Rediscovering A Lost Typeface And Adapting It For 21st Century Use

(via) There’s a different origins story for each and every typeface. We know, for example, that Swiss designers Max Miedinger and Eduard Hoffmann invented Helvetica in 1957, and that Comic Sans was the spawn of faceless, fornicating demons bent on melting the eyes of all who dared read it. This short video looks back over a century into the birth of stately ‘Sherman’, a font designed in 1910 by legendary type designer and artist Frederic Goudy for Syracuse University’s School of Journalism (see also Powell, Goudy, Copperplate Gothic, Garamond, Camelot, et cetera — the guy was nothing if not prolific). Exploring this connection led to some cool discoveries that allowed the University – and Brooklyn type designer Chester Jenkins – to ‘revive’ and digitize Sherman for 21st century use.

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