GOODS | Chinatown’s “Mamie Taylor’s” To Launch Weekend Brunch Service April 26th

April 17, 2014 

Mamie Taylor's is a new restaurant and bar at 251 East Georgia Street in the heart of Chinatown | mamietaylors.ca

Mamie Taylor’s is a new restaurant and bar at 251 East Georgia Street in the heart of Chinatown | mamietaylors.ca

The GOODS from Mamie Taylor’s

Vancouver, BC | Since opening in August of 2013, Mamie Taylor’s has built its reputation on Chef Tobias Grignon’s contemporary comfort food and a thriving lounge and bar scene. It only follows, then, that Chinatown’s modern American restaurant offer a Southern-themed brunch, whether as an informal weekend stop-in or a much-needed and consoling pick-me-up for the day after the night before.

Served from 11am to 3pm on Saturdays and Sundays (beginning Saturday, April 26), brunch at Mamie Taylor’s will introduce Vancouver diners to unique regional specialities direct from the America’s southern states.

The Kentucky Hot Brown is inspired by its namesake, Louisville’s iconic Brown Hotel, where the hot sandwich of house-smoked confit turkey, tomato, crisp bacon and Mornay sauce has been welcoming weekend warriors since 1926. Egg and Grits, a staple south of the Mason-Dixon line, folds aged white cheddar into hominy grits. Topped with an egg and baked, it’s finished with tomatillo salsa verde, minced jalapenos, and scallions. Of course, no Southern-inspired menu would be complete without Chicken Fried Steak, served with charred green tomatoes and a drizzling of decadent white bacon gravy.

The new menu will also feature classic brunch fare, jazzed up in Mamie Taylor’s signature down-home style. The Biscuit Benny (choice of Smoked Pork Belly with Apple Chutney or vegetarian Poblano Chili and Goat Cheese) is stacked on a lighter-than-air biscuit, then smothered and covered with Hollandaise. Cobb Salad boasts fresh peaches and a house-made Avocado Ranch dressing. With an ironic nod to Americana, Freedom Toast substitutes French toast’s brioche for pan-seared buttermilk biscuit and is served with a seasonal fruit compote, clabbered buttermilk ricotta and a crumbling of candied pecans. Learn more after the jump… Read more

SEEN IN VANCOUVER #492 | Making Sense Of The Abandoned Alley Chairs Of East Van

April 17, 2014 

This gallery of Alley Chairs can be found in our new HOODS section. It was curated by Nicole Arnett, an invaluable friend to Scout. It documents (invents) the dramas that explain the abandoned alleyway chairs and sofas of East Van.

EVERYTHING SEEN IN VANCOUVER

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS | Yaletown’s Homer St. Cafe & Bar Now Hiring For The Kitchen

April 17, 2014 

The Homer St. Cafe & Bar is located at 898 Homer St. in Vancouver, BC | 604-428-4299 | www.homerstreetcafebar.com

The Homer St. Cafe & Bar is located at 898 Homer St. in Vancouver, BC | 604-428-4299 | homerstreetcafebar.com

The GOODS from Homer St. Cafe & Bar

Vancouver, BC | Homer St. Cafe and Bar is now recruiting for kitchen positions. We are looking for motivated candidates with a background in casual dining to join our award winning team. We are looking for team players who excel in fast-paced, high energy environments and are legally entitled to work in Canada. We value the interest of all applicants; however only those selected for an interview will be contacted. All interested candidates please forward your resumes to tret [at] homerstreetcafebar.com. Learn more about Homer St. Cafe after the jump… Read more

BREWER’S BLOG | On Two World Wars And Surviving Belgium’s Dark Age Of Light Beer

April 17, 2014 

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This is the seventh in a nine-part story chronicling Dageraad brewer Ben Coli’s exploration of two questions he had to answer before taking the gamble of his life in starting a brewery: What is Belgian beer and can it be brewed here?

by Ben Coli | In Belgium’s forested, hilly Ardennes region, there is a valley called Vallée des Fées (Valley of the Fairies) and at the bottom of that valley there is a tiny village called Achouffe. In this village there was once a cowshed, and in that cowshed a tiny brewery was born.

Brasserie d’Achouffe was started by Pierre Gobon and his brother-in-law Chris Bauweraerts in 1982, which was a dark time for Belgian brewing. With the number of excellent breweries thriving in Belgium today, it’s easy to forget that Belgium, like North America, went through an age of industrial lagers.

