her commissions, she is forever scribbling away at personal projects. We pulled her away from the paper and pen to ask a few questions.

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I know your heritage has significantly influenced your work. Can you tell me about that style of art, and how it’s affected your work? Multiculturalism has been a very inspirational concept for my work. I come from a diverse Eastern European and Asian background that was complicated by historic transitions during my childhood. My origin, my move to BC, and my subsequent immersion in its own variety of cultures, has undeniably become the main focus of my art. My illustrations merge aspects of history, people, animals and traditions through patterns. I use specific patterns to form specific narratives. Learning about patterns and the ways they are used to embellish and define a culture has been very interesting to me. Thus the mixing of the right kind of pattern is integral to my art, and the intentionality of patterns gives me a lot to play with.

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A lot of your work calls back to childhood fantasy. What about that phase of life intrigues you? Great question. When I was growing up, Kazakhstan’s landscape and culture were completely different than they are now. That time of my life seems like a vague dream, as childhood seems for most adults but even more so because of the unrecognizability of the sites of my childhood now. Tapping into those childhood memories, and further exploring stories and characters that shaped my childhood world is a nostalgic act, perhaps. It may sound a bit saddening but its always a fun day at the studio!

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Storytelling is another major part of your images. Why is that important to you? How do you incorporate stories into a piece? I believe that a visual narrative is a great way to connect with people especially in multi-lingual cities. I attempt to communicate through anthropomorphism. Through animal characters I’m able to mimic different types of personalities and emotions without excluding too many people, and tell stories that hopefully can be interpreted in different ways.

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Any upcoming projects you want people to know about? Lot’s of interesting projects lined up for this year, you can follow me on Instagram and keep up to date with my future projects!

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FIELD TRIP #603 | A Not-So-Arduous Bike Adventure That Ends With BBQ And Tacos

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by Rebecca Slaven | Central Valley Greenway is the perfect ride to the start of cycling season. It’s the most approachable of the long-distance rides, with a flat route that goes all the way to New Westminster. The myriad of construction sites, all of which have their own individual charms, eventually turn into picturesque park scenery.

The route starts on the seawall by Science World but I like to join it at 10th and Victoria to avoid the wicked hill on Great Northern Way. Signage is good throughout. I find the only area of confusion is at Gilmore street but I think that’s because I always get distracted by the giant Dick’s Lumber sign and miss the CVG directional sign.

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If riding in the Willingdon area at night in the spring, beware the intense murders of crows. They’re generally harmless but will provoke a series of involuntary shudders long after you’ve ridden past.

Stops & Eats | Burnaby Lake Regional Nature Park is a gorgeous wildlife sanctuary known for bird watching and clamours of hungry ducks. It’s illegal to feed birds in Burnaby but I highly doubt that this is enforced, especially when the majority of by-law-breakers are adorable children. Those with a fear of geese may want to keep riding past.

If feeling hungry in New Westminster, pop by Re-Up BBQ for some pulled pork and sweet tea. You can either eat in the cafeteria set-up or find a sunny bench on the Quay Boardwalk.

If you’d rather hold out until the end of your ride, take a meal break at Bandidas on The Drive, which has my favourite breakfast in the city (specifically, The Breakfast). The vegetarian Mexican-inspired fare is the ideal balance of substance and health after a long bike ride. Not counting the margarita you should pair it with.

MORE FIELD TRIPS

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Bio-PicRebecca Slaven is a librarian, writer, and cyclist. Her subject specialities include law, beauty, and croquet. Her format specialty is the how-to guide. She mostly rides her bike to work but has cycled as far as San Francisco. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter.

GOODS | The Acorn Artist Series Gets Set To Profile Ryan Mathieson On March 21st

March 19, 2014 

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The Acorn is located at 3995 Main Street in beautiful Vancouver, BC | 604-566-9001 | www.theacornrestaurant.ca

The GOODS from The Acorn

Vancouver, BC | The Acorn Artist Series shines a light on artists in Vancouver whose work we admire greatly and wish to proliferate in our own humble way. Each month we make a new artist postcard that gets handed out to our guests who are free to frame it, mail it, or fold it into an airplane and surprise their neighbour. This month, we’re featuring Ryan Mathieson, an emerging artist who lives and works in Vancouver, BC. He has exhibited at the Western Front, the Audain Gallery, East Van Studios and Pith Gallery in Calgary, AB. The launch of Mathieson’s postcard goes down with music from DJ Patrick Campbell at The Acorn on Friday, March 21 from 10pm – 2am. Read a quick Q&A with the artist after the jump… Read more

