We Want This Swedish Mountainside ‘Lofthuset’ to Overlook all of Squamish

With our city now so laughably unaffordable, thousands of Vancouverites are stuck imagining wonderful homes instead of living in them. “Spaced” is a record of our minds wandering the world of architecture and design, up and away from the unrewarding realities of shoebox condos, dark basement suites, and sweet fuck all on Craigslist.

(via) In the north of Sweden on the side of Asberget mountain, local architect Hanna Michelson of Stockholm firm Tham & Videgård recently built this 33 ft. tall, two storey “Lofthuset”. It is lifted up  by a spruce and heart pine framework that continues up all the way to the top of the structure. The gangplank-accessed lower floor acts as a minimally (but beautifully) appointed shelter and living space with ash and birch carpentry, while the ladder-accessed upper floor is exposed to the elements (albeit with a roof), offering breathtaking views. Keeping with the traditions of the area, what walls there are are insulated with flax fibres.

It is actually the first of four identical getaway buildings planned for the slopes of Asberget, so it got us thinking: why not make a fifth for us? Since this is all about fantasy, we’d gladly take ours on a mountainside overlooking Squamish, thank you very much.

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