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Of the more than 3000 breweries that operated in Belgium in the early 1900s, only 750 survived both world wars. The wars were tough on Belgium’s small breweries: those that weren’t outright destroyed had their equipment requisitioned by the metal-hungry German army.

When the smoke cleared and reconstruction began, things got really tough for small Belgian brewers.

Light, pilsner-style beers came into style in a big way, and improvements in refrigeration and transportation made it easier for enormous industrial breweries to distribute nationally. All across Belgium, small breweries that had been making regional styles of beer for generations went bankrupt. By the end of the 1970s, seven breweries were responsible for 75% of the beer made in Belgium. More than half of the country’s beer was brewed by just two breweries: Artois and Jupiler.

Today we can only imagine how many amazing styles of beer were lost with the closing of so many small breweries. In fact, witbier, that classic style of Belgian wheat ale that is now the darling of British Columbia’s craft brewers, was actually extinct.

But in the midst of the carnage, Belgian brewing still had glimmers of hope. In 1966, brewer Pierre Celis resurrected witbier when he opened a brewery in the village of Hoegaarden. Then in the early 1980s a few upstart breweries began to emerge from the metaphorical rubble. Anyone who has witnessed the explosion of craft brewing in the US and Canada over the last 30 years will recognize the story of Belgium’s beer renaissance: a few dedicated homebrewers, bored of industrial lagers and nostalgic for what beer tasted like in the “good old days”, started tinkering in their kitchens. They got their hands on some old tanks from the dairy industry, cobbled together makeshift brewing equipment and started a revolution.

Among them were Achouffe’s Pierre and Chris. Brewing with a lauter tun crafted out of the drum of a washing machine, they began hand-filling and hand-corking repurposed champagne bottles and selling their brew to locals.

To compete with the flood of industrial lager washing over Belgium, Pierre and Chris would need an amazing yeast, one that could complement their blonde ale with a balance of subtly spicy phenols and juicy, fruity esters. Fortunately for them, when they went to one of the few remaining local small breweries with a bucket, they got a yeast capable of turning their hobby into an empire.

La Chouffe image with permission from La Chouffe | Map: Eli Horn | BREWER’S BLOG ARCHIVE

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P&I_00040728Ben Coli is owner and brewer of Dageraad Brewing, British Columbia’s first brewery specializing in Belgian-style ales. An award-winning home brewer, Ben formalized his brewing knowledge at the Pacific Institute of Culinary Arts and at Brewlab in the United Kingdom, earning a certificate from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling. Before his beer obsession took over, Ben was a writer of books, magazine articles and marketing content. He is currently writing a book titled “How to Love Beer.”

GOODS | Red Truck Wins Gold With Pale Ale At The 2014 “Fest Of Ale” In The Okanagan

April 17, 2014 

Red Truck Beer Co. is located at 1015 Marine Dr. in North Vancouver | 604-682-4733 | www.redtruckbeer.com

Red Truck Beer Co. is located at 1015 Marine Dr. in North Vancouver | 604-682-4733 | www.redtruckbeer.com

The GOODS from Red Truck Beer Company

Vancouver, BC | The 2014 “Fest Of Ale” event was held on April 4th and 5th at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre and had 35 brewers from BC and beyond. Each of the participating breweries put forward their best brews for judging. The awards were determined by industry experts Joe Wiebe, Craft Beer Revolution; Jim Martin, Metro Liquor; David Beardsell, brewery owner/consultant; Mike Garson, Mike’s Craft Beer; and Allan Moen, NorthWest Brewing News. The Judges awarded Best in Class for Pale Ale to Red Truck Ale made by Vancouver’s own Red Truck Beer Company. Take a look at the other award-winners after the jump… Read more

COOL THING WE WANT #429 | This Bird Flipbook Machine By Artist Juan Fontanive

April 17, 2014 

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(via) Beyond being transfixingly pretty, this machine flipbook by artist Juan Fontanive also makes a mesmerizing racket, of a sort similar to that of the old flip machines that would list arrival times at airports before life went digital. And if you dig butterflies more than hummingbirds, you’re in luck

EVERY COOL THING WE WANT

GOODS | “Much & Little” On Main Street Announces Expansion Into Space Next Door

April 16, 2014 

Much & Little is located at 2541 Main St. in Mount Pleasant | Vancouver, BC | 604-709-9034 | www.muchandlittle.com