SCOUT LIST: 10 Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now & Next Week

March 18, 2014 

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

CRAFT NIGHT | Part store, part workshop, Collage Collage in the Fraserhood encourages imagination and creativity and arms you with the glue stick to pull it all together. This week they’re holding an Easter-themed grown-up craft night. The shop’s resident craft experts have combed through Pinterest to develop a fantastic line-up of artsy creations that will blow the typical Easter Bunny stuff out of the water. Don’t resort to cheap, store-bought trinkets. Grab a friend and get crafty! Register online.
Tues, March 18 | 7-9pm | Collage Collage (621 Kingsway @ 15th + Fraser) | $30 | DETAILS

BACH | American baroque specialist Tanya Tomkins is playing the complete cello suites of J.S. Bach at the Orpheum this week and it’s going to be pretty amazing. Tuesday evening’s show is already sold out but there are still tickets available for Wednesday night when Tomkins will play Suites 2, 3 & 6. This concert is presented by Music on Main and Early Music Vancouver – two local organizations with a passion for good classical music. Get in on the action here.
Wed, March 19 | Bar opens 7pm | Concert 8pm | Orpheum Annex (823 Seymour) | DETAILS

ART | Presentation House Gallery is having an opening reception for a new Stan Douglas show this Thursday night. Stan Douglas: Synthetic Pictures will feature new works that include large format photographs (of the sort Douglas is famous for) as well as a series of abstract imagery (Corrupt Files) that are “…photographic scans extracted from Douglas’ film works, reduced to patterns of data.” The big draw will be a massive panorama that reconstructs postwar Hogan’s Alley in Vancouver’s Strathcona neighbourhood. “The digitally reconstructed scene, rendered with intricate historical accuracy, is translated into a black and white photograph, and thus confuses distinctions between artifice and realism.” Hogan’s Alley was an ethnically diverse area with a strong black community in postwar Vancouver that was destroyed in the ’70′s in order to make way for the construction of the Georgia Viaduct. Douglas reconstructs a sense of time and place with his work, giving us a detailed look in to Vancouver of the past. Stan Douglas: Synthetic Pictures continues to May 25th.
Thurs, March 20 | 7pm | Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield, N Van | Free | DETAILS

PECHA KUCHA | Pecha Kucha Night goes down this week. As per usual, the gathering of local creatives will be presenting 20 images for 20 seconds each on what inspires/drive/tickles them. This month’s line-up includes Malcolm Levy (New Forms Festival), Grant Lawrence (author and CBC Radio personality), Nikolas Badminton (DesignCulutreMind), Erin Ireland (To Die For Banana Bread), and several others. It’s always inspiring, and it has a habit of selling out, so don’t wait on it! Scoop tickets while there are still some available.
Thurs March 20 | Doors 6:30 | Vogue Theatre (918 Granville) | $15 | DETAILS

GROW | The Society Promoting Environmental Conservation is holding a gardening workshop this week that will focus on increasing the food producing capacity of your home garden. Participants will learn about everything from smart garden design (including factors to consider when making your site selection and planning garden layout) to yield estimates, methods for calculating seed needs and how much space you’ll need to establish between rows. This is a hands-on planning workshop, so it’s a good idea to come with the approximate dimensions of your garden area as well as an understanding of your household’s weekly veggie consumption. Spring is here, folks. Get planting!
Thurs, March 20 | 6-9pm | SPEC 2060 Pine St. | $49 | DETAILS

LAUGH | Order a grilled cheese sandwich and a beer from the concession and settle in for a movie at the Rio this Friday night. The ‘Midnight Movie’ is Monty Python & the Holy Grail. Brilliant dialogue and side-splitting humour abound. “I don’t want to talk to you no more, you empty headed animal food trough wiper. I fart in your general direction. Your mother was a hamster and your father smelt of elderberries.” If you’re feeling inspired, dress up in a film-related (read: grab some coconuts) costume and take $2 off of the admission price.
Fri, March 21 | 11:30pm | Rio Theatre (1660 E Broadway) | $8/$6 | DETAILS

