When Development Interferes With an Artist’s Daily Inspiration

A still image taken from “The Monolith”

(via) Vancouver is no stranger to the displacement of artists by development, but what happens when development directly interferes with an artist’s inspiration? In New York City, artist Gwyneth Leech was faced with such a dreary prospect as her therapeutic studio with a view was interrupted by the arrival of a new hotel high-rise that would ultimately block the vista she had relied upon for so long for inspiration. In the short film, The Monolith, we are taken on an emotional ride from grim grief to surprising acceptance.

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  1. I’d like to think there is a parallel with Vancouver. I can see why scout would post this. The resilience is inspiring, but I’m not sure I can have it for Vancouver despite the inspiring people living here. I’m surprised the exodus of people and families isn’t more pronounced. Who are we doing this for? Why are we accepting this? Cause we are accepting this fate. Gregor Robertson”s recent article proves that as people we have failed ourselves. Nothing has changed except the city view. I voted for him. what a disappointment. We vote for people, for change, but the machine is still the same. The middle class isn’t what you think it is anymore. We are at the upper crust of the middle class. Everybody below that is struggling. Stop pretending.

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