Much & Little is located at 2541 Main St. in Mount Pleasant | Vancouver, BC | 604-709-9034 | muchandlittle.com

The GOODS from Much & Little

Vancouver, BC | After 2 1/2 years in business, Much&Little is proud to announce the recent expansion of their location at 2541 Main Street. An intimate shop specializing in timeless, hand-crafted goods and accessories, it is now double the size with half the space dedicated entirely to women’s clothing. Consistent with the store’s original concept to support independent businesses, clothing is also sourced from emerging or indie designers and is mostly North American-made. Many of the labels are not available anywhere else in the city such as art school-influenced Feral Childe, vintage-inspired Lauren Moffatt, and the minimal and edgy Black Crane.

The refurbished section of the shop takes over the former space of Whoa! Nellie Bikes. Although joined, the spaces have a distinct ambience. The original side focuses on home goods, accessories and gifts. The new side, with its cosy cabin feel, showcases clothing. Change rooms and store fixtures are made with reclaimed wood, while the floor and walls are adorned with vintage kilim rugs, most of which are for sale. Read more

DINER | New Location Of Meat & Bread To Open On Yates Street In Victoria This July

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by Andrew Morrison | Frankie Harrington, Cord Jarvie, and Joseph Sartor are opening a new location of Meat & Bread - their third – at 721 Yates Street in Victoria, BC’s old Churchill Building. That’s between Douglas and Blanshard, so right in the heart of the city. It’s a heritage space – a little bit bigger than Meat & Bread’s Gastown location – and they have Craig Stanghetta reprising his role as designer. I don’t expect they’ll veer too far from the original modern-meets-heritage aesthetic, and the menu will still be anchored by their famous porchetta sandwich and either a vegetarian or grilled cheese. We can also expect a location-specific signature sandwich, much like Gastown has its meatball and Coal Harbour has its corned beef. They’ve only just taken possession and hope to start construction in early May for a July opening. Need work? They’re setting up interviews for core staff as we speak. Email your resumes to info [at] meatandbread.ca.

ALL ANTICIPATED OPENINGS

GOODS | “Fort Berens Estate Winery” Welcomes South African Wine-Making Pair

April 15, 2014 

Fort Berens Estate Winery is located at 1881 Highway 99 North in Lillooet, BC | 250-256-7788 | fortberens.ca

Fort Berens Estate Winery is located at 1881 Highway 99 North in Lillooet, BC | 250-256-7788 | fortberens.ca

The GOODS from Fort Berens Winery

Lillooet, BC | The weather is heating up, the sun is shining and the season is off to a great start for Fort Berens Estate Winery in Lillooet. With some major milestones behind them, including the groundbreaking of their new winery in the fall and winning White Wine of the Year at Cornucopia in November, the team is bursting with excitement as spring blossoms. For Fort Berens, this spring brings new growth to their team, the blossoming of their winery construction project and a bountiful spring release of their favourite and new varietals.

Rolf de Bruin, founder and one of the owners of Fort Berens, announced, “We are absolutely delighted to welcome Megan de Villiers and Danny Hattingh to the Fort Berens team. Megan is our new Vineyard Manager and Danny is our new Winemaker. They are a couple in real life and also in the vineyard and cellar. They have worked together as a winery team for a number of years and join our team with experience from South Africa, the Southern Gulf Islands and the Okanagan. When Heleen and I met with Danny and Megan, we felt an immediate connection with them as we discovered that their journey was not unlike ours. We have all enjoyed many great adventures along the way. While our paths were different, those paths led all of us to Lillooet, and we are so pleased that Megan and Danny are joining us here.” Read more

DRINKER | On Crafting The Classic Los Angeles Spring Cocktail, The “Brown Derby”

April 15, 2014 

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by Shaun Layton | As the seasons change, so do our choice of cocktails. With Spring is upon us, our tastes go from dark, strong, and stirred cocktails to those that are bright, refreshing, and shaken. Enter the Brown Derby cocktail…

Hailing from Hollywood in its golden years, the Brown Derby is one of only a few memorable drinks to have graduated from Southern California. Though not widely known for having a craft cocktail scene, LA did indeed have one, and if you know where to go, it still has one (avoid the “gimme a Goose and Red Bull, chief!” places that are a dime a dozen and check out place like The Varnish, The Roger Room, and Seven Grand).