SAUSAGE PARTY | Rain City Chronicles has joined forces with Bestie (hooray for sausages!) to present a German-themed storytelling evening that is at the top of our list of things to do this week. Das Lexikon is a fun-filled night of German themed storytelling (inspired by German vocabulary handpicked by Rain City Chronicles)  German beer and a delicious bratwurst dinner by Bestie (vegetarian options also available). And what better place to have it unfold than the Vancouver Alpen Club, an institution with a century’s worth of local German history. Rain City Chronicles believes that everyone has a great personal story to tell and they make it their business to create opportunities for our communities to share them. So get into it! This is going to be priceless stuff. Get sorted with tickets here.
Sat, March 22 | Doors 6:30pm | Vancouver Alpen Club (4875 Victoria Dr.) | $38 | DETAILS

NIGHT FOREST | Shadows, noises, animal calls and the sound of snapping branches – walking through Pacific Spirit Regional Park at night can be an intimidating prospect! It’s best to do it in a group. Follow a guide and add more than a few cheerful lanterns and all of a sudden you have a pretty magical Saturday night. That opportunity presents itself this weekend when The Pacific Spirit Regional Park Society hosts Night Quest. It’s a gentle 2km walk along a lantern-lit trail; an outdoor evening of storytelling, campfire music and a bit of wildlife education. Wear your gumboots, pack a flashlight and bring a travel mug as well as a pocket full of change to use at the pop-up Girl Guide concession. This is a really great event appropriate for anyone interested in the mystery of the forest at night (geared toward kids but highly recommended!).
Sat, Mar. 22 | 7-10pm | Pacific Spirit Regional Park, 16th Ave Park Entrance | DETAILS

BUY LOCAL | The Winter Farmers Market fills the Nat Bailey Stadium parking lot on Saturday. Stinging nettles are just coming in to season and there are usually some kicking around the market. Full of iron and tasting like spring, pick them up and feast upon them while you can. Also hook yourself up with hearty root vegetables, fresh bread, dried fruits and scores of other locally-grown goodies.
Sat, Mar. 22 | 10am – 2pm | East Parking Lot of Nat Bailey Stadium 4601 Ontario St | DETAILS

FRESH AIR | A wander around Stanley Park is always inspiring. This Sunday, hit it with a purpose by taking part in a naturalist-led walking tour and learn a little more about the life of the plants and animals of the park as you go. The Stanley Park Ecology Centre will guide you through trails and hidden pockets of the forest to explore the variety of ways in which plants and animals use dead or dying trees to support rich worlds of forest life. This relaxed walking tour meets at the Stanley Park Nature House (located on the south-east shore of Lost Lagoon – just below the viewing plaza at the north end of Alberni Street) and will cost $10.
Sunday, March 23 | 1:30pm – 3:30pm | Stanley Park Nature House | $10 | DETAILS  

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s shops and streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy, and uncooperative camera.

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SEEN IN VANCOUVER #489 | Inside “Post Projects”, The Design Firm At Ontario & 3rd

March 17, 2014 

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by Grady Mitchell | Alex Nelson and Beau House are Post Projects, a graphic design house with a sun-filled studio at Ontario and 3rd. They’ve crafted the look and feel of some of Vancouver’s most beloved companies, including Brassneck Brewery, Revolver Coffee, Bambudda, and the Western Front artist centre.

The two met in Emily Carr’s design program and graduated in 2008. After a few years of working for other design firms and taking on freelance projects, they hit a crossroads: either leave Vancouver to search for work, or start their own company. Rather than contribute to the city’s brain drain, which has seen many talented designers relocate to hubs like New York, London, and Berlin, they chose to stick around, launching Post Projects in 2010.

