SEEN IN VANCOUVER #508 | Cunningham Vs Sylla; Previewing The Restaurant Rumble

The third episode of the Aprons For Gloves’ Restaurant Rumble preview series just landed on our desk. It sets up the Middleweight Title showdown between Max Cunnigham (Partner, Joe’s Apartment) and Yacine Sylla (Bartender, Chambar). The fights take place in Gastown on July 23rd. Click here for details and to score tickets to the Livestream parties.

EVERYTHING SEEN IN VANCOUVER

SMOKE BREAK #1119 | Short Film About Bill, Who Delivers Pizza On By Fixie In Brooklyn

(via) “Bill’s fifty-two years old, has a mountain man beard, and delivers pizza on a fixie in Brooklyn. Over the course of several shifts, DELIVERY unveils an intriguing man rushing food to your door while it’s still hot and fresh.”

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DIG IT | Peeling Back The Woody Layers Of The Legendary “Railway Club” On Dunsmuir

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by Stevie Wilson | It is recognized as one of Vancouver’s most popular music venues and the longest continuously occupied space of its kind, but there’s much more to the Railway Club at 579 Dunsmuir than the occasional anecdote about The Tragically Hip. With over 80 years of history behind it, the space is yet another product of the inextricable link between Vancouver and its busy rail lines. The club, established in 1932 (at midnight on New Year’s Eve, to be exact) was originally a members-only space for the CPR’s staff to unwind, and was allegedly opened in response to the exclusivity of the nearby Engineers Club. Following the repeal of prohibition in 1933, The Railwaymen’s Club (as it was then known) operated as a busy, beer-stained and smoke-filled poker bar for the city’s thirsty working class.

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The slim Laursen Building (also registered as Lawsen) dates back to around 1926, and has since featured many small businesses both upstairs and down. Prior to the Railwaymen’s Club, the top floor belonged to the European Concert Cafe, where one can only imagine what sort of fun was had. Over the years the space fell into significant disrepair until the Forsyth family purchased the bar in 1981. None of the contemporary furnishings are original, save for the fenestration and radiators; everything had to be constructed for a new crowd of patrons. Behind the main bar a set of beautiful stained glass windows are nearly hidden by a wide variety of signs and stuff to stare at over a pint.

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Another surprising element of the Railway is its cozy back-end bar. While it blends seamlessly with the dark wooden decor of the front space, this room used to be the H. Miles Jewellery Store, which the Forsyths took over in 1988. The beautiful oak back bar was purchased from the storied West End gay bar Buddy’s when it closed its doors in the same year.

So whether it’s for a drink, a show, or to watch its charming toy trains circle the ceiling, just soaking up an hour at this local landmark means soaking up some uniquely local history, too. Indeed, in a city where restaurant and bar interiors seldom last as long as they really should, it’s an uncommon environment worthy of your thirsty investigation. Photos after the jump… Read more

HEADS UP | Wine, Music, & Picnic Dinners Make For Enchanted Evenings In Chinatown

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The Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden began it’s Enchanted Evenings summer concert series last Friday with an al fresco performance by Chinese-Western musical fusion ensemble Silk Road Music. Scout contributor Luis Valdizon attended and took the shots above and below. They’ve really shaken things up this year with reservable seats, gourmet picnic dinners (order in advance for $10-$29), plus wine and beer. There are four more Enchanted Evenings concerts this summer and each will have a unique feel and tempo. It’s Tomoe Arts on July 17th, Jim Byrnes on July 24th, the Vancouver Piano Ensemble on Jul 31st, and Deanna Knight and the Hot Club of Mars on August 7th. The shows cost $25 each. Doors open at 7pm for each concert at 578 Carrall St. Read more

HONOUR BOUND | “Restaurant Rumble” To Be Screened Live At Parties Across The City

Are you excited for the Aprons For Gloves’ Restaurant Rumble on July 23rd? So the hell are we. Even though it’s now sold out, you can still catch all the action with your friends in Gastown (Portside), Chinatown (Fortune Sound Club), or on the Granville strip (The Bottleneck). Yup, all three venues are throwing special Livestream viewing parties and they’re going to be awesome. Click on the links above for tickets and details. Bonus: watch the new Restaurant Rumble preview video!

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Honour Bound details the many cool things that we feel honour bound to check out because they either represent our city extremely well or are inherently awesome in one way or another.