The Brown Derby cocktail was named after the the famous hat-shaped watering hole in Hollywood that was founded between-the-wars by Wilson Mizner. The funny thing is that it got its name at another joint – the competition, so to speak – another LA celeb hotspot called The Vendôme Club, where stars like Canadian-born Mary Pickford and partner Douglas Fairbanks were regulars (they both also have cocktails named after them, but that’ll be another article one day). Legend has it that one night, Herbert Somborn, an ex-husband of Gloria Swanson, remarked how one “could open a restaurant in an alley and call it anything. If the food and service were good, the patrons would just come flocking. It could be called something as ridiculous as the Brown Derby…”

The Savoy cocktail book has a cocktail called De Rigueur that predates the Brown Derby and has the same ingredients, so purists (and nerds) may call the latter a copy. But you know what? It’s got a great story, so I’m sticking with it. Learn how to make it after the jump… Read more

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS | Gastown’s PiDGiN Is On The Lookout For Front Of House Staff

April 15, 2014 

Pidgin is located at 350 Carrall Street in Vancouver’s Gastown | 604.620.9400 | www.PidginVancouver.com

Pidgin is located at 350 Carrall Street in Vancouver’s Gastown | 604.620.9400 | www.PidginVancouver.com

The GOODS from Pidgin

Vancouver, BC | Gastown’s Pidgin is currently seeking an enthusiastic part-time floor manager and server to join their team. Candidates must have experience working in a fast-paced restaurant setting and have a strong passion for hospitality, food and drink. Please submit your applications to resumes [at] pidginyvr.com. Learn more about the restaurant after the jump… Read more

GHOST HOODS | On The Rise And Tragic Fall Of ‘Nihonmachi’ On The Downtown Eastside

April 15, 2014 

The GHOST HOOD series dovetails with the new HOODS section of Scout

by Stevie Wilson | Railtown-Japantown is a compounded micro-hood that is part of DTES. Its boundaries are Main (some say Columbia) in the west to Heatley in the east and from the railway tracks (hence the name) south to Alexander Street. What was once a thriving industrial zone of warehouses and workshops has become something of a tech/design hub over the last decade. Railway St. itself is now a parade of local fashion houses (Aritzia has its head office here), design shops, tech start ups, interior stores, and even an urban winery. You’ll often find a food truck or three parked hereabouts, too, and a whole lot of Instagramming going down. What does the future hold for it? Either breweries and condos. Probably both.

Vancouver’s historic Japantown, however, is vastly different. Once home to generations of Japanese families and businesses, the area now features only a few remnants of the large community that once thrived there. The history of this cultural enclave is unique, and offers a startling look at the effects of racism, intolerance, and indifference in a city now celebrated for its multiculturalism.

Though the modern diaspora of Japanese-Canadians is now found throughout Vancouver, at one time this neighbourhood was the epicentre of local Japanese culture and business. The site spans from Cordova Street to Alexander Street, between Gore Avenue and Jackson Avenue, just north of Chinatown, with Powell Street as its (former) commercial center. It features several character buildings, primary historic sites, and a handful of municipally protected buildings, each indicative of the neighbourhood’s development – and its subsequent losses – experienced over the last century.

While Japanese (and Chinese) workers had been present in British Columbia as early as the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush in 1858, the first “official” Japanese immigrant to Canada arrived in 1877. Following this, an influx of Japanese immigrants came to Vancouver near the turn of the century to work in the booming fishing and forestry industries. While they were a welcomed labour force for local industries in the city, particularly the nearby Hastings Sawmill at the foot of Dunlevy, many white Vancouverites were wary of what they perceived as a failure of the Japanese to assimilate, observing that they had their own cultural and religious spaces, generally did not speak fluent English, and had a perceived (potentially dangerous) loyalty to Japan. Additionally, many non-Japanese fishermen were concerned about the growing majority of Japanese fishing licenses being granted, fearing that their jobs were at stake. The federal government aggressively limited Asian immigration and originally only men were allowed to enter the country, forcing them to leave their families behind.