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Since then their sleek and contemporary aesthetic has attracted both local and international clients. Care, time and detail are the central tenets of their design philosophy. Post handles any visual aspect that a company needs: visual identity and branding, web and app design, print and publication, signage, interactive media, illustration, photography, packaging, and more. While they’re very much of Vancouver, they’re also mindful of the global design discourse, and incorporate those influences into their work. Take a look inside…

EVERYTHING SEEN IN VANCOUVER

SEEN IN VANCOUVER #488 | Fishing Net Art Installation Rises At The Convention Centre

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We spied Boston-based artist Janet Echelman’s new work, Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks, going up high yesterday in the air between the Vancouver Convention Centre and the Fairmont Hotel. The 745ft wide partially crowd-funded and interactive piece was inspired by fishing nets. “Using physical gestures, visitors will be able to choreograph the lighting in real time via their mobile devices.” It officially launches this Saturday and will be on display until March 23rd before travelling to other cities.

“The sculpture is an extension of the idea Echelman presented in her [TED] talk, “Taking imagination seriously.” In the talk, Echelman shares how she fell in love with a new material — fishing net — and began creating voluptuous forms that contrast with the hard edges generally found in cities. She revealed the challenge of making these sculptures both durable and permanent, but also able to react to the wind. She shared her dream of taking these sculptures to the next level by finding materials light enough to attach to existing buildings in a neighborhood rather than requiring a new supporting steel structure.”

EVERYTHING SEEN IN VANCOUVER

DIG IT | On Groceries & Police Shootouts At The Finch’s Market Location In Strathcona

March 11, 2014 

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by Stevie Wilson | As one of Vancouver’s most unique neighbourhoods, Strathcona has plenty more to offer than just a grouping of heritage homes. The “East End”, as the area was originally called, was one the first residential settlements in the city and, unlike many other communities, it never developed its own commercial sector, preferring instead of rely on a handful of locally-owned convenience and bodega-type stores.

A great example of Strathcona’s continued romance with small markets is the street-level corner of the Jackson Apartments at 501 East Georgia. Built in 1910, the Italianate-style apartment building was designed by E.E. Blackmore, the same man behind the storied Pantages Theatre on East Hastings.

Georgia Street, which was then known as Harris Street, had been poised to be a direct streetcar route to downtown via the original Georgia Viaduct, but when those plans fell through (because the viaduct couldn’t support trams), the neighbourhood still had the BC Electric line, which not only guaranteed its popularity as a residential spot but also gave it enough commercial viability to attract some trade.

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The first recorded main-floor business at the Jackson Apartments was the Costalas Costa Grocery in 1911. It began the address’ unbroken “market” tradition that continues to this day (though Finch’s Market specializes in coffees and sandwiches, it also functions as a neighbourhood grocery, selling everything from apples and dairy products to preserves and pasta).

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It was here on this corner in 1917 that police chief Malcolm MacLennan famously met his end. He and an 8 year old bystander were shot and killed by a local man named Bob Tait in a shootout with the VPD. There is a mosaic memorial to the fallen chief set into the sidewalk just outside the front door.

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In the 1970s, when the streetcar rails were removed, it was known to the community as Fung’s Grocery. More recently, locals will recall it as the infamous U-Go-2-Store, which featured a variety of smokes, pops, Mr. Noodles, No Name bags ‘o chips, and a few candies that cost just a nickel apiece.

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Today, the address operates as Finch’s Market, whose owners, Jamie Smith and Sheryl Matthews, gutted the space and built from the ground up to reveal and maintain much of the space’s historic charms, including the original brick walls, large fenestration, radiator, and corner entrance to match the oriel windows (see above). Scout Editor Andrew Morrison lives close by and took plenty of pictures during the construction process, so be sure to also take a close look at the gallery below. You can really see just how big of a transformation it was. Oh, and pop inside sometime for a quiet lunchtime retreat (they do some seriously great sandwiches) with a little local history on the side.

MORE VANCOUVER HISTORY

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Stevie Wilson is a historian masquerading as a writer. After serving as an editor for the UBC History Journal, she branched out with a cryptic agenda: to encourage the people of Vancouver to take notice of their local history and heritage with Scout columns that aim to reveal to readers the many fascinating things that they might walk past every day without noticing.

SCOUT LIST: 10 Things That You Should Absolutely Do Between Now & Next Week

March 11, 2014 

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by Michelle Sproule | The main objective of this website is to scout out and promote the things that make Vancouver such a sweet place to be. We do this with an emphasis on the city’s independent spirit to foster a sense of connectedness within and between our communities, and to introduce our readers to the people who grow and cook our food, play the raddest tunes in our better venues, create our most interesting art, and design everything from what we wear to the spaces we inhabit. The Scout List is our carefully considered, first rate agenda of super awesome things that we’re either doing, wishing that we could do, or conspiring to do this week. You can also check it out in the Globe & Mail, from our calendar to theirs…and yours!