HEADS UP | 1980s Classic “Pretty In Pink” Screening Outdoors In Stanley Park Tonight

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It’s time to grab yourself a picnic basket and claim a spot on the grass with your best blanket because tonight is outdoor movie night in Stanley Park’s Ceperley Meadow (at 2nd Beach). They’re showing the 1980′s teen-angst classic, Pretty In Pink, at dusk for the win. Anticipate a big crowd, folks.

As you can see from the shot at the top (taken last Tuesday by our friends at Fresh Air Cinema) a ton of people show up to these gigs and there’s definitely some wandering overflow from the Second Beach drum circle just down the way. So be extra smart about it and take public transit, some extra patience, and suitable provisions so you can make it through at ease. An outdoor movie of this calibre in this beautiful weather? Yes, please! Bonus: Ducky’s unforgettable Otis Redding impression.

SEEN IN VANCOUVER #505 | Scenes From The ‘Khatsahlano Street Party’ On West 4th

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photos by Luis Valdizon | The sweltering Khatsahlano Street Party went down over the weekend along West 4th Avenue in Kitsilano with dozens of food trucks, 50 bands, 100+ participating merchants and vendors, and over 100,000 attendees. Shots after the jump… Read more

GOODS | Music Direction’s July Playlist For Prohibition Brewing Co.’s New Tasting Room

Scout Series ~ Prohibition Brewing ~ from Music Direction on 8tracks Radio.

The GOODS from Music Direction

Vancouver, BC | Music Direction’s playlist for July highlights Kelowna-based Prohibition Brewing Company. The folks from Prohibition recently opened a beautiful Tasting Room on Hamilton Street in Yaletown. Bringing you back to a time when ordering a beer was worth the risk. They commissioned Vancouver artist Rory Doyle to hand-render all their beer labels and logos. Their music program will make you want to get comfy, stay a while and share a beer with the likes of Jack White, Afie Jurvanen and The Rolling Stones. Full tracklist after the jump… Read more

SMOKE BREAK #1118 | What It’s Like When Your Wifi Connection Is Lost For 2 Minutes

Julian Smith taps into your anxiety whenever the wifi cuts out. The Awesomer nails it: “We’d call it a lazy sketch, but that wordless retreat when the Internet comes back on is depressingly accurate…”

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SOUNDTRACKING | New Foursome ‘Frankie’ Dials In Their Sound, Gets Set For Festivals

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by Grady Mitchell | Vancouver quartet Frankie, comprised of singer/guitarist Francesca Carbonneau, keyboardist Nashlyn Lloyd, bassist Samantha Lankester, and drummer Zoe Fuhr, have pioneered their own new genre based on their distinctive style of dark, folky music. They’re calling it “twinkle rock”.

That’s not to say everything in the Frankie universe sparkles. The delicate beauty of Francesca’s voice and the intricately woven instruments masks the dark core of their music. “It’s kind of like when a dream interferes with a nightmare, and all of that happens in one song,” says Zoe. The collision between those two extremes – the immense possibility of dreams with the nocturnal tortures of nightmares – is where twinkle rock happens.

In various ways, almost every Frankie song embodies this. Powder, despite its light and airy instrumentation, lays out an emotional spiral and some none-too-healthy methods of coping. The frantic pace of Someone Once mimics the story of mental decay it spins, just as the steady, forbidding rhythm of Painted Birds amplifies a tale of romance gone dark.

Formed in December 2013, the band has faced most of the challenges arrayed against a new act, compounded by the stereotypes facing an all-girl group. “You have something to prove,” the band agrees. Most common is the genuine, post-performance surprise that audience members show at their live shows. But those kinds of reactions just motivate them to work harder. “We can’t just be cute up there,” says Nashlyn. “We have to be good.”

The momentum they’ve built over only six months is a testament to that, and shows no signs of slowing. On Saturday, July 26th the band will play a show at Sitka on West 4th. They have two festivals scheduled later in the summer: Edge of the World on Haida Gwaii on August 9th, and another at Ponderosa Festival at the end of that month. After that, they plan to hole up for the Fall and get an album done. For more from Frankie, check out their website.