While many white Vancouverites tolerated the Japanese community, prejudice found a strong foothold in the Asiatic Exclusion League, a racist organization with aims “to keep Oriental immigrants out of British Columbia.” Following the 1885 imposition of the Chinese Immigration Act, which placed a head tax on Chinese immigrants entering Canada, racism and racial segregation had been a common sight across the country and extended the growing Japanese communities. This tension culminated in Vancouver on September 7th when members of the Asiatic Exclusion League rioted in the streets of Chinatown after being roused by racist speeches at City Hall (then located near Main and Hasting).

They marched into Chinatown shouting racist slogans, smashing windows, and vandalizing buildings. By the time the rioters reached Japantown, members of the Japanese community were waiting with makeshift weapons and bottles, ready to defend their neighbourhood. In response to the growing anti-Asian sentiment in Canada, the Canadian Minister of Labour Rodolphe Lemieux and Japanese Foreign Minister Tadasu Hayashi declared what is known as the “Gentleman’s Agreement” in 1908, wherein the Japanese government voluntarily limited its approved number of immigrants to Canada each year.

As white settlers migrated out of the area and into newer, more affluent communities – particularly the West End – Japanese business, cultural centres, and mixed-use buildings developed in the Powell Street area. Shops along Powell began opening in 1890, but the retail industry of took shape later, during the commercial building boom from 1907-1912. Multiple residential buildings, often with street-level shops, became popular in later decades as the boarding room trend developed. These apartments typically housed seasonal workers; many now function as SROs.

Business development in Japantown – which locals called “Nihonmachi” (derived from the Japanese words for “Japan” and “Town”) – culminated in the 1920s and 30s, when local shops and restaurants flourished, and ties to nearby Chinatown also became strong. A shared sense of Asian identity – and likely a shared sense of the effects of racism – joined these communities. Fuji Chop Suey at 341 Powell, which offered Japanese-style Chinese food, is a unique example of the link between Asian cultures during this period, and is heralded as one of the important locales contributing to the area’s rich multiculturalism from 1931-1942. Japantown’s famous Asahi baseball team, established in 1914, won several championships and were a popular draw during the 1930s and early 1940s for the Japanese and non-Japanese communities in Vancouver. In 2003, the team was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.

Ultimately, Japantown and Vancouver’s Japanese population fell victim to the xenophobia brought forth by World War II. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour in 1941, a series of legislations were imposed on Japanese-Canadians under the guise of national security. In addition to curfews, interrogations, job loss and property confiscation, all persons of Japanese heritage were forcibly relocated to Internment Camps in remote areas of the province. Their property and belongings were sold, and all mainstream Japanese newspapers and publications were shut down. In 1944, Prime Minister Mackenzie King declared that all Japanese-Canadians were required to relocate to eastern Canada or face repatriation. By the end of the 1940s, however, many individuals had been granted re-entry to the west coast and, finally, the right to vote. The variety of Japanese shops, restaurants, and vibrant community culture in Japantown never fully recovered from these events, and until the resurgence of Japanese cuisine in the 1980s only two ethnic restaurants remained on Powell.

Today, Japantown still retains a few visible reminders of its past, but has yet to be designated as a Historic Site by the City of Vancouver. This means that many of its remaining historic buildings are at risk. In 2013, the 122 year-old Ming Sun building at 439 Powell was threatened when city officials deemed it structurally unsound. Without proper heritage designation, it was up to the local community to save the site and propose restoration, rather than demolition. As a reminder of the rich history of the area and the continued legacy of the Japanese community in Vancouver, the Powell Street Festival at Oppenheimer Park is the largest annual Japanese-Canadian festival in Canada, and the city’s longest-running community celebration since its inception in 1977.

MORE VANCOUVER HISTORY

GOODS | New Cocktails And Spring Dinner Menu At The Bottleneck On Granville Street

April 15, 2014 

Bottleneck Spring Menu

The Bottleneck is located at 870 Granville Street in Vancouver, BC | 604-739-4540 | www.thebottleneck.ca

The GOODS from The Bottleneck

Vancouver, BC | The Bottleneck is excited to announce the official launch of its new Spring Dinner. The new menu will include two fresh signature cocktails, the return of the Albacore Tuna Salad, a new “perfectly portioned” macrobiotic bowl that changes weekly and is available daily for lunch (all lunch menu dishes $10 or less, eat in or grab and go). Having successfully established itself as an innovative leader in the local dining scene, The Bottleneck’s Spring Dinner Menu continues to deliver unique and satisfying options for their hungry visitors. Details after the jump… Read more

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