FERMENTATION | Vancouver’s R&B Brewing and the crew at The Bottleneck on Granville Street (right below The Commodore Ballroom) are joining forces to host Beer Feast this Tuesday nigh, which will see Todd Graham of R&B pair a selection of beer with a four course dinner prepared by Bottleneck chef Hugh Carbery. The theme of the evening will be ‘fermented’, so think pickled, smoked and cured meats, cheeses and pickled veggies and – of course – beer. Not bad for a Tuesday night!
Tue, March 11 | Doors 7pm/Dinner 8pm | The Bottleneck (870 Granville) | $60 | DETAILS

WINNOW WEDNESDAY | Gastown’s East Van Roasters make their chocolate from scratch. And when they say “from scratch,” they really mean it. The tiny shop imports, roasts, winnows (removes the papery shell surrounding the bean), and grinds 22kgs of cacao beans for every batch of their house-made chocolates. It’s an involved process and downtown eastside social enterprise relies on the hands many employees and volunteers to get the job done (particularly when it comes to removing the shells from the freshly roasted cocao beans). This Wednesday night you can pull up a chair and learn about chocolate making while you help to winnow. Those willing to donate their time and energy to the noble cause of hand-processing chocolate will be given a cup of tea or house-roasted coffee as well as salty chocolate chip cookies and EVR brownies to snack on. Hang around until the end and you can take some cacao shells home to make tea with.
Wed, March 12 | 6:30-8:30pm | East Van Roasters (319 Carrall) | Free | DETAILS

EXPLORE | Standing proudly at the north end of Burrard Street, Vancouver’s Marine Building, which opened in 1930, is certainly one of the most iconic and stunningly beautiful heritage buildings in the city. If the doorway is any indication of the level of craftsmanship and style of the offices inside, just imagine how impressive it must be to set foot in the art deco-styled penthouse! Next week you will have an opportunity to do just that. On the night of Wednesday, March 12th, the Heritage Vancouver Society will lead an informative tour of the building’s jaw-dropping lobby and gorgeous penthouse. Tickets aren’t cheap, but this will be money well spent, particularly because your 100 beans counts as a donation to the Heritage Vancouver Society (tax receipts will be issued) and there will be a reception that includes wine and hors d’oeuvres.
Wed, March 12 | 5:30-8pm | Marine Building (355 Burrard) | $100 | DETAILS

FILM | The Pacific Cinematheque is running a series of classics that have been meticulously restored by the UCLA Film and Television Archives. In the age of digital, well, everything – the opportunity to watch a film in it’s original 35mm format has become increasingly rare. Don’t miss out on experiencing this medium the way it was intended: 35mm film projected on to a big screen with a bag of popcorn in your lap. Restored films include everything from film noir and comedy to silent films, thrillers and documentaries). This Thursday you can catch Cary Grant in The Thirty Day Princess (6:30pm) and W.C. Fields in International House (8pm). The UCLA Festival of Preservation screenings continue with more shows (Robert Frost: A Lover’s Quarrel with the World on March 20 and Mantrap on March 26).
Thu, March 13 | Various times | Pacific Cinematheque (1131 Howe St) | DETAILS

EVIDENCE | There’s a show on at The Robert Lynds Gallery that I’m interested in checking out. Site[d] is a mixed media series by artist JG Mair that documents details of East Vancouver ‘sites’ by taking them out of their physical context and presenting them in stand alone vignettes, a process that lends the work a somewhat archival feel. The idea (as the artist explains) is that these details “provide a lingering glimpse of the transitory state of the urban fabric. Each work suspends time and space revealing a landscape trapped between decay and growth.” Beyond the larger issues of such as land-development and displacement the collection conveys the depth, history and personality of place. Site[d], the works of JG Mair, has been curated by Michael Bjornson and continues until mid-April.
Now through April 12 | 1639 West 3rd Ave | Free | DETAILS