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DEFINITIVE RECORDS | The 3 Albums That Anchor The Tastes Of Super Vancouverites

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Definitive Records asks interesting Vancouverites to pick the three albums that anchor their musical tastes. Today we hear from Theo Lloyd Kohls, owner of The Dunlevy Snackbar, which is open Tuesday through Saturday evenings on the DTES for all your snacking/sipping needs.

Pulp – Common People | LISTEN | “In middle school, JC [lead singer Jarvis Cocker] was my JC.”

Serge Gainsbourg – Initials BB | LISTEN | “I was 18, she was 24, EYES WIDE OPEN.”

Gil Scott Heron – Winter In America | LISTEN | “A Father, a Sage, an Artist. Bless your soul.”

ALL DEFINITIVE RECORDS

SOUNDTRACKING | “Shimmering Stars” To Tease New Album At The Electric Owl Aug. 2

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by Grady Mitchell | On August 2nd at The Electric Owl, Vancouver quartet Shimmering Stars will offer a sneak peek of their second album, Bedrooms of the Nation, coming out August 13. Compared to their first record, Violent Hearts, Bedrooms is a vast, howling sound. Guitars are stacked atop each other – sometimes fifty tracks on a single song, says guitarist and singer Rory McClure – to build a swirling hurricane noise. This change of direction throws back to the band’s early days. Before it was an album, Bedrooms of the Nation was the group’s original name, back when they played louder, brasher punk.

The Stars are fascinated by the music of the fifties and sixties, particularly the gap between what the artists sang and how they lived their lives. Acts like The Beach Boys spun some wonderful harmonies, but their lives were anything but. “The parameters around pop music at that time were very limiting,” Rory says. “You couldn’t say what you actually felt or were experiencing if it didn’t conform to pretty traditional themes. So I was always curious: what would they write if they were actually free to write about what they wanted?”

Probably something a lot like a Shimmering Stars song. The sock hop influence shows up in the blended harmonies and bouncy melodies that appear in even the most shadowy tracks, a sort of through-line piercing the noise. Even when a song like Shadow Visions launches into a thunderous third act, it’s guided by a jaunty guitar line and a ghostly bah-bah-bah backup vocal. Much like the night sky, there are speckles of light among the dark (if you’ll forgive a guy a True Detective reference). Mixing pop techniques with experimental elements is nothing new, they say. They point out guys like Frank Black and Kurt Cobain who built experimental sounds around a core pop sensibility. “I think no matter how dark or noisy the music gets,” drummer Andrew Dergousoff says, “Rory’s got a secret, guilty pop affiliation.”

“You can indulge the fringe styles,” Rory adds, “but it’s got to have a melody.”

Lyrically, things are as dark as they were on Hearts, but the songs take an angle more philosophical than personal: “Things that expand beyond my own, sad-bastard experiences,” Rory says. The mood lightens as the album progresses, culminating in the cathartic closer I Found Love.

The addition of bassist Elisha Rembold allowed Brent Sasaki to switch to guitar (his playing style, according to his bandmates, “has been described as ‘nervous piano.’”) Not only did that free them to write chunkier songs, but markedly improved their live performances, too, the band agrees.

That’s something you can decide for yourself on August 2nd. Until then, you can hear a few tracks off Bedrooms of the Nation here.

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GOODS | Local Tribute To Paul McCartney’s “Ram” Goes Down At The Biltmore On July 7

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward Street in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The Biltmore Cabaret is located at 2755 Prince Edward St. in Vancouver, BC | 604.676.0541 | biltmorecabaret.com

The GOODS from The Biltmore Cabaret

Vancouver, BC | The Biltmore Cabaret presents RAM ON, a tribute to Paul McCartney’s “Ram” with Sprïng and members of Synthcake, plus special guests. Sprïng is a neo-psychedelic band based out of Vancouver. In March of 2014, they released their debut LP entitled Celebrations and are currently playing shows both locally and abroad in support of the release. On the July 7th – to celebrate Sprïng member Joseph Hirabayashi’s birthday – they will be paying tribute to former Beatle Sir Paul McCartney’s Ram, an eclectic, eccentric, and manically infused super Beatles record released in 1971 (a cult favourite among McCartney fans). Joining Sprïng will be Lana Pitre and Kristy-Lee Audette of Vancouver locals Synthcake. The band has dubbed the project “Sprïngcake” and is excited to be joined by Spencer Owen and Classic Rick. Learn more after the jump… Read more

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