‘New Yorker’ Split Screen Glimpses NYC Continuity

(via) With Side By Side, The New Yorker magazine has put together footage of several New York City street scenes from the 1930s and then split-screened it in sequence with film taken from the same streets today. What’s remarkable about it is how so much and yet so little has changed. I mean, just look at the traffic and those no look lane changes! Scout did a tour of Fred Herzog’s iconic Vancouver photo locations a couple of years ago; it would be interesting to see something similar done with old film footage. Seeing a moving measure of our own continuity would be pretty cool. (To the creative locals who take it upon themselves to try, let us know when you’re done!)

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  1. Nice. Who knew that more people ride bicycles in 201X than did in 193X? That marked crosswalks or ped crossing signals didn’t exist? Not me.

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