SCRATCH | Scratchboard is the process of creating drawings and illustrations by using a sharp tool to remove layers of dark clay or ink to reveal a light lower level. Think of it this way: remember when you scribbled a mess of coloured crayon on paper and then covered all of the colour with back crayon so that you could use your fingernails to remove the top layer of wax to create stunning works of kindergarten art? Well, scratchboard works on the same principle but it’s much more refined with results that can look like highly detailed (think beautifully precise linocuts and etchings). This is really the kind of thing you need to see rather than read about, so head to the Hot Art Wet City gallery on Main Street this Friday night to catch the opening of Scratch, a show of new scratchboard artwork by local artist Andrea Hooge. Then you’ll understand. Bonus: Brassneck is only a few doors down and it’s almost always a guarantee that there will be a cool food truck parked outside. To recap, that’s art opening, craft beer and cheap good food. Sounds like a fine Friday night on Main Street.
Fri, March 14| 7pm | Hot Art Wet City (2206 Main St) | DETAILS

LAUNCH | Sad Mag is a cool local magazine that celebrates independent art and culture in Vancouver. It’s issued on a quarterly basis and contains some seriously compelling pages packed with images (film or Polaroid, nothing dig­i­tally manip­u­lated). This Saturday night they’re hosting the launch party for their latest issue (no. 15) Grit & Gristle. This issue will “explore eat­ing and drink­ing in Van­cou­ver, Sad Mag style. We’re inter­ested in the Dive bar, the hole in the wall eatery and new and inno­va­tion foodie things hap­pen­ing in the city: GRIT + GRISTLE. It’s kinda dirty, gritty, but won’t give you food poi­son­ing, we promise. We want to get between your teeth. Chew the fat about Vancouver’s new, strange or fas­ci­nat­ing culi­nary caveats.” Sounds pretty bang on to us! The opening party will include original artwork and photography from the artists who contributed to the magazine.
Sat, March 15 | 7-10pm | Make Studios (257 E. 7th Ave) | Free | DETAILS 

EXPLORE | At the Dr. Sun Yat Sen gardens this month, anthropologist and photographer Evelyn Nodwell is showing a selection of photographs taken during her travels to the villages and small towns of Guizhou Province in China. This Saturday presents a fantastic opportunity to check out Nodwell’s photos because not only will the artist be in attendance, but she will also be joined by National Geographic photographer Sam Abell. The two will have a walking conversation of her works as they are displayed in the Garden’s gallery. Sam Abell has a forty-year photographic career under his belt, including having one of his images (have a look) named one of the 50 greatest pictures ever made at National Geographic. He’s also a bit of an expert on gardens so this is likely to be an interesting event.
Sat, March 15 | 2pm – 4pm | Dr. Sun Yat Sen Gardens | Chinatown | DETAILS

WINTER FARMERS MARKET | Stay strong, take your vitamins, and eat well by loading the fridge with fresh, local food. Shoot over to 30th and Ontario to get your fill of fruits and veggies. Look for kale, crispy apples, leeks, beets, potatoes and squash, as well as goodies like baked goods, preserves and local honey. Yay farmers!
Sat, March 15 | 10am – 2pm | East Parking Lot Nat Bailey Stadium | DETAILS

CULTURE | Opera Pro Cantanti is performing Bellini’s I Capuleti e i Montecchi Sunday night. From Opera Pro Cantanti: “While families at war swear eternal hatred, two young hearts are inextricably bound in love. The result is tragedy at its most poignant. With soaring melodies, glorious harmonies and a timeless theme, I Capuleti e i Montecchi is one of Bellini’s true masterpieces.” The setting of the Cambrian Hall makes this community scale performance intimate and thoroughly enjoyable. Plus Don’t Argue Pizza is just down the block for post performance pizza and beer.
Sun, March 16 | 7pm | Cambrian Hall (215 E 17@ Main) | $18 (not including pizza) | DETAILS  

Check the Globe & Mail every Thursday for our Special Weekend Edition of the Scout List

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late-may-2009-169Michelle Sproule grew up in Kitsilano and attended University in Australia and the University of Victoria before receiving her graduate degree in Library Sciences from The University of Toronto. She lives in beautiful Strathcona and enjoys wandering aimlessly through the city’s shops and streets with her best friend – a beat up, sticky, grimy, and uncooperative camera.

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